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Vod & Directv

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by davidord, Aug 3, 2007.

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  1. Aug 8, 2007 #101 of 128
    texasmoose

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    VOD blows, just get a dang HR20/21 and you're all set. This feature on TWC/Comcrap/Adelphia was a frickin' joke. All you peeps with no DVR need to pony up & quit whining to D* about VOD. It's such a waste of time, un-frickin-reality!
     
  2. Aug 8, 2007 #102 of 128
    Earl Bonovich

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    Ummm... VOD is going to require the HR20 (at least in it's initial phase).

    And just because a Cable-Co's version was a joke, doesn't mean the service on another provider will be...
     
  3. Aug 8, 2007 #103 of 128
    JFHughes08088

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    Downloading HD content over wireless B or G will take time. The USB wireless adapter is an option (maybe) as they have become quite common in networks. I still wired my HR20 via ethernet for speed reasons.
     
  4. Aug 8, 2007 #104 of 128
    RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    Probably, for most folks, their intenet connection will be the bottle neck. 802.11G should handle it with no problem and if they have the 'standard' DSL connection (3Mpbs or less) 802.11B would probably also not be the problem.
     
  5. Aug 8, 2007 #105 of 128
    JFHughes08088

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    True, most wireless set-ups are capable of data transfer much faster than the download speed.
     
  6. Aug 8, 2007 #106 of 128
    bto4wd

    bto4wd Duplicate User (Account Closed)

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    That's very true. Most home wireless networks still handle data faster than the home's broadband connection.

    Now another side could be if the HR20's guts can handle the data. My DTivos with Networking and MRV enabled only run about 200K. Barely enough to keep up with an SD program. Limits of the software and hardware. If one's HR20 is recording a couple of programs, playing live TV and pulling down VOD the REAL bottleneck may be the HR20 itself.
     
  7. Aug 8, 2007 #107 of 128
    MikeR

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    I check out the Comcrapstic forum occasionally, a significant number indicate VOD is one of reasons they don't switch to DBS. The others being LOS, triple play/single bill, DLB, and lease program (which may indicate that price is their single motivator to change providers).

    Reading some of those threads makes the HR20/MPEG4/VOD/MRV implementation seem painless.

    http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/road-to-...rogramming-until-cablecard-is-easy-271310.php
     
  8. Aug 9, 2007 #108 of 128
    jes

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    Figure ~ 50% overhead for wireless... unless you're lucky enough to have FIOS, 802.11B should hold it's own to ~5M. Ethernet over power or what ever it's called is the worst idea on the planet. It basically adds digital noise to your A/C line. (how many of you have shielded A/C lines?) If you are using X10 or similar power line automation control, you are already using momentary "noise" to control your lights. I'm guessing if you or your close neighbors add Ethernet over power, you can kiss off the reliability of your power line home automation devices... :(

    As far as the whole VOD thing, I'm with those against it, in favor of using a DVR. Unless we get to the technological point (next generation) of the majority having the choice of reasonably priced high speed internet (~100M) to their homes, all this VOD, streaming video, live gaming, VoIP, etc. is just adding to the extreme congestion of the exisiting infrastructure...
     
  9. mtnagel

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    Party pooper :D
     
  10. JFHughes08088

    JFHughes08088 Godfather

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    Instead of calling it "Video On Demand", it seems to be more like "Download On Demand". This doesn't bother me since the device can download the beginning of a show and begin play while it downloads the rest.
     
  11. Thaedron

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    Yep, anything inside your home (unless you have a very poor WiFi signal) is going to beat the snot off of your WAN connection. I have a Gigabit switch in my basement though the only devices that are >100Mbit speed are my computer and 500MB SAN device. I was fortunate enough to be able to do all of the wiring in our home during the construction process so I've got ehternet drops to both my HR20 and Denon4306, both of which are 100Mbit only.

    Even if I had to resort to wireless, 802.11g will go to 54Mbit and 802.11b to 11Mbit. All of the above are > my 5 Mbit DSL connection.
     
  12. Thaedron

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    I concur, though we both sound like realists, not necessarily marketing types. :lol:
     
  13. JFHughes08088

    JFHughes08088 Godfather

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    Frankly, between DVR and VOD (assuming what I want is available via VOD) I might never leave the couch. Oh yeah, except for that work thing.
     
  14. davidord

    davidord Godfather

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    Then it would be "DOD," and that one is taken by the "Department of Defense."

    Maybe it should be: "WPVODBYWSIUCES2008." "We Promised VOD But You Won't See It Until CES 2008."
     
  15. JFHughes08088

    JFHughes08088 Godfather

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    It's all a matter of bandwidth, transmit capabilities, etc. Me, I'm pushing bandwidth pretty hard with 5 computers surfing, all connected via wireless B or G, plus VoIP.

