Wired or Wireless...

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Rich, Jul 5, 2018.

  1. Jul 5, 2018 #1 of 36
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    This question just keeps getting asked: What's the best way to hook up our equipment, wired or wireless? The question has been answered many times here by very knowledgeable members but it gets asked over and over. Here's the best answer:

    For the love of God go wired if you possibly can! A hardwired connection is always more reliable and much more stable.

    Rich
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
  2. Jul 5, 2018 #2 of 36
    RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    For the Genie's, totally agree. For the clients, especially if you can grab a C61W, from my experience they aren't as bad as some folks say as long as you make sure you have a good signal on the clients.
     
  3. Jul 5, 2018 #3 of 36
    FarNorth

    FarNorth Godfather

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    Can't go wired, Genie is on an inside wall. I really don't want to have an ethernet cable running from my home office across the floor to the TV. I have the dish on a hill behind the house, ran the coax along the bottom of the house, in across the ceiling of my garage and then up through the floor to the rcvr. If I absolutely had to, I could put a modem in the garage and run a cable up through the floor as well but I would rather not do that.

    I live in Alaska, don't really want to have a TV on an outside wall near a very bright window. Doesn't get dark here for months.
     
  4. Jul 5, 2018 #4 of 36
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Totally agree.
     
  5. Jul 5, 2018 #5 of 36
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Been a while since we've seen someone from Alaska here. How is life there? Any peculiar problems with D*?

    Rich
     
  6. Jul 5, 2018 #6 of 36
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    We could use some "pros" and "cons" about wired and wireless. I've had some wicked problems with equipment using wireless connections but for the most part what with the house blanketed with at least 200 Mbps down it's usually pretty reliable.

    Rich
     
  7. Jul 5, 2018 #7 of 36
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    wired-wifi-compare.png
     
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  8. Jul 5, 2018 #8 of 36
    carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    First off, I totally agree with going wired if at all possible. That is ALWAYS the preferred option.

    Wireless can work fairly well if you are in a relatively low interference environment. Your own house with plenty of space between you and your neighbors for example. Places where it tends not to work very well are high-density housing environments. Apartment and condo buildings where the only thing between you and your neighbor is a couple of pieces of plasterboard or sheet rock.

    The closer you can put the wireless client to the access point (wireless video bridge), the better. Putting them on opposite ends of your house is begging for trouble.

    Sitting in the basement of my own house, I'm picking up six wireless signals (2.4 and 5 Gig) on my cell phone. If I step outside, I see about 20. There are only a finite number of wifi channels, and as soon as another signal is on the same channel, it reduces the throughput and reliability you get on that channel.
     
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  9. dtv757

    dtv757 Icon

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    My setup is wired . Even all internet devices In my house are wired via ethernet

    But I do understand where some situations wireless would be better

    Sent from my mobile device using Tapatalk
     
  10. SledgeHammer

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    This. You should always use a wireless bridge at your entertainment center vs using the wi-fi in each individual device. If you are going wireless of course. A wireless bridge will have better / faster rates and can do stuff the wifi in regular electronic equipment can't. For example, I use a wireless bridge and the backhaul channel to the main router is 160Mhz on DFS channels and use MU-MIMO, so there is ZERO interference from neighbors. Unless your neighbor is an airport of course. Most of the time, they're going to give you wireless-N in equipment as well. The higher quality stuff might have an AC wifi in it, but it'll be a ghetto implementation.
     
  11. JerryMeeker

    JerryMeeker Legend

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    I use a wireless bridge in my equipment rack as well. It provides a wired connection to the AVR, Blu-Ray player, and the HR54. Only my TV and AppleTV 4K are using 5Gps wireless.
     
  12. repoman75

    repoman75 Legend

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    Question. I have the issue where the main genie always loses internet connection (and i have to reconnect from the menu). I have a WiFi connection.

    I can’t connect via Ethernet since the modem is 2 stories up (and can’t move the modem).

    If I get a WiFi booster that has an Ethernet out on it and plug it in near my main genie and connect it to the main genie, would that improve the internet connection or can you only connect ethernet from the modem?
     
  13. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    I would look at a wifi extender. Place it in the middle, one story up. I do not have one of these, and have not used one, but here is one example of something that might work: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MZMBMLX/ref=sspa_dk_detail_0?psc=1&smid=A12KYIM5CS8MDN

    If you can get a wired connection on the middle floor, that would be even better. Then just use this as an access point rather than as a repeater.

    Another option, which I personally don't care for at all but many people use them with no problem, is a power line ethernet extender. Carries your IP signal over the house wiring, with an adapter at each end of the connection.
     
  14. repoman75

    repoman75 Legend

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    Thanks. Why are you against the power line ethernet extender? I 'm going to try this.
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I've tried extenders several times and had no luck. I gave up and bought two Netgear Nighthawks and installed them and have had no problems since then.

    Rich
     
  16. repoman75

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  17. SledgeHammer

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    Powerline is terrible. You only get a fraction of the rated speed. Much worse then wireless. AV1200 for example sees a real world speed of about 120Mbps. You can get faster then that with an AC router. I mean a Wifi 5 router. Or even faster with a Wifi-6 router.
     
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  18. Delroy E Walleye

    Delroy E Walleye AllStar

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    I think the DVRs probably only really need < 10Mbps per stream, for whatever that's worth. (Regular HD.)
     
  19. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I'd bump that up to < 20 Mb/s.
    VOD has been 16+ Mb/s
     
  20. repoman75

    repoman75 Legend

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    CNET says differently but we shall see - they are ordered and I will let you know of the results.
     

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