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Wiring a new house, need advice on heavy-duty set-up

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by Fruitbat, Sep 6, 2010.

  1. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    Outstanding. Also sounds like you have the makings of a smart home too. We want to see pictures when its all done. :D
     
  2. Fruitbat

    Fruitbat Cool Member

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    Actually yes you are right, although that would commit 8 of my SWM16 slots to just that closet, which only feeds one room. That would leave 8 for the rest of the house from the other side of the SWM16.

    My current plan sketched in my head has potentially 10 active receivers in the house. Not sure I will get that many, but its possible. 3 of those would permanently reside in the media closet feeding the home theater/sunday ticket room. That leaves 7 receivers scattered about the rest of the house... which means the 8 remaining runs from the other half of the SWM16 can feed the rest of the house.

    (on football sundays I just would move whatever extra receivers I need from various house locations to the media closet)

    SO yes I think I can cut down the runs to the media closet. perhaps 1 for direcTV, one for OTA antenna, and 2 spares is enough. I'd probably go with 6 just for the heck of it.

    Only issue would arise is if I ever exceed 8 active receivers in non-media-closet locations. Then Id have to completely split the SWM to 16 at the hub on "standard" days, and move som ewiring around and split at the media closet on "sunday ticket days"

    My hub in the utility room (with the SWM16) as about 50 feet away from the media closet. Will that be a problem with that long of run prior to the splitter?
     
  3. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    I'm not sure this will fit your plan but....know that sometimes it is easier to put up a second (or third) dish rather than engineering all the long cable runs and power inserters. You can paint the dishes. There are fiberglass rock covers what allow you to hide them in the landscape.

    Just a thought.

    Joe
     
  4. Fruitbat

    Fruitbat Cool Member

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    I suppose I could do that, but I don't see how that really helps solve any of my remaining concerns. Even if I did that, unless the extra dishes ran through the same SWM16, wouldn't that hose up my WHDVR?
     
  5. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    They're only "committed" if they're plugged in. If you unplug the receivers, the won't consume channels. It would take some judicious powering off and on to make it work.
     
  6. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
    Only one Slimline to a SWiM switch.

    I can't imagine that all the closet receivers are going to need WHDS.

    You may find that switched Ethernet works better for large-scale configurations as you aren't hampered by node count and bandwidth limitations.
     
  7. adamson

    adamson Godfather

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    Houston, TX
    My home and others I build now have cat 5 or better and dual coax outlets throughout. A TV or internet can be accessed on any given wall in areas, and just one in single rooms. Im not an electrician and did have some landline cat 5 terminated for ethernet for DVRS,ROKU, and Packet8 at my home. A few outlets are still telephone only.

    The endpoint for all the wiring is in the utility room. There are tons of RG6 cables all with connectors and all are marked for each location. I use a multiswitch to feed the receivers I need. There are newer telephone interfaces which include easier network access also. The one I have was quickly dated hardware in a short time.

    This all of course in new construction.

    MRV without DECA in this scenerio is all around a win win. Router is placed also in utility room and I use a switch in one location in the loft because I need three more inputs in one spot.

    Some electricians do now have some networking experience but not all and it is tough to locate those who do.
     
  8. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Correct,
    And as Harsh added you can disconnect and add other lines to give you the active sets / receivers you need. Sometimes seasonal uses or temporary guest arrangements suggest different uses for the equipment.

    For example if the kids just want to watch porn they are not going to want some news channel booming in on them.

    Joe
     
  9. Fruitbat

    Fruitbat Cool Member

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    Well I'm in the midst of actually getting this stuff installed in the house. I'll update and share my experiences at some point, but for right now I have a quick question.

    I purchased several long HDMI cables from monoprice. These will be used to run in-wall so I can share an HD signal from one receiver to multiple rooms. I am testing all of them before they are installed, and having a little trouble with the longest cable. It's 50' long.

    I am testing by connecting my current (Charter) cable box to my plasma TV. All the shorter runs (up to and including 40') worked fine (audio and video). The 50' run seems to struggle to send the signal. The TV will be blank for 10-15 seconds or so, then I will get a picture for about 5 seconds, then it will disappear and not come back. When I unplug the cable, I get kind of a "blip" of light on the screen, sort of like turning off an old tube television. So there is some sort of signal passing to the TV.

