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Winter Snow Roof Install pre-order questions.

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by pstew21, Feb 10, 2004.

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  1. pstew21

    pstew21 Cool Member

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    Jul 27, 2002
    I'm about to switch to DirectTV from Dish and after having a dish 500 on the roof and installed about 3-4 years ago in the summer... I'm wondering how it is possible for an installer to install the DirectTV Dish and run the cables with over a foot of snow on the ground, and on my roof...

    I have 3 cables run currently from my Dish, I understand a 4th will need to be run for the 3 lnb dish from DirectTV? I want to get 2 Tivo systems and 1 standard reciever, so I'll need 2 runs of 2 to the Tivo's and 1 run to the standard, right?

    Can the installer use the existing roof/pole mount that my dish network dish is on, and only run 1 additional wire?

    Or am I missing something completely???

    Thanks in advance...
     
  2. jwwahly

    jwwahly Legend/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Dec 21, 2003
    Yes we can use the existing mount.Also here in pennsylvania i have been doing installs in the sub zero temps with anywhere from 6 inches to over a foot of snow on the roof you just have to be a little more careful. What i will do if i get shakey about a particular roof is knock some snow off and put some salt on the roof to give me more stable footing. Although alot of cust. think i'm nuts for doing this atleast when im done they are happy.
     
  3. DishDude1

    DishDude1 Godfather

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    Apr 12, 2002
    I will not walk on a roof that has any snow or ice, unless it is a flat roof. If I get out to an install and findout I have to go on the roof (side mount not possible, or not able to work from the ladder) it gets rescheduled. Not worth risking my life to install a satellite.
     
  4. jwwahly

    jwwahly Legend/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Dec 21, 2003
    DishDude I agree it is not worth my life but when work is slow I dont know about you but I can't afford to reschedule every job that i have to go on the roof for, although the thought of falling does cross my mind haveing three children at home is hard on the wallet.this is why when my father got killed last april i finally took out a substantial life insurance policy on myself just in case something were to happen either on a roof or in my van enroute to a job or anything else. I guess my work ethic is just passed on through the years from my grandfather who worked in the duquense steel works to my dad who drove truck they had the never give up attitude no matter what.By the way how much is it to get into Kennywood this year?
     
  5. 88fan

    88fan Legend

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    Jan 22, 2004
    I'm with jwwahly on doing the install if at all possible. With our locals just launched, I am scheduled with 2-3 installs a day through the end of March. There is no way to reschedule anyone. I'm also with the DishDude, whereas I will not risk my life to install somebody tv. If it is too dangerous, I'm not going to do it. As for the original question, it's all up to the installers discretion. But, don't get upset if he won't go up on your roof. Installers have families to go home to after work also. Don't be one of those a@@!#@le customers who think their tv is more important than someones' safety.
     
  6. Steve Mehs

    Steve Mehs Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 21, 2002
    Last week, in preparation for the DirecTV installer I shoveled out a small portion of my backyard so they were able to get out there and up their latter without too much of a struggle. Granted I didn't shovel a huge path since snow drifts were upwards of 5 feet in my back yard, but they seemed to appreciate it and I really didn't mind doing it. The installers tried to convince us to let them take the Dish500 down so they could use the existing mount, but I wanted to keep it up there. Can’t blame them though. My dishes are on the edge of the roof, the house is only one story so he didn't have to actually get on the roof, but it was could out. We offered the guys some hot cocoa but they declined.
     
  7. Strong

    Strong Icon/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Jul 30, 2003
    Simple kindness, consideration, and common sense goes a long way. This goes for both customers and installers. Of course this applies to sales, retailers, vendors, etc. and everyone else involved in providing the service, but typically the customer and installer are the only ones that actually come face to face.

    As an installer, to me, its a fine line between the customer providing too much help or too little! I guess some sort of check list sent to the customer pre install would be good, but unfortunately, its impractical in too many cases.

    I like to see the customer at least make an effort to remove the lifetime of knickknacks from around the TV before I get there, but I'd gladly settle for them at least helping me move them when they see me struggling to get to the back of the set.

    I'll never understand folks whose homes look like garbage dumps. I'm no Martha Stewart, but in 15 mins or so, my home would be reasonably presentable to a visitor. If I go into a room that looks like a tornado hit, I'm certainly not inspired to move their stuff to tack a wire down. If I have to step all over their clothes, books, junk, underwear to get at a connection, then I'll have very little respect for them or their home.

    It would also be great if they picked up the 20 years worth of junk from around the sides of their home, but again, I'd settle for them at least picking up the dog poop from the yard.

    It would be great if they sent the kids to grandma's for a couple of hours, but I'd settle for them at least telling the kids not to play with my tools or climb my ladder.

