DBSTalk Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
Eh, I don't think NBCU's Peacock is hitting it out of the park so far and it's under pressure to prove itself in the next year or so, I'd say. It could potentially become more attractive in the future. Right now, Universal has an exclusive longstanding deal in place with HBO for the pay-1 window for their movies. That deal expires at the end of this year, but will NBCU forego another lucrative licensing deal (whether with HBO Max, Netflix, or whomever) in order to keep their post-'21 theatrical releases exclusive to Peacock? Meanwhile, you can still watch all NBC shows next-day on both Hulu and Peacock. It's unclear whether that will remain in place until 2022 or 2024. Anyhow, at some point in the future, current NBC shows will leave Hulu and become exclusive to Peacock. But in the meantime, you don't need Peacock for current NBC shows and Peacock isn't delivering any recent movies. Peacock has a few originals but it's mainly a lot of old shows and movies. The Office is really it's main attraction. If you're getting Peacock Premium free with your TV or broadband service from Comcast or Cox, then fine. But for $5/mo, it seems underwhelming in comparison with Hulu at $6/mo.
I keep seeing people say this and it is just not true for all NBC shows being on Peacock the next day. One example is The Blacklist that doesn't make it to Peacock for a week. And last time I checked Dateline it was the same thing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
OK, fine, there are a couple of exceptions to the rule. But in general, Peacock Premium has next-day access both new and returning NBC series, much the same as Hulu. (The Blacklist appears to be a special case, maybe because of its deal with Netflix. Peacock only shows five recent episodes at a time, but always lagging a week, while Hulu doesn't have the show at all unless you have their live TV add-on.) And FWIW, last Friday's episode of Dateline shows up in Peacock Premium for me right now. Although I have no idea if it appeared next-day (i.e. last Sat.).
I don't think the Blacklist thing is because of Netflix who don't have any episodes of the current season. I think it is an NBC thing because you can watch it next day on the regular NBC app with commercials you can't FF through.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
Plus the world isn't so in love with Chip and Joanna Gaines like they once were. Right now about 50% of airtime on their network is old reruns of Fixer Upper. The only time I watch their network is when Maine Cabin Masters, Restoring Galveston, or Barnwood Builders is on. All holdovers from DIY.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
It does seem risky to combine both services. Existing prices with ads is $9.99 and $4.99. TOTAL: $14.98. Ad-free is $14.99 and $6.99. TOTAL: $21.98. The people that only subscribe to HBO Max, about 50 million people, might just not subscribe at all for example if they subscribe to ad free currently at $14.99 and that price is going to jump to around $21.98 per month because Discovery content is included which is not content they ever wanted. Same for people that only subscribe to Discovery+. They surely won't want to pay more for a service that has HBO if they never wanted HBO. I don't see how they will ever make the price of both services any cheaper than the combined cost right now. That would be a price reduction which is unheard of in today's world. By the time it rolls around in 2023 I can see them wanting $24.99 for the combined service. The smart thing to do would be to keep it as is but that is not what they are planning.

And what happens with the DirecTV Premier package that includes HBO Max. Would it include the new HBO/D+ combined content?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
Right now both services have around 100 million subscribers. If they do indeed cannibalize HBO Max like in your example exprect that number to decrease dramatically. While their new ad-supported free version of streaming will help it will still lose overall in my opinion. HBO Max is doing pretty well the way it is. If it ain't broke don't fix it. And yet they most surely will.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,381 Posts
Are HBO Max streaming subscribers split out separately from HBO MVPD subscribers?
I would think not. A subscriber is a subscriber no matter where they come from. The more subscribers you can claim the better. Who knows for sure though?

I receive HBO Max as part of my DISH subscription ... I generally watch the content via the channels on DISH (which are not the complete linear lineup). DIRECTV subscribers also receive HBO Max as part of their subscription to the linear satellite channels. They may or may not ever touch the streaming content. HBO Max has been bundled with linear on other MVPDs as well.
I get HBO through DirecTV and am just the opposite. I exclusively watch it on the streaming app on an ATV.

If HBO Max is stripped of content (requiring a subscription to the new Time Warner Discovery streaming service) I may not notice (since I have streamed little content separate from the OnDemand library available via the DISH receiver). I have gone directly to HBO Max's service for some content. For subscribers like me, we may never notice any change in HBO Max as long as the major content stays (currently linear movies and produced for HBO content). Losing content I did not know I had access to is not a loss.
Would you notice if the price goes up because they added content you don't necessarily want (Discovery+)?
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top