    I grabbed one of my HD DirecTV receivers out of storage and tried using that instead of the cable box, and it appears to work fine. I get all the "receiver starting up" and "checking satellite" screens crystal clear and they don't go away. So I guess I cant be sure that audio is transmitting OK (since there is no sound on those screens), but the video is fine.

    What could be going on here? Is it a bad cable? Or more likely something wrong with the charter cable box? Basically should I be worried that I'm burying a flawed $42 HDMI cable in the wall, or is this most likely just a problem with the source signal itself? Of course, its not really the $42 that is the risk...its screwing up that cable run while the walls are still open.

    Of course I am pushing up against the deadline for the drywall to go in, so I'm scrambling to get this stuff 100% figured out.
     
  10. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    I use a ton of Monoprice stuff, and spend a lot of money there. Having said that, Monoprice cables are NOT the greatest cables, they're just very low priced. For anything I'm "building in", I would only buy from BlueJeansCables.com as their stuff is a higher grade of cable and tests much better. It's worth the higher price (still a bargain).
     
  11. netraa

    netraa Godfather

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    Having built custom homes for 10+ years, your being very brave putting a HDMI cable in the wall before sheetrock.....

    i've seen tooooo many nails in wires and pipes to burry something that hard to get into a wall.

    conduit is your friend when your dealing with this stuff.
     
  12. Fruitbat

    Fruitbat Cool Member

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    well after a frantic morning and evening of testing devices and cables, I ultimately agreed with BattleZone and ordered some higher quality 40' HDMIs from Blue Jeans Cable instead. (I had considered that originally but decided to try the much cheaper monoprice instead).

    The two 40' ones I had from monoprice actually worked in limited testing, and I even got the 50' to work with some configurations. For example, the directv receiver I tested worked OK, even with additional small hdmi runs connected to the 50' monoprice cable. But did not work with the cable box.

    If I wasn't burying the cable in the wall with no way to correct the mistake, I'd roll with them, but I'm going with a higher quality cable. Or at least what I believe is a higher quality cable (at least they have been certified at this distance). I also changed one of my runs to I don't need a 50' run, just a 40' run.

    Now I hope they arrive before the drywall folks do....
     
  13. Eskimo

    Eskimo AllStar

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    Aug 2, 2010
    Did you use the 24 or 22 AWG HDMI cable from monoprice for your 50' run? I have a Monoprice 50'er going to the projector, and it works flawlessly, even with a "port saver" on each end, since that thick wire doesn't bend easily. You may have gotten a defective cable.

    The startup screens on the DTV receivers are 480 resolution, so they're not pushing the bitrate of a 1080p Blu-Ray, where you might have seen the errors previously.

    You could also look into the HDMI cables with the repeaters built in... those can run very long distances, but my bet is on a defective cable.

    Bluejeans stuff is good, but 50' isn't really pushing the limits...
     
  14. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Check out this PDF for how to prepare new homes for wiring for new technologies.
     
  15. matt

    matt New Member

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    WANT!
     
  16. Fruitbat

    Fruitbat Cool Member

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    They were all 22AWG. I didn't realize that about the startup screens. Unfortunately that's the only other way I had to test the cables other than the Charter cable HD box (which didn't work). I was up against the clock (electrician running low voltage stuff starting Monday) so I had to make a call and decided to bite the bullet and go with Blue Jeans.

    I guess I'd rather make a $200 mistake by over-buying cables than to put the cheaper ones in the wall and end up with performance issues. Probably didn't matter but I'll sleep better knowing I may have avoided that 2% chance of a problem.
     
  17. Fruitbat

    Fruitbat Cool Member

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    Very nice! I kind of wish I had the time to do this stuff myself, but this house is like a 6-month sprint trying to pick things out, all the while keeping up with work and the kids. My electrician is just using PVC pipe. He's putting direct runs from the hub to various downstairs walls. Also putting in a run from the hub into the attic, and drops from the attic to upstairs rooms. All terminating at open low voltage boxes. So I think I'm good.
     
  18. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Correct,

    To the extent that Whole Home Viewing is needed the separate dish will not help. This is for remote rooms and out buildings where the cable runs need to be boosted to work at all. It eliminates digging in cable.

    Want to watch a movie on a boat dock or in a garage?

    Just another tool in the box,

    Joe
     

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