1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Will You Lose the Distant Network Feeds? Here is what DirecTV Says

Discussion in 'Legislative and Regulatory Issues' started by Lord Vader, Dec 23, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
    With all the confusion surrounding this issue, I decided to speak to someone higher up in DirecTV. Here is what they told me (I spoke to three different people, each of whom told me the same thing):

    P.S. If something different happens January 1, don't blame me! :D

    I'm just reporting what several upper-level folks told me.
     
  2. gor88

    gor88 Icon

    596
    1
    May 9, 2003
    I hope this is indeed the case. I have FOX NY, despite being in grade A of a one year old FOX affiliate. I don't want to lose this distant.

    However, I seem to recall someone saying that SHVERA mandates that satellite providers supply a list of names and addresses of distant net subscribers in their market to each network affiliate. If so, couldn't the local affiliate demand the feed to be shutoff if living in the grade A contour? As it stands now, that would be how I lose FOX NY.
     
  3. cnacht

    cnacht Mentor

    36
    0
    Dec 23, 2003
    I was going to switch from Dish to Directv because of my frustration with the 921, and now I probably won't because I fear I would lose my Chicago Distants and CBSHD out of New York. I was told the exact same thing from a Directv CSR today. She also couldn't tell me if I qualify for the distant HD feeds unless I was a customer and filed the waivers. I don't think I want to spend the money to switch and possibly be shut out of HD locals altogether(at least I have CBS). I can't get the big 4 networks OTA, so SHVIRA doesn't do squat for me.
     
  4. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
    Try tightening them then. That might make them stick. ;)
     
  5. cnacht

    cnacht Mentor

    36
    0
    Dec 23, 2003
    I edited my post, but I wish it was that easy to tighten them and make them stick. It is hard to get Dish to stick to their words.
     
  6. Vermonter

    Vermonter Cool Member

    21
    0
    Nov 15, 2004
    Dos that mean that they will have their HD act together on Jan 1? I currently have locals but not the national HD feeds..even though we should get them as we'll be in a "digital white area". In investigating this a few days ago by calling Directv I proposed I lived in a distant-eligible area close by in the same DMA and should also get the same locals; however the answer was either distants + HD or locals and no HD..not both.
     
  7. Msguy

    Msguy Hall Of Fame

    1,572
    0
    May 22, 2003
    I have all the Distant Network Feeds from N.Y. and L.A. With the exception of PBS Channel 384. I have had these networks ever since I have been a Direc Tv Subscriber. I don't want to lose these channels. Why do they make things so difficult? Why Can't Congress pass a bill to allow people to receive distant Network Feeds. Local Broadcasters have rights i know all this. But WHY must they shut us out who are willing to subscribe to Long Distance Feeds. They need to be easing up on these Laws instead of tightening them. I know I am grandfathered in to keep my Distants. But there are other Distant Networks that I wish that I could Receive. I wish I could receive Chicago, Illinois Locals.
     
  8. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
    MSguy, as I posted above, DirecTV has explained that if you already have the 380's, as you indicated you do, then you will not lose them.
     
  9. Msguy

    Msguy Hall Of Fame

    1,572
    0
    May 22, 2003
    Lord Vader. Do you think Direc Tv will ever ease up on offering Only The New York and Los Angeles Network Feeds and allow subscribers to order and subscribe to other Distant Network Cities? Dish has done this. I know there are a few other Cities allowed for subscribers to view and Chicago's Feeds are one. I think Atlanta was another and Dallas also at one time was a city offered Other than New York, or Los Angeles.
     
  10. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Hall Of Fame

    5,468
    0
    Jan 15, 2004
    I don't think it was Dallas. ;)

    It was Denver - the ORIGINAL "distant" city, offered to consumers via BUD long before LA or NY came on board via PrimeTime24.

    It's a sad historical waypoint that a Denver-based company like E* is dropping it from distant feeds.
     
  11. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
    No, I seriously doubt it, mainly because the networks are essentially headquartered out of NY and LA, and those two cities are considered the primary sources. Everything in Hollywood--TV's and movies--centers around NY and LA.
     
  12. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
    With all the comments around here about waivers and all, I thought I should clarify a comment I made here and there about a good way to get them.

    First, be advised that under the new law, waivers are treated much differently than they were before. I can't go into that entire explanation, as I'm not the expert on that. What I can say is that if you truly do qualify for at least applying for a waiver, there IS a way to ensure you'll get approved ones. Clever is the Dark Side.

