Were you bored when you left the service?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Apr 27, 2015.

  1. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I received some answers to this question in another thread. Ended up nearly hijacking the thread. So, I'll ask it here: Were you bored when you left the service? Also are there any terms that people who were never in the service might be interested in, such as stairs being called ladders in the Navy? I did see a term in the other thread that I didn't understand but didn't want to get into an argument over it. What does "slap and tickle" mean? I gather from the context of the post it's something derogatory, but I'm not sure.

    In that other thread MysteryMan replied that he found civilian life chaotic at first and I have to agree with that. After reading his post, I began to remember the problems I had. The Navy was so easy, just follow orders, get three hots and a cot, wonderful medical/dentistry care, always busy or out on liberty. And the camaraderie, as he also mentioned. All those good things gone. Had a terrible time the first few months.

    Rich
     
  2. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    I felt FREE again to go and do anything, anywhere, any time I wanted. I could not wait to get out.
     
  3. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I was bored before I left and couldn't wait to leave. My time was served in the Air Guard though which many people think doesn't count.

    Re-upped once after my first 6 -- big mistake.

    One morning on the way to the base (20 miles or so from home), some idiot pulled out in front of me. I missed her but hit a pole totaling the car. It was still driveable, so I limped it home. Got my other car and headed back to base. Section Chief had the nerve to give me crap for being late even after I explained why. Somewhat shocked and more than a bit annoyed, I basically told him to Eff Off. As soon as I was eligible (within a few days of that if I recall right), I was in Personnel signing the discharge papers.

    Probably good timing overall since the next Doink who mouthed off to me about saluting or not saluting somebody or something quick enough very well might have got his clock cleaned on the spot.
     
  4. Reaper

    Reaper Godfather

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    For many, retirement = boredom. I think it depends on the individual. I live a pretty quiet life and don't think I'll be bored when I retire.

    I served in the Marine Corps for 6 years (1984-1990). I immediately missed the camraderie, and still do.

    I had a good tour, and sometimes wonder what might have been had I stayed. But I agree with jimmie57, some of the personal liberties where pretty hard to live without.

    Now I work for the US Army Corps of Engineers as a civilian employee. My supervisor, also a civilian, thinks he's psuedo military. Ha! He has no idea...
     
  5. grover517

    grover517 AllStar

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    Although my time in the AF was rewarding, it really was more of just a job for me than a "life". That might have been due to the reason that once I finished basic and tech training, my life pretty much became what it was. I was stationed fairly close to home (7 hour "commute"), and my military work schedule (4 on, 3 off) meant that I could return home almost every single weekend for 3 days out of 7. So never had to rely on others I served with as my main source of entertainment or camaraderie. In short, the military was really nothing more than a really structured military existence during the week, where I lived the "military life" for 4 days and then returned home for 3.

    Additionally, I set it up so that upon discharge, I entered college and started working 2 different part time jobs within 2 weeks, so having one "structured" schedule ready to replace another also helped. It was only after I graduated college that I felt the "chaos" of real life. But again, with having that consistent and regular tie to my life before the military during that entire time, made the transition MUCH easier. I basically used the "structure" I learned in the military to help setup my life afterwards.

    So the only advise I can really offer here is to maybe look into "serving" in a different capacity such as volunteer work of some kind, college (if you haven't already), or maybe just looking for other military based groups in your area such as a VFW or veteran organizations where you can re-attain some of that camaraderie with other service members and possibly obtain other ideas on how to make the transition back to civilian life more fulfilling.
     
  6. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    We used a lot of terms during my three combat tours in Nam. Here are some of the more colorful ones......A Laugh a Minute: Going up river......Ash n Trash: Non-combative helicopter mission......Boom Boom: Short time with a prostitute......Bookoo: Many......Choke: Peanut Butter......Charlie Foxtrot: Cluster F***......Comic Books: Military Maps......Dinky Dau: Crazy......Gomers: North Vietnamese......FNG: F***ing New Guy......Grunt: Infantry......Freedom Bird: Any plane that took you back to the world (USA)......Leg Unit: Infantry......Mike: Minute......LRRP: Long Range Recon Patrol......Puff: AC-47 Gunship......Shadow: C-119 Gunship......Shake n Bake: Officer fresh out of OCS......Short Timer: Individual with little time left in country......Slick: Helicopter......Sneaky Petes: Special Forces or Rangers......Thunder Road: Highway 13 from Saigon to Loc Ninh known for mines and ambushes......Terms we used in Desert Storm......Ali Baba: Enemy Forces......Blue Canoe: Portable Toilet......Bohica: Bend over, Here it comes again......Christians In Action: Central Intelligence Agency......Lifer Juice: Coffee......Speed Bumps: Slang used by Tankers for Infantry Soldiers.
     
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  7. glrush

    glrush Cool Member/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I made 8 patrols on the USS Daniel Webster (SSBN-626 Gold Crew) from 1978-1982. I was a nuke and when I got out I felt like there is nothing I hadn't done or seen on that boat. Boomers just go into the ocean and hide; much less exciting than the fast attack world.

    One of the main reasons I got out was that I was bored of what I did.

    Glenn
     
  8. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Yes
    Being a cold war warrior had me out at the pointy end of the stick most of the time.
    Out there.... what you did and how well & quick you did it counted.
    There really isn't a place like that in the civilian world.
    Maybe working in an emergency room.
    The closest I got was being part of a pit crew during a race.
     