    There is a lot of dirty secrets in this business. As a consumer, you should know who is coming into your home, and what they are doing. Customers that sit on their butts until the job is done, shouldn't complain about things that weren't done to their satisfaction. On the other hand, don't nag the guy or offer to help with the bulk of the job unless he requests it. Guys are used to doing it themselves, and sometimes an untrained person can actually slow them down.

    Use common sense, if you are going to be out there with him, don't talk to him about your sick mother-in-law, or other irrellevant things. Most folks will try not to be rude and tell you to shutup, but its maddening when someone is talking to me about personal things while I'm trying to work. On the other hand, if he drops a wrench while on the ladder, hand it back to him!

    Cocoa, tea, etc are usually appreciated even if they aren't accepted. A can or bottle of water or soda that I can drink in the truck are almost always accepted. A couple of bucks for a job well done certainly never hurt either. Especially up there in the frozen tundra!
     
  8. jwwahly

    jwwahly Legend/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Dec 21, 2003
    Very well put strong and thanks for saying it comeing from another installer.Now if i can just avoid those uncleaned litter boxes I would be in great shape.You know the one where you need a gas mask to go into. :nono2: :grin:
     
  9. 88fan

    88fan Legend

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    Jan 22, 2004
    To Steve, us installers appreciate customers like you. Also, very well put, Strong.
     
  10. Grizbear

    Grizbear Guest

    Why not mount the dish on the ground...very easy to go brush the snow off or adjust. I am always amazed at the number of people who mount their dish on the roof, chimney, etc. and make it difficult to get at it, when they could use a ‘low” site. Must be that old “TV antenna” line of thought. Lots of snow here in Montana, but no problems cleaning or putting on the Sat “C” LNB.
     
  11. Steve Mehs

    Steve Mehs Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 21, 2002
    Good question :) My first dish was installed on the roof 5 years ago, and to make things look 'nice' that's where the other 2 went. We never really thought about having my original Dish300 installed closer to the ground, living up here though it would make sense. But usually we only get snow fade 2-3 times per winter but, so far this winter, not one occurrence of snow fade on any dish.

    Here's the pic from my D* installatio last week
    http://steve.dbstalk.com/images/antennafarm.jpg

    Thanks 88Fan, as I said I didn't mind doing it, and I know if I was an installer I wouldn't want to fight with 5 feet of snow and temps in the low to mid teens either. They were good guys and had a positative attitude even after leaving their previous stop, a 6 receiver-2 story install.
     
  12. Jasonbp

    Jasonbp Godfather

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    Jun 17, 2002
    When I had my TiVo put in, I just told the guy that I would stay out of his way and if he needed help with anything to just ask. He did ask me to help him move the entertainment center out and back, and to pull on one of the (old) cables to know which on to cut. About half way though the job, I asked him if he wanted anything to drink and he said no thanks, but asked if he could use the bathroom, and told him to go right ahead, I didn't care. He told me at a few jobs he had done that people wouldn't help him move anything, crap all over the place, once when he asked to use the bathroom at one job, the guy told him "he wasn't paying him to take a dump in his house."
     
  13. pstew21

    pstew21 Cool Member

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    Jul 27, 2002
    Thanks for all the info.

    I can't put it on the ground, no line of site. The current placement of the dish on the roof was the only place I could get signal for Dish 500.

    I'm assuming that if I can get both sat's on Dish, that the 3 lnb dish for directv should be able to get signal too???

    Right now there is over a foot of snow on the roof, and more in the back.

    It sounds like the best thing for me to do is wait till the snow melts off the roof, or best case, get someone to remove it with a roof shovel.

    No one has answered my main question, does the 3 lnb dish require that 4 cables are run from the sat to the inside?

    If so, then I'd have to clear out the current path that the existing 3 wires run to the basement along the roof so that the fourth can be run side by side. I guess that's probably the main reason I'll have to wait.

    Maybe there will be a better offer for the spring thaw too, :)

    Again, thanks for the info, I'll be on directv someday :)
     
  14. Strong

    Strong Icon/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Jul 30, 2003
    You will need 2 wires going from the dish to each TiVO and one wire going to your other receiver. So, you will need only 5 wires total. You will have to get a cascadable multiswitch from the triple LNB dish. Make sure you tell the installer that before he comes out as he may not ordinarily carry those types of switches.
     
  15. pstew21

    pstew21 Cool Member

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    Jul 27, 2002
    So 5 wires run from the dish?

    Wow, that's getting up there!

    Considering I already ahve a multiswitch, any chance that's usable for the install? or will I need a 5x8 multiswitch for this?
     
  16. SSW_Exposure

    SSW_Exposure AllStar

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    Jan 27, 2004
    Correct pstew21 -- you will need a 5x8(or 4x8) switch, with 4 lines running from the dish to the switch in your basement.

    The 5th line should be tied to the base of the dish so the installer can use it to climb up your icy roof. (don't forget to tie a knot every foot or so, otherwise it won't help much). :lol:
     
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