Windows 10 Free Upgrade

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by MysteryMan, Jun 1, 2015.

  1. Aug 20, 2020 #981 of 1001
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Download was at 99% this morning around 10am. Install is at 83% 10+ hours later. And this is a June update that I would expect to have auto-installed a long time ago. At the moment I can't open any new programs (I was trying to open an excel and Windows Explorer isn't showing files.) Hopefully some of the quality improvements help.
     
  2. Aug 21, 2020 #982 of 1001
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Try using the Windows 10 Update Assistant.
     
  3. Aug 21, 2020 #983 of 1001
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    As even the intermediate patch Tuesday payloads are running relatively large fractions of a gigabyte in size, a lot of this depends on two things:
    1. Your broadband connection
    2. The fitness of your computer to run Windows 10
    Note that having all of your computers on the same release level and LAN can significantly reduce the impact of a wimpy broadband connection as all of the machines can share their downloads. Windows 10 features an optional built-in P2P file sharing option for Windows updates. I think it defaults to being active on non-enterprise versions of Windows 10. When it works, it can be a win. When you're significantly out of sync with everyone else, this can really drag down the speed.

    It has been my observation that the later updates beg for more than 8GB of RAM (Windows 7 can be a little pot-bound at 8GB as well -- especially if you run different web browsers). This is especially true for those who seldom reboot/restart and or like to keep everything running all the time whether or not it is actually being used. .net is voracious and it isn't getting any better as more applications use different versions of the virtual machine rather than native CPU code.

    Speaking of everything that is used, Windows 10 is not much different than other versions of Windows with respect to the number of installed (and even uninstalled) programs you have slowing it down. Reinstalling from scratch with only the software you're using still has a very positive impact on performance. I think overuse of the registry for every little program detail will eventually go down as being a big boon uniquely to those who sell new computers.

    Finally, because Windows 10 updates modify your system recovery partition (if you have one), having it on a slow hard disk can have a significant impact on how fast the updates go.
     
  4. Aug 21, 2020 #984 of 1001
    scooper

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    Oh god yes on the slow Hard drive. I had bought a new laptop, 16 GB of RAM, AMD Ryzen Processor, and 1 TB 5400 RPM hard drive. Slow as crap. Upgrade to a 1TB SSD - HOLY COW IS IT FAST !!!!!! Power on to Login screen in 15 or so seconds on Win 10 Home. Updates - well, I have a 500 Mbps Google Fiber connection (slowed down right now to run QOS on my router so IP phones work better). Upgrades / etc. run really fast now.

    I have also upgraded an OLD Dell Inspiron 1720 - 2 320GB hard drives. replacing them with a 500 GB SSD did wonders on that old beast as well. I think the SSD did more for speed on that than upgrading the RAM from 3 GB to 4 GB ( this afternoon's project).

    If you can - I'd strongly suggest upgrading any PC to using an SSD boot drive, and on a desktop keep a Hard drive for storage with the SSD boot.
     
  5. Aug 22, 2020 #985 of 1001
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Inexpensive laptops have always come with the worst performance hard drives. Expensive laptops came with drives that were equivalent to inexpensive desktop drives. SSDs have absolutely changed that but this can be a big problem if you're a fan of cheap laptops because SSDs aren't cheap and you typically only get one drive bay in a cheap laptop (or you lose your optical drive option).
     
  6. Aug 22, 2020 #986 of 1001
    scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    I don't know about that - my 1 TB Samsung SSD in my new laptop ran about $120, and the 500 GB in the old Inspiron was about $70. When they first came out - yes, SSD's were quite pricey indeed.
     
  7. Sep 4, 2020 #987 of 1001
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    2020-08 Cumulative Update Preview for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 2004 (KB4570721) and 2020-08 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 2004 Build: 19041.488 (KB4571744) have been released. Significant time needed for those wishing to perform a manual download/install/restart of these updates. Quality improvements only. No new operating system features.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2020 #988 of 1001
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    2020-09 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 2004 (KB4576478) and 2020-09 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 2004 Build:19041.508 (KB4571756) have been released. Moderate time needed for those wishing to perform a manual download/install/restart of these updates. Quality improvements only. No new operating system features.
     
