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Which hdmi ultra 4k cable?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by FLASAT007, Dec 6, 2017 at 10:41 AM.

  1. FLASAT007

    FLASAT007 New Member

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    I’m setting up a 65” Samsung and the run is about 75 feet that I need for hdmi. I’ve been on amazon and see many options. Can anyone suggest which to go with? It gets hard as someone leaves a review “doesn’t support true 4k” etc... it’s also going to my AVR that I just got.

    Thanks
     
  2. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    This is a good place to compare the different cables available for your length requirement. Usually have good prices also.
    How to Choose the Right HDMI Cable
     
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  3. wilbur_the_goose

    wilbur_the_goose Hall Of Fame

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    They've started to introduce Fiber Optic HDMI cables for long runs.
     
  4. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    From what I have been reading here in the last few minutes I like this one. It supports HDR.
    SlimRun AV HDR Cable for HDMI Enabled Devices, 4K@60Hz, YUV4:4:4, 75ft - Monoprice.com
     
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  5. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Got a link to that?

    Rich
     
  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    See the specs on these cables and find cables long enough for your run with the same specs: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SI1J98W/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Rich
     
  7. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    I would never trust a passive cable for such a long run. I've had a few longer HDMI cables over the years and they always fail after a couple years. Solder joints going bad or whatever - there's no way to fix them so you're left having to replace them.

    Either get an active cable like Redmere, or better yet IMHO run cat6a and get a pair of the cat6a to HDMI converters. I prefer the latter as it would be a lot easier to pull a new twisted pair cable through a wall - even with conduit since the HDMI cable has a connector on the end it is far more likely to get wedged somewhere along the way. The twisted pair cable is also more flexible, if someday you don't need that long HDMI run anymore you can use it for something else.

    Monoprice Blackbird 4K Pro HDBaseT Extender Kit, IR, 70m with PoC, RS232, HDCP 2.2 - Newegg.com
     
  8. 242424

    242424 AllStar

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  9. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    See post # 4.
     
  10. FLASAT007

    FLASAT007 New Member

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  11. Grafixguy

    Grafixguy Godfather

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    My experience is that cheap cables for runs of up to 15 feet are fine. I'm using no name cables that cost me $17 for 3 fifteen foot cables.
     
  12. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I'm looking skeptically if HDMI cable overpriced, over $100...
     
  13. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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  14. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Not sure why anyone would pay $345 for that when you can get the pair of converters I linked for $99, plus a pittance to run the cat6a cable. The fiber optic solution is really only desirable for when you really do need to go 500 feet which exceeds the range of other options.
     
  15. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Not sure if/how well it would work in an hdmi extension configuration, but you can normally extend ethernet well over most any distance by just putting an active (powered) switch in the middle. 300 feet -> switch -> 300 feet -> switch -> 300 feet, etc. So that puts the cost of an ethernet solution well below the cost of fiber for most any run (assuming it is reasonably convenient to insert switches along the way).
     
  16. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    well, Ethernet by rules support 5 segments max eg 1500' max span, only three segments may have nodes
     
  17. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    HDMI extenders aren't using ethernet framing, you can't extend them with a switch. You could connect the output of one to the input of another with an HDMI cable, but really at that point you are probably better off ponying up for the fiber solution. Almost everyone who needs to run HDMI 500' will be some sort of commercial or government entity, who will probably have existing fiber they can use (not sure if this particular product supports using your own fiber, but I'm sure some do)
     
  18. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Well, that's inconvenient. But then yes, you are only using the wire as wire, not as part of IP distribution. Oh well.
     

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