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· Legend
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Silly question perhaps but what is the advantage of using HDMI with this unit? Does it affect the performance or abilities of the HR 20? I am currently using HDMI with my HR 20 and (knock on wood) have not had any problems. I have a new Sony DVD player/changer and I only have one HDMI port on my set. Unless I want to purchase a switch I am forced to choose between the HR20 and my up converting Sony DVD player/changer. If I go component on the DVD player it will not up convert.

Thanks
 

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From

Quality: HDMI transfers uncompressed digital audio and video for the highest, crispest image quality.
All-Digital: HDMI ensures an all-digital rendering of video without the losses associated with analog interfaces and their unnecessary digital-to-analog conversions.
Low-cost: HDMI provides the quality and functionality of a digital interface while also supporting uncompressed video formats in a simple, cost-effective manner.
Audio: HDMI supports multiple audio formats, from standard stereo to multi-channel surround-sound.
Ease-of-use: HDMI combines video and multi-channel audio into a single cable, eliminating the cost, complexity, and confusion of multiple cables currently used in A/V systems.
Intelligence: HDMI supports two-way communication between the video source (such as a DVD player) and the DTV, enabling new functionality such as automatic configuration and one-touch play.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
wmschultz said:
From

Quality: HDMI transfers uncompressed digital audio and video for the highest, crispest image quality.
All-Digital: HDMI ensures an all-digital rendering of video without the losses associated with analog interfaces and their unnecessary digital-to-analog conversions.
Low-cost: HDMI provides the quality and functionality of a digital interface while also supporting uncompressed video formats in a simple, cost-effective manner.
Audio: HDMI supports multiple audio formats, from standard stereo to multi-channel surround-sound.
Ease-of-use: HDMI combines video and multi-channel audio into a single cable, eliminating the cost, complexity, and confusion of multiple cables currently used in A/V systems.
Intelligence: HDMI supports two-way communication between the video source (such as a DVD player) and the DTV, enabling new functionality such as automatic configuration and one-touch play.
So a switch is needed for best functionality on both units?
 

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I think a lot of it depends on your display too. My 52" JVC has an HDMI input, but it still does a digital to analog conversion before the image is displayed. Anytime you do a conversion, you're going to have some loss.

Currently, my HR20 is my only device that outputs HDMI. My original X-box and progressive scan DVD all output component. If I had an upconverting DVD, I wouldn't hesitate to move my HR20 to component and use the HDMI port for the DVD on my JVC.
 

· The Shadow Knows!
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I agree with the above posts, but here are some other thoughts:

-If HR20 ever implements copy-protection for HD programs (as seen in Blu-Ray and HD-DVD) you will most likely need HDMI to use it.

-If you eventually plan to upgrade to Blu-Ray or HD-DVD, you will need to go HDMI out of them to get the best picture. (Why do you care? Read on.)

-Unless you've got enough inputs on your TV for everything you want to run, you're going to need some sort of switcher. Having everything HDMI will allow you to switch it more easily.

-HDMI (one cable) is much easier to sell to a spouse than 3 cables for video and between 1 and 6 cables for audio.

The downside: HDMI is a very new format and, as you may have noticed from reading here, it doesn't work well for everyone. For me, it's been good, few problems. For other's it's been downright wonky.

[Note: I started typing before btmoore posted. These points may be made in his links as well.]
 

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lamontcranston said:
I agree with the above posts, but here are some other thoughts:

-If HR20 ever implements copy-protection for HD programs (as seen in Blu-Ray and HD-DVD) you will most likely need HDMI to use it.

-If you eventually plan to upgrade to Blu-Ray or HD-DVD, you will need to go HDMI out of them to get the best picture. (Why do you care? Read on.)

-Unless you've got enough inputs on your TV for everything you want to run, you're going to need some sort of switcher. Having everything HDMI will allow you to switch it more easily.

-HDMI (one cable) is much easier to sell to a spouse than 3 cables for video and between 1 and 6 cables for audio.

