Wired or Wireless...

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Rich, Jul 5, 2018.

  1. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    As it uses your house wiring, the wiring can become "the wild card".
     
  2. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    Did you read the review? They said they got 404Mbps *in the lab*, under *ideal conditions* with the adapters *10 ft* apart.
     
  3. joshualeecragg

    joshualeecragg New Member

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    For a new installation, what type of wire would be used to connect two 4K clients and 3 HD clients to a HS17?

    Building house from the ground up, all tv locations have two cat6 cables along with one RG6Q that run back to a sever room?


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  4. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    What you have listed is fine, Directv uses RG6 to the clients. The only thing you want to be sure of is that the coax from your server room to wherever the dish is located (roof, backyard etc.) is solid copper center not the more common and cheaper copper coated steel.
     
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  5. joshualeecragg

    joshualeecragg New Member

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    Awesome thank you for telling me. How do the clients connect, could I use cat6 or do they have to be RG6?


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  6. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    The clients only have a RG6 input, they don't have ethernet. There are ways to make that work using 'DECA' devices Directv offers that bridge between coax and ethernet networking if you REALLY wanted to, but it wouldn't be officially supported by Directv so why fight it if you are building the house and have the opportunity to put anything in the walls you want?
     
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  7. joshualeecragg

    joshualeecragg New Member

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    No I agree totally in not fighting it I just wasn’t sure what their method of connecting clients was! At my apartment we currently have AT&T U-verse over fiber, that goes to an ONT and then to a residential gateway, then to tv client devices via ethernet. Which we will have at our home for internet just not tv.


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  8. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    My objection to powerline is there is so much crap going over powerline now it can be almost useless for something else. Interference can be fairly wide spread. If you are (or might in the future) use any type of home automation stuff that communicates over powerline, it will all conflict and interfere with each other. Given there are other/better options to get IP somewhere, I prefer those options.

    With the right equipment, you can send/receive "wifi" for miles with true line of sight. Easily a few hundred feet through houses/buildings, etc. But the stuff you get at a big box store isn't "the right equipment".
     
  9. repoman75

    repoman75 Legend

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    It's not that I don't get Wifi throughout the house, it's that I keep losing the HD DVR connection to the Wifi - the system disconnects, reconnects, disconnect, reconnects. It sucks. Only an ethernet will do. So yes, I could buy another wifi router I guess and have an ethernet off that to the HD DVR.. but I'm going to try the powerline and see what happens - they are coming today!
     
  10. JerryMeeker

    JerryMeeker Legend

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    I tried the power line solution and returned it immediately. Throughput was anemic. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, I use a wireless bridge in my equipment cabinet that provides wired connections to all my equipment. The wireless bridge links to my router, the throughput is excellent, and the connections to the equipment are rock solid.
     
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  11. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    Yup. We've told OP that a few times, but he doesn't believe us... yet ;).

    I also run a wireless bridge at my TV and hardwire into that. Key is getting the right router for that. And I suspect OP didn't tweak his router settings correctly if he's dropping. Out of the box my small house had a dead zone where my phone got 0Mbps down. A few simple tweaks to the router and its maxing out at 220Mbps in the same exact spot (which is the most the phone can do).
     
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  12. repoman75

    repoman75 Legend

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    Powerlines work great. No dropping off an internet connection to the directv box. And speeds are good!
     
  13. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    That’s not the normal experience. They work sometimes for some people but far more often they do not work well.
     
  14. Delroy E Walleye

    Delroy E Walleye AllStar

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    From reading around here for the past several years it seems the genies are notorious for dropping their wi-fi connections.

    That's why I've never even tried to use it and always gone wired (CCK).

    Glad to read the powerline is working. (At least it avoids the flaky genie wi-fi.)
     
  15. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    My WiFi genie hasn’t ever just dropped signal... not sure if call it notorious. A few reports here and there but it’s not a massive thing that plagues all. On the other hand, he’s lucky his power line works. When I sold them they had about a 95% return rate for the simple reason they usually suck.
     
  16. b4pjoe

    b4pjoe New Member

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    I think the biggest problem with wifi dropping is by cheap low quality wifi routers. You get what you pay for as the saying goes.
     
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  17. FarNorth

    FarNorth Godfather

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    I use that setup on a cable TiVo that I have. For some reason, the TiVos available in Alaska do not hook up via wifi, only ethernet and without a connection to the 'net, the guide won't update. I installed a wifi extender, a NetGear AC2200; it has an ethernet connection out the bottom and it is flawless. Yes, I have both cable and DTV because I am a fanatic. I prefer DTV but I have the bare bones cable package 'just in case' my DTV fails before or during an important game. I disconnect after the Super Bowl.
     

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