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Zinwell out in the rain??

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by PicaKing, Oct 21, 2007.

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  1. PicaKing

    PicaKing Godfather

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    Oct 8, 2006
    Installer was out last weekend to install the slimline 5-LNB dish and an HR20-100 to replace my 3-LNB dish and Tivo DVR.
    Everything is working fine, excellent PQ and signal levels in the mid 80's -100 on all transponders. Thankfully, I have not had any of the horrible issues I have been reading about here. My question is--the installer seemed very knowledgeable and was very nice, doing a very neat job. I did not notice until after he left that he installed the Zinwell multi-switch on the satellite mast which is on my roof. I noticed in the small instruction booklet that came with the switch (he left it here) that it says that the switch should be proteced from the rain. As I stated, everything is fine now, but was this a bad installation idea? Will things start to go wrong as it rains/snows, etc? Thanks fory your help.
     
  2. JDubbs413

    JDubbs413 Icon

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    Sep 4, 2007
    My Zinwell was installed on the outside of the house, I don't think it is a problem. Just make sure there are weatherproof plugs where the cables hook into the multiswitch.
     
  3. bt-rtp

    bt-rtp Icon

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    Dec 29, 2005
    Not correct. It must be installed in a wetaher proof box such as an gray metal box or inside the structure as per the user manual.
     
  4. JDubbs413

    JDubbs413 Icon

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    Sep 4, 2007
    Well it's fine as long as the technician puts waterproof connectors at the end points. The multiswitch itself is fine.
     
  5. bt-rtp

    bt-rtp Icon

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    Dec 29, 2005
    Suggest that you read the user manual. You can't miss it.
     
  6. mtnagel

    mtnagel Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 18, 2006
    Mine has been on my roof for over a year now and it's been fine. If it's easy for you to move it, I would. Or if you feel like complaining to D*, I'm sure they would send the installer back out to install it somewhere else (hopefully).
     
  7. JDubbs413

    JDubbs413 Icon

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    Sep 4, 2007
    I've got waterproof connectors on the ends of all my cables going into the WB68. Rain won't hurt it at all. I saw the manual.
     
  8. Mike500

    Mike500 Hall Of Fame

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    May 10, 2002
    Out in the weather exposed to the rain is BAD. Under an eave fastened to the underside of a soffit is better, as long as the cables do not tilt downward toward the connectors.

    Best is in enclosure with all of the cables entering and exiting at the bottom.

    At the very least, if left exposed, I'd cover the switch so that the cables are gathered at the bottom with a gathered sheet of grey vinyl sheeting sold at Lowes or Home Depot as shower pan lining material. This stuff is very durable and will last for years, even if exposed to the weather.
     
  9. Annihilator31

    Annihilator31 Legend

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    Nov 21, 2006
    Must be installed in a weather proof box? Please. There are very few boxs big enough to hold that switch and all those wires, plus directv isn't going to pay for those weather box's and us tech's sure aren't gonna pay for them. As a tech, I have installed ton's of switches and I prefer to mount them in the basement or crawl space, but if I put them outdoors I know they will last for at least a year, and as far as Dtv is concerned they only have a 60 day warranty anyway. These switches were built to handle the bad weather, just like the LNB's. Now, astetically they look bad on the outside of the house, but thats a whole new topic.
     
  10. Sharkie_Fan

    Sharkie_Fan Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 26, 2006
    Actually, boxes large enough for a WB68 are easy to find. I got a sprinkler timer box at Home Depot for about $30 which works fantastically...

    As to whether it's required or not... I don't know - I did it to camoflage the multiswitch. I have 4 cables going into the box and presently 5 coming out (with more possibly coming soon). The box I got was designed to use an indoor sprinkler timer in an outside application, so it had two holes in the bottom - one for cabling and one to attach the conduit for power. I use one for incoming wires and one for outgoing wires and my external installation is left with just an organized number of cables entering and exiting this box where they then go under the house and are fished into walls in my various rooms.