  9. iceturkee

    iceturkee DINFOS Trained Killer

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    i wasn't bored either time. but four months after i was discharged from the army in '77, i enlisted in the reserve. did that for over 3 years (army and navy) then decided to go back on active duty. my second discharge was medical so i was happy to be out.

    as for terms, not military but still interesting, water closet or double null (zero). learned about those quickly taking train from frankfurt, germany to augsburg where i was stationed for 21/2 years.
     
  10. lparsons21

    lparsons21 Hall Of Fame

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    I wasn't bored after leaving the Navy. I was in for around 22 years and enjoyed the career.

    I think what helped in the transition was that my last 5 years was as a recruiter. 3 years in West Plains, MO, 1 year in Cape Girardeau and 1 year in Marion, IL. Stayed in southern Illinois 'cause my wife had massive strokes and was vegetative in a nursing home for over 12 years. But the recruiting in rural areas meant I wasn't around many military folks at all and was interfacing on a daily basis with civilians.
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Were you shore based during your time in? I had that same feeling for a brief time, then reality hit. No more poker games, no more slush fund, no easy money (that sounds kinda callous to me, but it's the truth), no more adventure, just a boring job and a family to support. Wasn't what I thought it would be and it was chaotic getting used to it.

    Rich
     
  12. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I've always wondered what the AF would be like. For some reason, I've never known anyone who was in the AF. Yeah, what you had was more like a job than what I went thru. I don't think I could have taken shore duty as well as being in the fleet. That was interesting and beautiful and kinda scary if you sat down and really thought about what you were doing out there in a totally hostile environment. But the food on the shore bases...wow! And the odds on being based near home were pretty poor. Another thing I missed were the women.

    Rich
     
  13. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Those were six month patrols? I knew a lot of guys in the sub fleet. We were home based in Norfolk at the D&S piers and played a lot of softball against sub crews. And did a lot of drinking after the games and just sat around and talked about the differences in what we did. I don't think a sub and I would have been a good fit.

    Rich
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    People don't realize the danger we were all in during that period. Or how many times we were on the brink of war.

    Rich
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Spend much time at sea?

    Rich
     
  16. glrush

    glrush Cool Member/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Boomers have 2 crews, a Blue crew and a Gold crew (Naval Academy colors). The boat was actually in Holy Loch, Scotland. You would do a 30 day refit in Holy Loch then about 70-75 days underway, most of it underwater. Then, you would bring the boat back in, turn over to the other crew and fly back to the states to get some leave and do training. The time underway was pretty boring; you were locked in a 425 foot sewer pipe with 120 other guys. Spent a lot of time playing cards and watching some really bad movies.

    One of my most vivid memories was in Norfolk in the crews lounge watching the Bucky Dent game in '78. I am a big Sox fan and I had to eat that for 78 days underway from the Yankee fans. And there were ALOT of them !
     
  17. billsharpe

    billsharpe Hall Of Fame

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    Not bored my three years in the Army, especially the year spent in Germany.

    Not bored after I got out either. Got a job right away, got married within four months, moved from Philly to Connecticut within a year, had a son there, moved to California temporarily for a year when he was 1 1/2 years old, came back to Connecticut for a year, moved to a new job in California for eight years, changed jobs and returned to Pennsylvania for two years, then moved permanently to California. We had three more kids along the way.

    Retired from full time engineering job in 1989, retired from part-time teaching job in 2003, and still keep pretty busy with church and hobbies.
     
  18. 1953

    1953 Icon

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    My 20 years worth of military career fields were a perfect match for the civilian world so I went straight to a good job. After hard work and great college degree I achieved more than I ever thought possible. Unfortunately, my 13 year civilian career was cut short due to permanent health issues. The two things that both helped and hurt me was my dedication to get the job done and desipline. Dedication to work, employers loved while co-workers sometimes felt threatened. Seemed like I was the odd duck. Discipline from me was many times not a great fit with civilians. Even at its best, my expectations for those in my charge was mistaken as dictatorial. Regardless, I climbed the ladder to success. Entered the military in 1972 and retired in 1993. Had all the usual issues using military slang that no one other than another vet or my wife and kids understood. Still a die hard patriot and proud American.
     
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  19. lparsons21

    lparsons21 Hall Of Fame

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    Not as much as you might think! I was an Aviation Electronics tech and expected to be in a squadron or on a carrier for at least 1/2 the time. But after my 'A' school, I was the only one that put down 'any ship any squadron either coast' on my dream sheet, and got stationed in China Lake, CA in an experimental squadron for a couple years, then to 'B' school.

    Coming out of there I was assigned a west coast fighter squadron which was at sea on the Oriskany. Flew over to catch them, but that was the year they had the big fire. Got picked up on the way back. 2nd cruise, I had made E6 and we were over for E6 AT's so I got put on the beach crew in Cubi Point (Subic Bay Phillipines). So basically just a ride over to the PI and back again.

    Last sea duty was in a heavy photo outfit flying RA-5Cs. Made a Westpac but I again got put on the beach crew as crew chief. Then the only full cruise I made was to the Med on the Nimitz. About 11 months of a "6 month" cruise.

    Total actual on the ship time probably no more than 18 months I suspect.
     
  20. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I knew they have two crews. I thought they each spent six months at sea, but I guess that wouldn't work well. My destroyer was only about 350 feet long. I went aboard a couple of big subs in Norfolk, seemed pretty roomy compared to a destroyer and man, are those suckers big!

    Rich
     

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