    Now, on this subject, from what I know, here's somewhat of a synopsis:

    • If you had DNS feeds and canceled them, you are now screwed. You will not be able to get them activated again, waiver or no waiver. Call it a "use 'em or lose 'em" scenario.
    • If you cancel your DTV or DISH account (and had the DNS feeds while you were a subscriber), then you cannot get the DNS feeds activated when you resubscribe or switch to the other provider.
    • If you are able to receive your local channels through your DBS provider, then you are not eligible to receive the corresponding DNS feeds. It doesn't matter if you don't actually subscribe to your DISH or DTV-delivered locals. If you're able to receive them--this is called local-into-local--then you can't get a DNS feed. Waivers won't get you them, either. This is a major difference from the old law's exceptions.
    • Essentially, the only folks who will be able to get DNS feeds are those in an O&O market for a particular network--this is for HD DNS feeds--or those other folks who currently have the DNS feeds (the 380's on DTV, for example). It is going to be very difficult for people who do not have DNS feeds to get them. These folks will be the ones who canNOT get DBS-delivered locals--an admittedly shrinking number, BTW--and have to request a waiver from their local station. These are the ones I can help get those waivers.​
     
  13. Link

    Link Hall Of Fame

    1,802
    4
    Feb 1, 2004
    If I recall, when Dish first started offering Distants, you could get New York, LA, and superstations in a package for $9.99 a month. Directv was still offering the Primetime 24 distant feeds like C-Band. WKRN ABC Nashville, CBS WSEE Erie, PA, WNBC New York, and FoxNet, KOMO ABC Seattle, KPIX CBS San Francisco, KNBC LA. Then the Miami court cases against CBS and Fox distants had those removed and Directv began immediately offering New York and LA feeds and added Fox West--KTTV 11.

    Then when Dish began adding more local cities, you could choose any city you wanted. For instance at one time I chose Salt Lake City, and received all the networks including UPN.

    Then they had to limit the distant offerings for some reason, and only offered New York, LA, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, and Seattle. I am not sure why but Seattle was taken off first, then Dallas was removed from the list. Now the very popular Denver (mountain time) distants have been removed as well only offering New York, LA, Chicago, and Atlanta.
     
  14. BobMurdoch

    BobMurdoch Hall Of Fame

    4,009
    0
    Apr 24, 2002
    The spotbeams came online at the time and then you could only channels in your general area (an east coast viewer couldn't receive west coast stations OTHER than the big five.... NY, LA, Chicago, Denver, Atlanta)
     
  15. slccm

    slccm Registered User

    8
    0
    Jul 29, 2004
    Lord Vader, here is a question for you about DNS. I've had Dish since late September and I was granted a waiver for CBS (NY), CBS HD (LA), ABC (AT), and ABC (LA) in early November. FOX and NBC denied my initial waiver request. In late November, I submitted a waiver request again for FOX and on January 3rd I started to receive the signal for FOX (CH) and FOX (LA). My status over on the Dish waiver page says status "pending." Fearing I may never get a shot at NBC again I called Dish on December 29th requesting a waiver and I'm now in the 45 day waiting window. Locals for my market are broadcast on Dish and I receive them. My question is will I lose FOX and will NBC be granted? Will the application requests that occurred prior to January 1st be of help because they were requested before the deadline? Thanks.
     
  16. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
    It's difficult to say, but you seem to have indicated that you did request waivers before the deadline. One thing that seems unclear is whether a request for a waiver must be done prior to January 1, 2005 or if the actual waiver itself must be submitted prior to said date.

    Have you received a response from FOX and NBC? Let me know. There's a way to get them to respond in the affirmative for your waiver request.
     
  17. rcoleman111

    rcoleman111 Guest

    The answer is that our congressmen and senators are taking money from the broadcast lobby and passing bills to protect broadcasters from competition. Laws like "must-carry" and SHVIA are examples of the influence of big money on politics. Until we start holding politicians accountable and throwing them out of office, this will continue.

    As to the "rights" of broadcasters, they are using the public airwaves to make a profit and they shouldn't get to make the rules. If the technology exists to allow the choice of distant TV stations and there are willing buyers and sellers, then why should consumers be denied that choice? It's like being told you can't read the NY Times because you live in Chicago.
     
  18. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
  19. slccm

    slccm Registered User

    8
    0
    Jul 29, 2004
    Lord Vader, I'm receiving Fox Chicago and LA as of yesterday morning. The waivers were submitted on November 29th (date listed on waiver page) and the Dish waiver page also states received January 3rd 9:00 AM status pending. If you don't get it approved it says denied. NBC was submitted on December 29th. My reasoning is the submission was done before midnight January 1st 2005, therefore if approved it occurred (submission) before the change (do we all need attorneys to get DNS service). Am I correct? Let me know how I can a get NBC to respond in the affirmative for my waiver request. Thanks
     
  20. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member DBSTalk Club

    8,758
    42
    Sep 20, 2004
    Galactic Empire
    No, you don't need attorneys. If you submitted your waivers, all you need to do is wait. I hope you saved copies of them however. As far as how to get a waiver from NBC, you might be out of luck there. The new law says that if you're ABLE to get your local NBC channel via satellite, then you cannot get its DNS feeds, and waivers won't be able to change this. Nevertheless, it doesn't hurt to try. Check your PM for more info on this.

    Never mind. I can't help you any further, since you don't have PM capability. You're on your own now.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page