When AT&T shuts down sat TV, what will become of the DBS allocated spectrum?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by tkrandall, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. Apr 30, 2019 #41 of 107
    tkrandall

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    No attempt to bring up FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt?) by my original post. I was simply reading AT&T recent (last 6 months) execs comment at face value, and contemporary takes on those comments in the media/industry journals. With those comments AT&T has painted a picture of their future predicated on OTT being the basis of their "TV" offering.
     
  2. Apr 30, 2019 #42 of 107
    Soccernut

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  3. Apr 30, 2019 #43 of 107
    inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Uh huh, sure...

    Satellite isn't going anywhere soon. It still amazes me people look at satellite as if it isn't a massive amount of bandwidth that att can utilize...

    And that guy won't even be CEO by the time Directv needs to worry about replacing any of their satellites, and he was wrong anyway if you take it as being all encompassing, since they have another sat going yup this year. UI have always felt he was talking about adding more freq ranges for satellites to be honest and trying to expand their bandwidth.
     
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  4. May 1, 2019 #44 of 107
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I agree.
     
  5. May 1, 2019 #45 of 107
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    most of posts here stated that wisdom :D
     
  6. May 1, 2019 #46 of 107
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    While that is true there are palm readers and sooth sayers posting gloom and doom for satellite TV service. They couldn't be further from the truth.
     
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  7. May 1, 2019 #47 of 107
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    that's last year [after OTT bum] trend ...

    we will see such posts again and again … NG will not give up that easy ;)
     
  8. May 1, 2019 #48 of 107
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I have been reading about the death of satellite on this website since I joined in 2003. To paraphrase Monty Python, it is not dead yet. Come back in another 15+ years. :)
     
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  9. May 20, 2019 #49 of 107
    dreadlk

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    If we look at what happened to C-Band we can make some educated guesses as to the fate of satellite TV.

    It’s not going to die anytime soon. Maybe in 20 years time. Because the rural population will need it for at least that length of time.

    When it does die it won’t matter to most of us because 95% of us would have already moved on to something much better.

    The only major variable is will TV in general be in the same kind of demand later down the road.
    Millennials have already shown a trend of not being as enthusiastic about watching TV as the older generations.

    Just my thoughts on the matter.
     
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  10. May 20, 2019 #50 of 107
    NashGuy

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    Yes, it's going to be a long decline for DBS TV but 20 years? I doubt there will be any DBS satellites operational come 2039, probably not even the final one that's going up this year.

    Meanwhile, the rural population will have other ways to access video entertainment well before 2039:
    Elon Musk has a 2027 deadline to surround Earth with high-speed Starlink internet satellites — but the service would work far sooner than that

    I imagine a young child in 2039 will look at the typical cable/satellite box of today much the way today's youngsters look at a rotary dial landline phone.
     
  11. May 20, 2019 #51 of 107
    SamC

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    So you are placing "will have" faith in ELON MUSK?


    LOL
     
  12. May 20, 2019 #52 of 107
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Starlink has a better chance of happening than hyperloop. But the math for the number of needed satellite launches (including replacements as they are shorter life) is not an easy goal to reach nor maintain. And that is before one considers the actual technology on the satellites and ground stations.
     
  13. May 20, 2019 #53 of 107
    NashGuy

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    Well, I dunno if Musk will make it happen. But between his Starlink, plus OneWeb, plus a little fly-by-night company called Amazon, I figure at least one of them will make widespread LEO satellite broadband access a reality in the 2020s.

    We'll see. I certainly hope so for two reasons: to help close the "digital divide" between urban and rural areas and to provide competition which should keep prices and data caps in check. Will at least be interesting to see how the race plays out and, if nothing else, we'll have a whole lot of rocket launches to watch live on YouTube in the coming years...
     
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  14. May 20, 2019 #54 of 107
    Soccernut

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    I don't care how I get my fix in the future, as long as it's affordable, it's high quality so I can watch on wall size screen (4k - 8k) and on demand so I can see what I want when I want where I want.
    Yes I know that's pie in the "sky" no pun intended :D
     
  15. May 20, 2019 #55 of 107
    JoeTheDragon

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    and does any steaming service have any planes to get into the Commercial market?
     