  9. Oct 1, 2020 #989 of 1001
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    2020-09 Cumulative Update Preview for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 2004 (KB4576945) and 2020-09 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 2004 Build 19041.546 (KB4577063) have been released. Moderate time needed for those wishing to perform a manual download/install/restart of these updates. Quality improvements only. No new operating system features.
     
  10. Oct 13, 2020 #990 of 1001
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    2020-10 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 2004 (KB4578968) and 2020-10 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 2004 Build:19041.572 (KB4579311) have been released. Moderate time needed for those wishing to perform a manual download/install/restart of these updates. Quality improvements only. No new operating system features.
     
  11. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    2020-10 Cumulative Update Preview for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 2004 (KB4580419) and 2020-10 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 2004 Build: 19041.610 (KB4580364) have been released. Moderate time needed for those wishing to perform a manual download/install/restart of these updates. Quality improvements only. No new operating system features.
     
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  12. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    If you use the upgrade tool/wizard, you can now get build 20H2. I downloaded it yesterday on a testing machine.
     
  13. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    ATTENTION: Windows 10 October Update (20H2) was released on 20 October 20. This is a slow roll out. It is recommended you wait until Windows Update automatically offers this update on your PC.
     
  14. billsharpe

    billsharpe Hall Of Fame

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    I'm willing to wait until the end of the year for the automatic update. I did use MS Update Assistant to get the 20H1 update in August. That worked out fine.
     
  15. NYDutch

    NYDutch DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I never allow MS to automatically update anything. I'd rather watch the associated forums for problems first.
     
  16. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    In the grand scheme of Windows versions, Windows 10 would be a throwaway version until whatever follows after Windows 10x fails to move the needle. For the latest incarnation of Microsoft's "most secure ever" OS, Windows 10 has been something just shy of a disaster in terms of the vulnerability toll.

    Windows 2000 was arguably the only even numbered release that mostly didn't stink on ice. Windows 98se was pretty good and shouldn't have been replaced by Windows Me.

    I'm looking forward to a post lawsuit version of Windows 10 that does away with all of the tie-ins to a Microsoft account (and hopefully Cortana). I don't worry about being bleeding edge on my lone Windows 10 machine as I don't use it for much. My fiddling is done on Windows 7 Pro and all of the heavy lifting is done on various Debian boxes.

    Seeing the database-driven filesystem that was promised a long time ago would be cool but I'm almost afraid to ask what database engine they plan to use. I'm actually of a mind that Microsoft is consciously avoiding including a real database in the Windows distribution as it might cut into their Excel business where data goes to be miscalculated.
     
  17. billsharpe

    billsharpe Hall Of Fame

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    Except for a couple of non-MS programs the various versions of Windows 10 have worked well for me. I had to run Printmaster 18 under compatibility mode with each major MS update. This program is 10 years old, so I was not surprised at the need to do this.
     
  18. NYDutch

    NYDutch DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Since the current Microsoft cash cow is their Azure cloud service and MS has been building more and more Linux compatibility into their OS, I won't be at all surprised to see a Windows 11 that runs on the Linux kernel instead of the NT kernel. An emulation layer could be used for legacy compatibility.
     
  19. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    I'd be very surprised at seeing a Windows 11 as Microsoft went on record as Windows 10 being the last version of Windows.
    There are bits and pieces of Linux solutions to that already. Chief among them are Wine and Microsoft's own .net virtual machine that has been available on Linux for about three years.

    One of the reasons that Windows runs so damn slow is that most of the modern software is already leaning hard on one or more .net virtual machines. I hope being able to support ARM was worth all of the absolutely wasted resources.
     
  20. NYDutch

    NYDutch DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    There's a more hardware and OS's running on the Linux kernel now than on the NT kernel. I don't know what MS might call it, but if they want to stay in the OS business that's most likely the direction they'll go as well in my opinion. I don't think they'll want to devote the expensive resources needed to replace NT with a modern kernel of their own.
     

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