Widespread Competition to Cable Internet Ramping Up

Discussion in 'Cable TV Discussion' started by 1948GG, Jan 10, 2021.

  1. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

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    Way back in the late 1960s-70s when I actually worked for a telco, I told them at every chance that using copper instead of fiber to continue building infrastructure was nuts. They didn't listen. I went on to work for major equipment suppliers in the fiber field, for clients like sprint (pin drop), gte and verizon (fios), at&t, and alcatel.

    If the telcos had started transitioning to digital and fiber way back around 1970, they'd be in much better shape today. But they are emblematic of the type of thinking of regulated monopolies, where the thin profit margins are used to pay rich bonuses to the upper management. But eventually new technologies are going to eat their lunch, breakfast, and dinner.
     
  2. dtv757

    dtv757 Icon

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    I believe it was GTE in California that first tested fiber residential broadband in late 80s [87- GTE to Experiment With Technology : Fiber-Optic Cable TV System Will Give Cerritos Residents Look Into the Future ]

    Also bell atlantic video was 1st massive test of on demand early 90s

    So telco had the technology at bell labs. Wish they would have expanded their entire footprint to fiber .

    That way folks wouldn't have to suffer from unreliable docsis from the cable cos

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
     
  3. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    They didn't like being beholden to the power company for power to run their equipment. Now we're suffering the consequences as our phone service goes away with the shore power. They've discovered that they can blame it on the power company and that wasn't an option back in the day.
     
  4. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    The phone company can use the excuse of "the power is out" when the power is out at the customer's site. Power out at intermediate locations is harder to sell. The local telco uses battery backups and generators at most sites with a generator connection at the battery sites for extended outages. All part of the plan to keep service active. No batteries and no provision for alternate power is not a good way to keep service active.
     
  5. dtv757

    dtv757 Icon

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    I thought a benefit of POTS was it worked when the power was out. I always remembered folks saying POTS worked during Hurricanes etc...

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
     
  6. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    In the "old days" phone service was provided on a pair of copper wires originating at a central office. In larger towns and cities there could be remote offices with equipment similar to the central offices where the wire from the home or business terminates on equipment that carried the call back to the CO on other copper wires. A power outage at the CO or remote office could interrupt service.

    In more modern days remote equipment was placed out in the field. Large cabinets were used as the break out points for the wires feeding homes and businesses. When the telephone company began to embrace fiber those remote cabinets were connected back to the CO or a remote office via fiber ... but even before fiber the remote cabinets needed electricity. As noted in my previous posts, telcos used batteries and generators to keep their sites online.
     
    Glen_D likes this.

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