    VoIP can fall victim to issues while being on a call AND doing a large upload (as in large attachment to an email). Download hasn't been an issue since I purchase faster speed. We will see.................
     
  16. BubbaDude

    BubbaDude AllStar

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    It's ironic that VOD is coming back to the DVR, as the first DVR companies were started by people who had got their feet wet in digitial TV by building video servers for VOD trials. The early VOD systems were too expensive because they required the vendor to build a complete high-speed ATM network, and the limited demand for VOD over rental stores didn't justify it financially. That was mid-90s, before broadband Internet caught on. So now we're full circle and we have good enough gear in the home to mask the inconsistency of the access network.

    Early on some people were complaining about how hard it is to setup a WiFi network. The vendors are aware of this and have developed a one-button easy setup scheme (under the sponsorship of the WiFi Alliance) to solve this problem in a standard, multi-vendor way. Networks that use WiFi easy setup will be secure and any granny can use them.

    Regarding HomePlug (powerline networking), I used to work with the guys who invented HomePlug 2.0, and from everything they've told me it's a completely practical system for video streaming. That was actually their model application that the whole system was built around, so don't dismiss it.

    HD video streaming over the Internet is a practical reality today, it simply requires the right kind of compression and a bit more patience than SD streaming. You can use BitTorrent or Netflix to get video-on-demand today, with varying degrees of delay before your show starts up; for Netflix it's almost instant.

    VOD is a problem for satellite TV companies as their product has to compete with a variety of Internet-based services that don't have to pay for the kind of infrastructure the DBS companies own. With a couple of tweaks, the Internet can do everything that DBS does today, and for a fraction of the incremental cost of a standard Internet connection. That's probably why Murdoch sold his interest in DTV, the handwriting on the wall says DTV's business model is doomed.
     
  17. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    What couple of tweaks? Would fix some of the limitation that IPTV, such as AT&T's U-Verse product.... to allow it to do DIFFERENT HDTV program on ever TV...

    Best I can tell from the net resources, you can only do 1 HDTV program, and 4 SD's at once... after that... you have issues.

    DTV (SAT based) has a LONG time till it is "doomed", you need some MASSIVE upgrades to broadband infrastruture... as others have already wanted to point out... these pipes that COMCAST have laid down, are going to start to "hurt" if people start to download more.... what is going to happen, when all entertainment is via IP based transmissions.

    The FIBER to the door, is a LONG LONG way off... and who is to say, that DirecTV couldn't have a component that ran off that, like IPTV offerings.. instead of using SAT transmissions..

    Then not even the markets that don't even have CABLE yet, let alone BROADBAND....

    As with any company, as technology changes... they need to change with it... So the model "today" may not work for the next 10-15 years... but doesn't mean they can't adapt.
     
  18. JFHughes08088

    JFHughes08088 Godfather

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    16 Million customers and growing doesn’t sound like a doomed business model to me. Also, as long as cable continues to piss off its customers, the consumer will always search for an alternative. It's one of the big reasons VoIP took hold. If the telco's were looking out for their customers, loyalty would make it tougher for new entrants into the market.

    D* needs to continue to differentiate itself from the likes of other satellite players, cable, etc. For now, that differentiation is it's ability to deliver more HD (when it comes available), Sunday Ticket, etc. So far, D* seems to be investing more $ than others to deliver content, and deliver it in HD. Are they the best? Of course not. As a public, for profit company, they will have to balance the wants of the customers with the needs of the stock holders.
     
  19. BubbaDude

    BubbaDude AllStar

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    It's not appropriate for this list to get into all the details, just suffice it to say that the way the Internet and the cable TV access network operate today is less than ideal for video. Cable wastes a lot of bandwidth streaming each channel to each viewer whether he wants it or not (at any given time), so a switched architecture would be much more efficient. When all programming is digital, there's no reason not to switch and essentially deliver all programming "on demand."

    If the cable access network is converted, which doesn't require new cable, then the bandwidth available for the standard Internet connection is much greater and the limitations on IPTV less severe.

    Rumor has it that Dish and DirecTV are bidding on the 700 MHz spectrum the FCC is auctioning, because they realize the fact that they can't offer (serious) Internet access is a real problem.

    My assessment of the DBS business model is that it starts to collapse in a serious way about 5 years from now, but it could take a little longer. And certainly, there will always be niche markets in this country and in less-developed ones where it will continue to be attractive for much longer, so you don't need to sell your DirecTV stock just yet.

    Nothing lasts forever, especially technology.
     
  20. Jeremy W

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    You say that right after mentioning the fact that DirecTV and Dish are bidding on terrestrial wireless spectrum. They are obviously preparing to adapt to future changes in the marketplace. It's not like they're just sitting around with their head in the sand, thinking that everything is going to stay the same forever.
     
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