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Working eSata Setups:

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Tips and Resources' started by houskamp, Jul 14, 2007.

  1. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    I have used standard PC drives in my DVRs for years. Never had an issue. I use Seagate Barracuda 2 TB 5900 rpm drives, and Western Digital WD2000EADS.
     
  2. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Jackson
    Any model rated for DVR use will work just fine in a PC as well. All the WD models we recommend work very well as PC drives. I don't quite understand the dual-use statement. The EURS, EARX, etc.. Western Digital models work great for either application. You know you cant take the DVR drive and plug it into your pc and watch the shows right? The only thing you can do with a drive from your dvr is copy it on the pc to another drive, or erase it to use as a PC drive...
     
  3. Volman

    Volman Godfather

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    By dual use I mean if I ever discontinued using a drive in the PC and decided to dedicate it to the DVR (or vice versa). I know all about the limitations of the DirecTV eSATA system-switching it from DVR to PC....or DVR to DVR,etc.

    I was just not sure whether a SATA HDD that WD advertises as specifically for DVR, streaming, 24-hour use, is somehow different enough that you would not want to use it in a PC......if, for whatever reason, you decided not to continue it's use in the DVR.

    Thanks, Fred
     
  4. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    W.Mdtrn Sea
    If not sure, use AV-GP line.
     
  5. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Jackson
    The "made for DVR use" monikers are just supposed to imply they are possibly more rugged and tested for 24/7 operation. Beyond that, drives are drives are drives....if it has the right interface, it doesnt care what you use it in....
     
  6. Volman

    Volman Godfather

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    That's what I would have guessed. But I wanted to be sure.

    Thanks.
     
  7. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    I think often it also means it may be a quieter drive than others in their line.
     
  8. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I see little difference between the WD Green drives aside from the EADS and EARS, neither of which is a "DVR" drive, and the way they lower the temps of the HRs, especially noticeable in the 20-700s. And some of them are noisy. I returned immediately one EVDS (a "DVR" drive) after installing it, because it was so noisy. I have another one that's noisy too.

    Rich
     
  9. Volman

    Volman Godfather

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    Rich,

    What is your preferred drive that is still available?

    Fred
     
  10. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Hi Fred. I'd try the EURS. I just bought one and installed it in my owned 24-500 and it works well. I have several EARS drives that work well, too. Just had a problem with an EVDS, but I think I got that fixed. I bought the EURS rather than the cheaper EARS just to try it out, never had one before. I wouldn't be afraid to try any of the Green drives. Try the EURS, it's $128 on Amazon.

    Be well,

    Rich
     
  11. Volman

    Volman Godfather

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    Thanks,Rich!
     
  12. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    You're welcome Fred, as always,

    Rich
     
  13. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    I saw the eurs was a little less than that on new egg the other day. Not sure about shipping though, sometimes it's free, sometimes it's not.
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I'd rather use Amazon, I'm not that concerned about the slight differences in price, but I am interested in the service you can expect from Amazon. Easy to return items that don't function properly and no shipping charges, with Prime, and no restocking fees.

    Rich
     
  15. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Newegg has always been good to me, and I am close enough I can do will call too. I like me both. ;). Those two and monoprice are my usual destinations for most things.
     
  16. Jul 1, 2012 #1896 of 2284
    tadc

    tadc Cool Member

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    Under most conditions you wouldn't notice a difference, but there's more to an AV drive than just that. The drive firmware is designed with priority of maintaining the flow of data ahead of the *integrity* of the data. In other words, a typical desktop drive will try overandoverandover again to read/write a block if there's an error... resulting in a break in the datastream. An AV drive will just drop it and keep on truckin' in order to keep the bits flowing, despite the error.

    http://forums.techarp.com/reviews-a...2-tb-hard-disk-drive-review-3.html#post357607
     
  17. Jul 1, 2012 #1897 of 2284
    Volman

    Volman Godfather

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    Ok,
    There is apparently a lot of disagreement over the differences. I've read other similar discussions to the link you gave.

    Bottom line, should these "AV" or "DVR" HDDs be OK for use as a storage medium for lots of digital photography images?

    Fred
     
  18. Jul 1, 2012 #1898 of 2284
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I've been silent about this because I don't know the answer to your question.

    Rich
     
  19. Jul 1, 2012 #1899 of 2284
    unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

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    Like most things, it's relative. "OK" varies from person to person. How valuable are your photographs? At a minimum you should always have a backup regardless of drive type. Note that a backup doesn't guarantee protection - if data becomes corrupted on a disk and then you backup that disk overwriting an old backup... everything is then corrupt.

    Beyond AV/DVR and Desktop drives, that most here are accustomed to, there are also Enterprise drives. Enterprise drives can also contain faulty data. If you really want to learn about the kinds of data corruption that can happen then read up on ZFS. In short, no single drive is safe for anything you place considerable value on.

    For myself, I run a Solaris 11 server with ZFS RAID1 and Enterprise SATA drives and my valuable stuff is backed up to a cloud storage provider to ensure survival in the event of a natural disaster. It's not as expensive as it sounds.

    To be clear, I am not suggesting that D* DVR needs to be that robust. RAID1 needs to be supported somehow. On-demand (internet) recovery of programs (in full HD, not SD!) lost during an equipment failure is an inevitable requirement.
     
  20. Jul 1, 2012 #1900 of 2284
    Volman

    Volman Godfather

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    This drive would be a backup for photos ONLY in an external enclosure. And the photos are also on a 2nd SATA drive on my PC. Taking that into account, would you do it this way?

    Another question, if some of the images become corrupted, what are the consequences (just a few unreadable images?...LOTS of lost images?....problems with the HDD itself? As you can see, I don't know much about this stuff! If the exposure to loss is fairly small, then it's no problem.

    Thanks, Fred
     

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