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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new AT9 on the roof and will be running the cables from the roof into the attic and then down into the walls to outlets.
My house is surrounded by large trees with some being only 15' or 20' from the house. Since I have the trees so close is it really necessary to gound the antenna? If it is, since I will have access to the house ground (electrical outets and lights) should I ground to one of these wires or run a wire all the way to the crawl space and ground to the copper pipe under there?

Second question - Since I plan on running the cable into the wall through a box and then to a jack.. Should I just let the wire make a natural 90 degree bend or put 90 degree connectors on the wall jack inside?

TIA..

Greg
 

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The ground wire, #10 or better should run down outside of the house to an 8 ft UL listed ground rod totally buried with complying UL listed "direct burial" rated connectors.

You then can bond that ground wire to the copper water pipe using a #6 conductor.

You must verify that the copper piping is a complete conductor path and grounded to the main electrical panel. Water heaters, appliances such as filters and water softeners or any sections of plastic pipe must have #6 or better jumpers to complete continuity. The panel, itself, must be grounded to an 8 foot buried grounding rod. Since NEC 1996, just grounding to a water pipe is not sufficient.

From experience, I have never had problems with rg6 bent to as little as a one inch radius. I do, however use high quality rg6.
 

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Additionally, you'd be surprised on how many plumbing systems do not have the required 20 feet of buried pipe for a decent ground. Most outside water lines are plastic; pvc or polyethylene.

A lot of PEX. CPVC, or older polybutylene plumbing systems are installed in walls, in attics or under floors, with only the visible stubs and other sections being copper. This is happening more than ever, since copper has tripled or more in cost over the past three years.

Homeowners are led to believe that they have copper plumbing systems, when, in fact, they don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mike500 said:
The ground wire, #10 or better should run down outside of the house to an 8 ft UL listed ground rod totally buried with complying UL listed "direct burial" rated connectors.

You then can bond that ground wire to the copper water pipe using a #6 conductor.

You must verify that the copper piping is a complete conductor path and grounded to the main electrical panel. Water heaters, appliances such as filters and water softeners or any sections of plastic pipe must have #6 or better jumpers to complete continuity. The panel, itself, must be grounded to an 8 foot buried grounding rod. Since NEC 1996, just grounding to a water pipe is not sufficient.

From experience, I have never had problems with rg6 bent to as little as a one inch radius. I do, however use high quality rg6.
Mike I have a grounding rod just outside the house where my electrical enters. This is the ground used for everything else. Problem is, that grounding rod is on the opposite end of the house about 60' away. If I drive another grounding rod on the end of the house where the dish it at should I tie the two gounds together and if so what is the best way. Like I said I was going to run the wires into the attic and could tie to one of the electrical ground up there.
I hate to have two grounding points, but not sure I should run 100' ft of copper to tie into the orginal ground.
 

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An improved and upgraded grounding system is one of the best and cheapest investments that can be made to any home. As an ecperienced Master Electrician with nearly 40 years of experience, I would say that sinking a second grounding rod and bonding it to the current one would bring your system in compliance with all current NEC, CSA, and IEC standards. The latest edition of all codes require a second grounding rod spaced at least 8 feet from the original one and bonded with a #6 or better conductor, if the resistance to ground of the first is more than 25 ohms. Almost all new buildings use two grounding rods. Texas required two grounding rods at least 15 years ago, with the second outside the opposing wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mike500 said:
An improved and upgraded grounding system is one of the best and cheapest investments that can be made to any home. As an ecperienced Master Electrician with nearly 40 years of experience, I would say that sinking a second grounding rod and bonding it to the current one would bring your system in compliance with all current NEC, CSA, and IEC standards. The latest edition of all codes require a second grounding rod spaced at least 8 feet from the original one and bonded with a #6 or better conductor, if the resistance to ground of the first is more than 25 ohms. Almost all new buildings use two grounding rods. Texas required two grounding rods at least 15 years ago, with the second outside the opposing wall.
Stranded or solid copper? I will have to run the wire along the ground about 100' will that be ok? Or can I go through the attic or crawl space. It would be about 20' less. Also could you recommend someplace online to purchase a spool of ground wire?

Greg
 

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Greg,

Running the bonding wire through the attic is not ideal, since it will be in contact with wood or other combustible material. A crawl space might be better, but the NEC and almost all codes specify OUTSIDE.[/B ]Solid copper is better than stranded, although either is allowed.

Running 100 ft of wire underground at least six inches deep will be MUCH better. I believe that Home Depot or Lowes charges about $1.00 a foot for #6 solid copper, since the price of copper has gone through the roof.

I don't know of any on line sales, but I have several spools. If you need about 100 ft, I can do $.80 a foot delivered by Priority mail. Send me a PM, if you are interested.

Mike
 
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