    At the time I was looking a quick google search also came up with several distributors of similar products which would work for this application.

    Again, not to say it's necessary, and not to suggest that D* or the installer should provide said boxes, but they are very readily available.
     
  11. JDubbs413

    JDubbs413 Icon

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    Sep 4, 2007
    There is no problem with having an external multiswitch as long as you have weatherproof plugs. DirecTV has been installing like this for years. If you want to put a box go right on ahead.
     
  12. Thaedron

    Thaedron Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 29, 2007
    If they barely last a year, it's probably due to being exposed to the elements. :lol:
     
  13. Mike500

    Mike500 Hall Of Fame

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    May 10, 2002
    It's a matter of ethics and customer service. More failed hardware means more profits for service calls.

    To me, that's unethical. The customer can go somewhere else, if all he wants is cheap. That's what he gets.
     
  14. Xing

    Xing Legend

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    Oct 1, 2007
    D* actually loses money every time they send a technician to a house or send a replacement box. So it would not be for "profit off service calls". The multiswitch can be installed outside as long as the cables are horizontal and not vertical and have the proper weather seals. The multiswitch itself is not going to be affect by the weather unless its not sealed properly. With all that said it is preferred and recommended it goes inside because most people would rather it be hidden. It also leaves less room for error on an install.
     
  15. houskamp

    houskamp Active Member

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    Sep 14, 2006
    Seems to be a pretty solid box to me so mine is out on the dish.. Just so long as it lasts till I can get a SWM8, I'll be happy :)
     
  16. tooloud10

    tooloud10 Legend

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    Sep 23, 2007
    Whether or not D* makes money off of the service calls is irrelevant--cutting corners like this to save money IS extra profit for their bottom line.

    Oh, and count me in as having my multiswitch outside with no boots or seals of any kind...installed by D*.
     
  17. Xing

    Xing Legend

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    Oct 1, 2007
    Anyone should know its not good business to "cut corners". I have first hand experience with D* cracking down on local installers for their sloppy work. If you call either D* or the local company they do take care of a problem install and would prefer it get done right the first time to save them more money. It does not save D* money to cut corners and have to have multiple techs out to follow up on sloppy installs. Not to mention the possible loss of a customer and the fact that it costs them more to get a new customer then to save/keep an old one. On the other hand it may save the techs money to cut corners due to they're getting paid by the job not by the hour. I agree this is not right, but my point is call into D* or you local company that installed and it will most likely get taken care of because D* is starting to penalize the installers personally for sloppy work and hopefully, in the long run, this will make them want to do their job right the first time.:)
    As far as your multiswitch, if its still in warranty, you can call D* and if you get a knowledgable person, not always the case, then they will reroll someone to check the install and knowing what you seem to know if he doesn't check it and do it right don't sign on the work order so he doesn't get paid.
     
  18. Annihilator31

    Annihilator31 Legend

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    Nov 21, 2006
    Personally, I would like to say that a box that would cover the switch, cable and connections would look great and if Directv supplied us with them, I'd install them, it's a good idea, but not completely necessary. I will start recomending them to future customers, but experience with people out here is, they don't want to pay for anything, even if it make good sense!
     
  19. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

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    Aug 4, 2006
    I have posted the quote from the install manual at least three times in the past year stating the WB68 must be installed where it will be protected from water.

    It's fine if people ignore that--doesn't bother me in the least. But rest assured, it is in there.
     
  20. Annihilator31

    Annihilator31 Legend

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    Nov 21, 2006
    Directv and most cable companies forbid us from using weather boots and rubber sealing rings as they have proven to actually lock water in. It didn't make sense to me till I started to see the damage. Comcast sent out a memo of cease use on these years ago. At the same time both Cable and satellite companies insisted on using Compression fittings vs. crimped. While these are not perfect, they sure are better. PPC makes a fitting that I love that has a built on rubber weather seal, but only a few compression tools work with it and I'm not sure if it really does a great job. I keep some on hand to use on switches requiring a power wire. Someday someone will think of something awesome.
     
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