Which Is Better In Rain or Bad Weather DirecTV (or) Dish Network?

Discussion in 'General Satellite Discussion' started by DBSViewer85, Aug 9, 2019.

  1. Aug 9, 2019 #1 of 24
    DBSViewer85

    DBSViewer85 New Member

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    I know they Both use different frequency bands;
    BUT My Question is: Which Is Better In Rain
    (or) Bad Weather DirecTV (or) Dish Network?
    Has anybody
    on these forums had BOTH Services
    Over the years; and if so; which is more stable in inclement weather?
     
  2. Aug 9, 2019 #2 of 24
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Your location will dictate the amount of rain/snow fade you'll experience.
     
  3. Aug 9, 2019 #3 of 24
    DBSViewer85

    DBSViewer85 New Member

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    1.) Why is That?
    2.) How does that work?
     
  4. Aug 9, 2019 #4 of 24
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Water saturated clouds will block your dish's LOS regardless if it's raining or snowing at your location. If you live at a location that has frequent inclement weather you will experience a higher amount of rain/snow fade than other areas.
     
    ericknolls likes this.
  5. Aug 9, 2019 #5 of 24
    DBSViewer85

    DBSViewer85 New Member

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    So that's why the best states for the BEST Satellite TV Signal are ones like Phoenix AZ. (and) Las Vegas NV. Right?
     
  6. Aug 9, 2019 #6 of 24
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Best satellite signal, no. Least amount of rain/snow fade most likely.
     
  7. Aug 9, 2019 #7 of 24
    DBSViewer85

    DBSViewer85 New Member

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    Which of the Lower 48 States in the U.S. Generally has the BEST Satellite T.V. Signal???
     
  8. Aug 9, 2019 #8 of 24
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    As long as your dish has a unobstructed LOS to the satellites your signal strength will not be affected.
     
  9. Aug 9, 2019 #9 of 24
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    That being said, southwestern states have the satellites higher in the sky (not on the horizon). Arizona would be a good choice for best. But any state can have a useable signal.
     
  10. NYDutch

    NYDutch DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Which state? I don't think there's any practical answer to that other than selecting states with the least amount of rain or snow. We travel extensively in our motorhome, and rain fade is so rare that we don't even give it a thought. Even when it occurs it's usually only for a few minutes at most. And these days with so many streaming options, it's usually just a few clicks to reach an alternate source for the same programs if necessary.
     
    trh likes this.
  11. VDP07

    VDP07 Godfather

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    To answer the op's original question. I've had both systems simultaneously for several years now. Both are tuned to optimal levels. In my experience, while both may lose signal for short periods during severe downpours, it's not unusual to lose Directv's HD channels long before, or even without losing any DISH channels. OTOH, I've never seen rain fade on DISH when there wasn't also rain fade on DTV. Just my non-scientific observations.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  12. makaiguy

    makaiguy Icon

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    Another aspect of this is where you are located geographically and the resulting dish aiming angles. Whichever service's satellites are higher in the sky at your location will have a more direct shot to your dish. There will be less signal attenuation from the amount of air and humidity it must go through and less chance of the signal having to pass through a storm cloud.

    The closer to straight south your aiming angle is at your location, the higher in the sky the satellite will be.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  13. RBA

    RBA Well-Known Member

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    contact your local meteorologist and find out your precipitation forecast for each month.
     
  14. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    I have DTV and my neighbor right across the street, 200 feet away, has Dish HD service.
    Out signals go out at technically the same time when it rains between us and the satellites.
    Only a couple of minutes difference each time.

    It also depends on which channel you are on. Depending on where the rain is, channels on 99 might be on while channels 103 satellite might already be off.
    Lots of times there is a difference between my TV and my sons being on or off because of which satellite we are each using.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Best answer, as usual.

    Rich
     
  16. CTJon

    CTJon Godfather

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    I live in Maine and I find that because the signal is so low on horizon and thus dish is almost vertical snow tends to slide off rather than stick to dish.
     
  17. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    back years ago, I saw a map that indicated that Dish had centered their aiming from the satellites on NC - (you could get reception with a 12 inch dish in ideal weather conditions !) But that was probably only for 119 and 110.

    Losing reception - I can't say about DirectTV - I've never had it. OTOH - I have lots of experiance on Dish, both main arcs (Eastern (61.5, 72.7, and 77) and Western (110,119,and 129)). With a properly aimed dish and cables in good condition - Loss of Signal doesn't happen very often - and when it does - you usually have more important things to think about (like - where am I going for tornado / severe thunderstorm protection). This is exactly why I always try to have alternate means of getting local news stations (OTA antenna since I mastered that).
    Frequencies for the two services - the basic download range was the same for both DBS providers - back in the early days, you could actually have both systems working together. (Directtv had service on 101 and 119, with a couple of 110 , DIsh was 119 and 110). Today - well , Dish is mostly on Eastern / Western Arcs, but they also have 118.
     
  18. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    All else being equal, Dish uses Ku which is less affected by rain than the Ka Directv uses for HD. However, Dish uses a higher order modulation to squeeze more bits out of their Ku transponders than Directv does, which reduces that difference somewhat. So Directv's Ku should be a little more resistant to rain fade than Dish, but that difference is smaller than the difference between Dish's Ku and Directv's Ka.

    That difference between Dish's Ku and Directv's Ku doesn't matter much today since Directv is currently using their Ku for MPEG2 SD, but when they retire MPEG2 and use 101 for HD channels, Directv will be a bit more resistant to rain fade than Dish for those channels channels that get moved to 101 - but less on the rest, so it'll be pretty much a wash.
     
    VDP07 likes this.
  19. Kuclas

    Kuclas New Member

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    Shockingly. My directv (Florida) in Orlando area survived Hurricane Irma (2017) when it passed through as a category 2. All my pool screens were blown away. A big tree fell down in front of my house. But we never lost power (power lines under ground) and satellite never went down. It was amazing.

    But we lost satellite signal during hurricanes Matthew (2016). And lost satellite signal various times for thunderstorms.

    So go figure. A major hurricane we never lost signal or power.
     
  20. makaiguy

    makaiguy Icon

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    What matters for satellite reception is the weather between you and the satellite that can block the signal from the bird . From Florida the DTV satellites are roughly to your southwest. The heavy rain with hurricanes is typically in the northeast quadrant so depending on where you are in relation to the hurricane if the heavy storm is not to your southwest it would not be unusual for your satellite to be unaffected.
     

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