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Wireless Extender

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by Norm, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. Norm

    Norm AllStar

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    Jul 18, 2008
    Hi,

    Is it possible to extend the range of a wireless router to a distance of about 300'? I live in the country and I am the last house able to get DSL (only get enough signal for 1.5 mbit). I would like to help my next door neighbors out and let them use my connection. I know there are extenders out there but not sure of the range. Also there are trees between me and them which could effect signal also.
     
  2. brant

    brant Icon

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    Jul 6, 2008
    linksys made an extender. go to their website and it should have the specs.

    it sounds like you're being very nice, but how much of your bandwidth do you suppose they'd take up?

    It may be best just to refer them to a satellite based internet provider.
     
  3. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    The quality of any signal they get would be barely usable, IMO. I'm not sure what the limits on CAT 5 runs are, but if such lenghts are allowable, you could consider just running a 300' CAT 5 cable from your router to their home. I defer to those that know more about run length limitations. If this works, you may also be able to then set a QOS threshold to prevent them from inadvertently monopolizing your limited pool of bandwidth. /steve
     
  4. dorfd1

    dorfd1 Icon

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    Jul 15, 2008
    cat5 length is limited to 100 meters unless repeaters are used.
     
  5. Oct 1, 2008 #5 of 14
    funhouse69

    funhouse69 Icon

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    Mar 26, 2007
    So I'm not sure I understand what you are asking here... You want to be able to extend your wireless so that your neighbor can receive it on a single system like a laptop?

    I think that 300 feet is certainly possible but that would require either some kind of amplifier and or a big antenna (Something like this http://www.l-com.com/productfamily.aspx?id=2967)

    Remember if you do this you are also transmitting to anyone else it out there so you will have to use as much security as possible which at that distance could also lead to some problems.

    Another option could be a Wireless Bridge Setup Like This which would be more directional. This would allow your two networks to talk to each other.

    If there would be a way to run a cable between the houses that would be ideal but usually that is easier said than done. Yes the length limit for Ethernet cable is 100 Meters so that would be right at your 300 Foot limit. I'm sure with high quality cable you can push that a little but make sure you have it going in to a switch (which will regenerate the signal) at the point of entry.

    So there are certainly ways this can be done but it all depends on cost, security and ability to run the connections needed.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. Oct 1, 2008 #6 of 14
    Norm

    Norm AllStar

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    Jul 18, 2008
    The thing is my DSL provider Windstream will within the next year have access to 6.0 mbit available to us. Right now my line is about 3+ miles away from the hub people on the next street over get theirs from a hub less then a mile away. Windstream has told us the will be moving us to that hub to free up space on the hub that I am currently connected to. So this would only be a temporary thing and the expense of installation and monthly cost of Satellite Internet is what we are trying to avoid. I used to have Direcway until a repairman for Windstream told me that even though I was out of the supposed range of getting dsl that it may be possible. I used to harass Windstream until they finally gave it to me. I was told that I was on the extreme limit and any further out and I would not have been able to get it. At first I was only getting enough signal to get 750K but recently talked to an installer and he somehow got it bumped up to the 1.5 stuff.
     
  7. Oct 1, 2008 #7 of 14
    LarryFlowers

    LarryFlowers New Member

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    Sep 22, 2006
    Several years ago, before Comcast destroyed Tech TV, Leo LaPorte did a show about his farm. He had a number of outbuildings, barns, etc., on the property that were quite a distance from the main house and he set up wireless connections for all of them successfully. I don't remember the specifics but if you drop by his web site at http://leoville.com/ and drop him a line, he can probably point you to the information you need. As I recall he used some hardware that was readily available and he was dealing with distances similar to yours.
     
  8. Oct 1, 2008 #8 of 14
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I miss Leo....The Screensavers was a great show.....

    I ran Cat5 to the limit once. A straight shot of 366ft. It was short term and only for one computer but it worked.

    The limit for Cat5/Cat6 is 100m or 330ft.

    If you terminate the ends carefully you should be able to run to your neighbor. No wires untwisted within one inch of the RJ45, the correct wiring scheme you should be ok.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TIA/EIA-568-A

    No florescent lights, high resistive loads(air conditioner, electric water heater, motors, etc) within 1m of the cable, or contact grounded water lines .

    Mike
     
  9. Oct 1, 2008 #9 of 14
    lee635

    lee635 Hall Of Fame

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    You are to be commended for helping out your neighbor. :)

    If your neighbor is on dial-up even a crappy wireless connection will be light years better than their current setup. As others have said a long cable run will likely create a more stable connection, but wireless is probably easier if you don't want cables running through your yard.

    I wouldn't worry too much about the security issue. You can capture the mac address of your neighbor's pc and setup the security so only that pc (or those couple of pcs) can access your wireless network. It's fairly easy to setup on the router, just check your documentation or the website for the router manufacturer. Also, there are some very tech savvy folks here to help. And if you're out in the sticks, even with no security you would likely notice that strange car parked out front with the guy tapping on his laptop.... :D

    Good to hear your story.
     
  10. Norm

    Norm AllStar

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    Jul 18, 2008
    I am not that worried about security. I don't really want to run that muxh Cat5 this will not be a long term thing, Maybe a year and a half. My neighbor is willing to pay for the equipment within reason. I guess I am kinda looking for can it done wirelessly, what I need to do it and idea of cost to do it.
     
  11. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    FWIW, I think the cost of the wireless equipment you're going to need will be greater than the cost of CAT 5 cable. You already have the router the cable will plug into. /steve
     
  12. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    You use a wireless that's 802.11g. It will probably have a "-G"

    The specs say it's good for ≈30m(98ish ft) upload and ≈140m(>450ft) down.

    All wireless routers run at 2.4 GHz. In my house, all our cordless phones were 2.4 GHz. They were stomping all over each other and unless I was relatively close to the router I would lose connection.

    If wither of you use cordless phones this will be a problem.

    I had to replace mine phones with DECT phones which run at 1.9GHz.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DECT

    IMHO, wireless is going to cost a lot more money and I'm not even sure it's viable.

    Mike
     
  13. funhouse69

    funhouse69 Icon

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    I know it is a little off topic but I've been through every imaginable cordless phone over the years and one day I picked up a cheap little 5.8Ghz Setup from Radio Shack of all places. I know they are made by Uniden and have been using them for years without any issues or interference with my wireless.

    Here's an example of the Phone, mine is a few years older but this is very similar.

    BTW - Microwave ovens are also known for killing wireless singles.
     
  14. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Not really off topic because it matters to the OP if he needs new phones to make this work.

    Typically both only 2.4GHz phones cause problems.

    Some 5.8GHz phones are only 5.8GHz from the base to the phone. To conserve batter life, the phone may transmits to the base at 2.4GHz or even 900MHz.

    A phone that's 5.8GHz in both directions or 5.8GHz/900MHz should not cause interference with the wireless network.

    If I'm on the back deck, the microwave between me and the router, sometimes it can be an issue.

    Mike
     

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