Will rural college sports fans be able to keep up with the broadband demands of streaming services?

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by glrush, Jan 5, 2020.

  1. Jan 5, 2020 #1 of 10
    glrush

    glrush Cool Member/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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  2. Jan 5, 2020 #2 of 10
    trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    Inside the article is this comment:

     
  3. Jan 5, 2020 #3 of 10
    garn9173

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    Lack of broadband is definitely an issue, it's coming to rural areas of my hometown in SW Iowa. I know a handful of Iowa St conference games this winter will be exclusive to ESPN+.
     
  4. Jan 5, 2020 #4 of 10
    CTJon

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    I think state university games should be available to residents of that state without having to pay or special packages. For instance, I used to live in CT - all UCONN basketball used to be available on local radio and OTA tv - other than "National" games. Now none of it is available on free stations.
     
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  5. Jan 5, 2020 #5 of 10
    ejbvt

    ejbvt AllStar

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    I am sure the radio is still there somewhere. When I lived in central NC, we got Duke, UNC, State, Elon, NC Central, Wake Forest, UNCG, and more on the radio. Here in VT, UVM is on the radio and even D2 (D3?) Plattsburgh State in NY has some games on the radio. You are right about TV, there are few local broadcasts anymore. ESPN is sucking it all up and it goes on ESPN+.

    Related to the thread, ESPN+ is a terrible place for it for reasons others have noted. Many of those schools are rural across the country and do not have good enough Internet speeds, and their fans are more likely to be local and thus also not the speeds. If it is not on ESPN+, a bunch goes to the Sinclair channel Stadium, which actually doesn't air that much on TV, most of it goes to their website. It is also often an OTA subchannel on TV and not HD. It does stream in HD, but once again it's all on the Internet.

    Then, of course, I am not a fan of streaming anything in general. I just don't see the point. And there's not the sports selection there is on Directv. And if many rural people don't have streaming available in general, how are all these stupid streaming services ever going to reach them in the long haul. We have the best system for delivering TV in my opinion. Is it perfect? No. Does it appear AT&T hates it and wants to destroy it sometimes? Yes. But it's a lot more user-friendly than streaming.

    Edit: I said "we" thinking this was the Directv forum, as I bookmark to there, only look there, etc, but the side bar on the right shows stuff from everywhere and it gets me everytime. It drives me crazy!!!!! Satguys is doing that now, too. WHY?? Anyway, I am done.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2020
  6. Jan 6, 2020 #6 of 10
    CTJon

    CTJon Godfather

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    UCONN radio is now ESPN radio - not the over the air it used to be.
     
  7. Jan 7, 2020 #7 of 10
    SamC

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    If WVU’s AD, as quoted in the article thinks there are only 400K people in WV w/o streaming quality internet service, he is more out of touch than I already thought he was.

    Ironically, the Big 12 when its ESPN+ contract kicks fully in next year, will have the most content on internet sites of any of the “power 5” leagues, but is made up of several very rural and thus internet challenged, states.

    For colleges, it is an issue. Wal-Mart fandom is baed upon of easy access to “your” (same words as on your driver’s license, no actual relationship) school on TV. Now, for schools like WVU, do they obey their masters at Disney, knowing that they are just not going to reach half their fan base, or not? Now right now, its not that big an issue, as it is one or two walkover football games and five or six basketball games, but in 10 or 15 years, when the internet situation is going to be exactly the same in places like WV, and it is all but a few games on the internet, then what?
     
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  8. Jan 9, 2020 #8 of 10
    B. Shoe

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    I think the answer to your question simply lies in who is able to provide more money; Disney, or another carrier?
     
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  9. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

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    I moved into a very rural area 5 years ago, but one of the 'must haves' at the time was decent cable internet. One mile in any direction from where I am and it was off the cliff. This year may see two competitors, LTE from at least three providers (two of which already have 5g up and running, but are currently being held back by lack of equipment from manufacturers on either 4g or 5g. The other is spacex/starlink. I was literally there for directv in 1994 in Indianapolis (lucky to be there when the rca plant shipped the first gen units), and was the first subscriber in texas two weeks later thanks to ups. My directv subscriber number was just over 5 digits. But it just became too much cost.
     
  10. wmb

    wmb Godfather

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    West Virginia's population is 1.8 million. That means over 20% of the population doesn't have streaming quality internet service. What's out of touch is recognizing the impact that has on the viability of streaming for small, rural college athletics.

    But, small rural colleges face issues related to being isolated from the outside world anyways.


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