  16. May 21, 2019 #56 of 107
    inkahauts

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    I’ve yet to see anyone ever explain to me how streaming or cable are better delivery methods for tv for the majority of people than DBS satellite. They all have their pluses and minuses but I’ve yet to see anything that shows me satelite is inferior to any others in a substantive way.

    Particular services and based on content sure but not the technology, so I’ll believe sat will go away in 20 years when I see it. I believe satelites offerings will be valuable to enough people to continue indefinitely. Just as AM radio is still relevant today.
     
  17. May 21, 2019 #57 of 107
    dreadlk

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    Starlink is almost certain to happen. He just launched 60 of them so in 7 more flights he could have enough to start. Remember these are cookie cutter Sats, nothing elaborate and easy to mass produce.

    The problem is that I have heard no mention of it being used for video purposes. My feeling is that bandwidth restrictions will make that one pretty difficult to implement.
     
  18. May 21, 2019 #58 of 107
    NashGuy

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    DBS is a fine technology for broadcasting, i.e. putting out a fixed number of live video streams for everyone to watch at the same time. Where it falls short versus internet-based distribution systems is that DBS doesn't allow for on-demand video streams where an individual chooses exactly what he/she wants to watch right at that given moment. And more and more of our viewing time is shifting to on-demand. Meanwhile, internet-based distribution systems (e.g. IPTV) can also also handle one-to-many broadcasting of live video channels too via multicast. Internet-based systems also offer the possibility of viewer interactivity (which hasn't been huge so far, but might grow) as well as more lucrative targeted advertising. (Yes, I know DTV satellite has a clever system in place to do a bit of that already but I don't think it's in the same class of operations as internet-based targeted advertising, like what Google and Facebook do.)

    As we progress through the 2020s, we'll increasingly see cable TV operators migrate from traditional QAM to internet-based (IPTV and/or OTT) distribution. And we'll see OTA broadcasters embrace the internet protocol-based ATSC 3.0 distribution system. DBS will increasingly be alone as a non-internet-based form of video distribution. It'll still be able to do exactly what it does now -- broadcast a bunch of live video channels -- but that's all it will ever do.

    As for AM radio, it does still exist but I'm not sure I'd call it relevant. And if listeners had to pay a subscription fee to access AM radio, it definitely wouldn't even exist. I honestly can't recall the last time I heard AM radio. I'm not even sure if my car can tune it in.

    Well, I think something like 70% of all internet traffic right now IS video, so if Starlink is offering broadband service, it will be distributing video. As for whether or not Starlink might offer their own IPTV service (i.e. "Starlink TV") with a bundle of cable channels, cloud DVR, etc. over their own network, I have no idea. I've not read any rumors to suggest that they will. The increasing trend, it seems, is for new network operators to just tell customers that they can pick from any of the OTT services out there, or perhaps to partner with one of them (the way that Verizon 5G Home partners with YouTube TV) for marketing and combined billing purposes.
     
  19. May 21, 2019 #59 of 107
    NashGuy

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    You raise a good point. I can imagine DirecTV, being the leader in providing live sports TV to commercial establishments like restaurants and bars, continuing to have an important role in that market for some time after they fade in the residential market.

    That said, Comcast is now beginning to push into the commercial market, trying to get bars, etc. to adopt their X1 TV platform. X1 is currently a hybrid QAM + IPTV system. But there are signs that they are gradually shifting the X1 platform toward an all-IPTV future. For instance, just in the past couple months, the default option for new Comcast TV subscribers who sign up online or in store appears to be equipment that is all-IPTV: no internal hard drive for DVR, no QAM tuners. Everything -- linear channels, VOD, cloud DVR -- streams to the box via Comcast's managed IPTV system from their centralized servers in Colorado.
     
  20. May 21, 2019 #60 of 107
    Soccernut

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    And right now it's the only profitable service out there, all the rest are theories of what the future might be like.
    I wonder what the original owners of DirecTV strategy would be if they still had it?
     

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