The downside: HDMI is a very new format and, as you may have noticed from reading here, it doesn't work well for everyone. For me, it's been good, few problems. For other's it's been downright wonky.

[Note: I started typing before btmoore posted. These points may be made in his links as well.]
I have to disagree with you on the switching, component switching is a very mature technology far more than HDMI and far less likely to have any issues due the the HDCP component. If you play your cards right you can even find professional matrix switchers on ebay for around $100 these kind of matrix switchers can support both video, digital audio and if they have the appropriate board standard balanced or unbalanced audio. I use an AutoPatch 1ydm to take multiple inputs to drive multiple rooms. This allows any room to use or share any video source. I picked this up on ebay for around $200 4 years ago and it is controlled via my HTPC and Girder. That is a fairly complex implementation there are much simpler single output switching options.

Personaly I hope the HDCP component of HDMI dies, IMO it is just too complex and burdensome. I hope it continues to have problems so they can never truly disable our component outputs.
 

· Legend
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That is a delima I've also been considering. I currently have my my HR10 connected to my TV's only HDMI input (for HD content only, I use the s-video for SD). My Pioneer progessive scan player is connected to one of the component inputs. It plays fine but the Resume function does not work any more. If I decide to get a new player, I hope to find one that WILL upconvert on the component output.

I think as long as my player holds out, I will just wait untill HD DVD shakes out. Maybe I'll be in the market for a new TV then:rolleyes: ... 1080P, multiple HDMI inputs.....WAF of course. ;)
 

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jmbrooks said:
That is a delima I've also been considering. I currently have my my HR10 connected to my TV's only HDMI input (for HD content only, I use the s-video for SD). My Pioneer progessive scan player is connected to one of the component inputs. It plays fine but the Resume function does not work any more. If I decide to get a new player, I hope to find one that WILL upconvert on the component output.

I think as long as my player holds out, I will just wait untill HD DVD shakes out. Maybe I'll be in the market for a new TV then:rolleyes: ... 1080P, multiple HDMI inputs.....WAF of course. ;)
I use a Monoprice 5x1 HDMI switcher (with IR remote) with my HR20 and Sammy HL-R5667W with no problems whatever. One of my other HDMI inputs to the switch is an OPPO 571 HDMI upconverting dvd player. My harmony remote controls the entire system perfectly. So, I can now use up to 5 HDMI inputs, even though my Sammy only has 1.
 

· The Shadow Knows!
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btmoore said:
I have to disagree with you on the switching, component switching is a very mature technology far more than HDMI and far less likely to have any issues due the the HDCP component. If you play your cards right you can even find professional matrix switchers on ebay for around $100 these kind of matrix switchers can support both video, digital audio and if they have the appropriate board standard balanced or unbalanced audio. I use an AutoPatch 1ydm to take multiple inputs to drive multiple rooms. This allows any room to use or share any video source. I picked this up on ebay for around $200 4 years ago and it is controlled via my HTPC and Girder. That is a fairly complex implementation there are much simpler single output switching options.

Personaly I hope the HDCP component of HDMI dies, IMO it is just too complex and burdensome. I hope it continues to have problems so they can never truly disable our component outputs.
Oh, you're correct that component switching is mature and all other things considered, Id be just fine with component. My spouse is a bit sensitive on the cables, and HDMI was a win on that.

My point is that unless you are going HDMI you cannot play HDCP source material at the highest resolution. That's why I would recommend HDMI switching over component. I agree with your sentiment that HDCP, in fact all DRM is really rotten. There's now this possibility that in the future you will have to repurchase content you've already paid for-- not just because the technology changes, but because the original DRM provider is out of business.

I am pretty vehemently anti-DRM (as much as one can be and obey the law), but the question was why someone would go HDMI, and if you're looking to make sure that all your content is delivered at the highest resolution, HDMI makes it possible and component doesn't, the way I understand it.
 
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