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· Godfather
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1,020 Posts
Four including Sunday night. Five on Sunday two weeks per year (including Sunday night). There are more games being played than years ago (which is why the Sunday Ticket count remains close to 15 years ago).

Back in the day you might have missed one of the three afternoon games due to a blackout protecting the in market team. Having only one afternoon game would be rare. Were the missing game on Sunday Ticket? If the blackout was due to protecting an in market team's broadcast one would probably get the out of market game. But if the blackout was to protect ticket sales would that game not be on Sunday Ticket?
Having lived in the NYC DMA back in those days, we were subjected to the rules for the Giants and Jets. One was home, meaning no game being televised against it, and the other away. That was all we got on many Sundays. The league always scheduled them to play at different time so back then it was 1:00 and 4:00.

A couple of side notes here to prove I'm really old :)

Way back in the pre-cable early 1970's all home games were blacked out. My dad put a big rotating antenna on the roof to pick up the Philly stations which would televise the Giants when the Eagles were home and blacked out. The picture was a bit "snowy" but very watchable. We felt like we were really beating the system.

Fast forward to 1990 when I got sick of depending on local broadcasts, I put a 10-foot dish in my backyard to expand my viewing options. That was a true eye-opener. Backhauls and wild feeds were a blast. Every football game on Sunday, too. Then came Sunday Ticket via C / Ku band for a few years before it all moved to Directv.
 

· Mentor
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589 Posts
Fast forward to 1990 when I got sick of depending on local broadcasts, I put a 10-foot dish in my backyard to expand my viewing options. That was a true eye-opener. Backhauls and wild feeds were a blast. Every football game on Sunday, too. Then came Sunday Ticket via C / Ku band for a few years before it all moved to Directv.
I was a nerdy little kid who kept a whole notebook of transponders and channel descriptions, with shows and local commercials I'd see, because we didn't have any sort of printable TV guide. (It was the late 80's. We made due.) Commercial-free, raw broadcast feeds. Hearing the announcers off-air. Finding almost anything you wanted if you knew where to look. It was a wild time.
 

· Super Moderator
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54,190 Posts
It was a wild time.
Literally. "Wild feeds." :D

Not intended for direct reception by consumers. Initially not a big deal but as the number of consumers with dishes grew programmers realized that they had to protect their content. Encryption and subscriptions followed. That is the point where I walked away from C-Band ... nice for the "hobby" and still unencrypted wild feeds but if I am going to pay for content it might as well be through a cable or DBS provider with a lot easier system than a dish that had to move to change channels. (A situation that improved as satellites were consolidated.)
 

· Godfather
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868 Posts
Way back in the pre-cable early 1970's all home games were blacked out.
Growing up in south Florida in the early 70s, it seemed the Dolphins were routinely within 2,000 seats of a sell out. When that happened, someone, I think the local station that would carry the game, bought the rest of the tickets by the deadline to be able to broadcast the game. Not sure what they did with the tickets.

As for local broadcast on Sunday Ticket… it seemed that DirecTV would map the local broadcast channel to the Sunday Ticket channel so the game could be watched on both the local and 700 channel. But, it’s been 7 or 8 years since I had Sunday Ticket.


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· Hall Of Fame
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1,753 Posts
If you have YTTV, you will get all of the Sunday games, either on a local channel or on NFLST.
That should say "if you have the Google/YouTube NFL Sunday Ticket package (along with a way to receive local channels)." By all accounts, it will be something separate from YTTV.
 

· Registered
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1,162 Posts
That should say "if you have the Google/YouTube NFL Sunday Ticket package (along with a way to receive local channels)." By all accounts, it will be something separate from YTTV.
Youtube TV includes local channels. If you have YTTV and subscribe to NFLST, you will have exactly what I said - access to all of the Sunday games. And Youtube has already confirmed that YTTV subscribers with NFLST will be able to DVR the games, which means it will not be "separate from YTTV" for those subscribers.
 

· Godfather
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1,020 Posts
Growing up in south Florida in the early 70s, it seemed the Dolphins were routinely within 2,000 seats of a sell out. When that happened, someone, I think the local station that would carry the game, bought the rest of the tickets by the deadline to be able to broadcast the game. Not sure what they did with the tickets.

As for local broadcast on Sunday Ticket… it seemed that DirecTV would map the local broadcast channel to the Sunday Ticket channel so the game could be watched on both the local and 700 channel. But, it’s been 7 or 8 years since I had Sunday Ticket.


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That was after the NFL allowed sold-out games to be televised locally. I was referring to the days before that when all home games were blacked out. No exceptions.
 

· Registered
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That was after the NFL allowed sold-out games to be televised locally. I was referring to the days before that when all home games were blacked out. No exceptions.
Legislation passed by Congress in the early '70s is what stopped the blackouts of all home games, including the playoffs and Super Bowl. The NFL opposed the law but had no choice but to comply. The law was allowed to expire after three years, but the NFL kept the policy in place and local games continued to be televised as long as they were sold out 3 days in advance. It was only in the past few years that the NFL stopped blacking out games that are not sold out.
 

· Super Moderator
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54,190 Posts
Billions of dollars paid by the broadcast partners helped influence that decision.

The current and future broadcast network contracts are very OTA friendly ... with the NFL now requiring an OTA presence for both teams in their home markets (even for Amazon Prime games) instead of prohibiting broadcast in the market where the game was played.

In the 2022 season that meant approximately 87 games (32%) were available OTA to any given viewer. The Amazon TNF, NFL Network and ESPN games were available OTA in the home market of both teams. The only reduction in the 87 games seen OTA would have been due to conflicts with an in market game broadcast that further protected the broadcaster's investment in NFL content.

Certainly a change from the days where stadiums were protected from OTA broadcasts. A good change for the viewers.
 

· Premium Member
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4,079 Posts
No it won't. Just as Sunday Ticket was once a DirecTV thing, it's now a YTTV thing. Google didn't pay all that money to create "something separate".
You do not have to have Youtube TV (YTTV) to get NFL Sunday Ticket next year. You will be able to go to youtube.com and buy the NFL Sunday Ticket Primetime channel to get it without having Youtube TV (YTTV).
 

· Mentor
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589 Posts
You do not have to have Youtube TV (YTTV) to get NFL Sunday Ticket next year. You will be able to go to youtube.com and buy the NFL Sunday Ticket Primetime channel to get it without having Youtube TV (YTTV).
We need to somehow make this the very first thing you see on this entire forum for the next 12-18 months, because no matter how many times it gets answered, someone is not going to know.
 

· AllStar
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116 Posts
I was a nerdy little kid who kept a whole notebook of transponders and channel descriptions, with shows and local commercials I'd see, because we didn't have any sort of printable TV guide. (It was the late 80's. We made due.) Commercial-free, raw broadcast feeds. Hearing the announcers off-air. Finding almost anything you wanted if you knew where to look. It was a wild time.
There were two printed guides available- ON Sat and Satellite News was the other.
On Sat was great since wild feed times were listed and transponder numbers etc.
Watched many shows two weeks ahead of broadcast days and times.
Star Trek TNG was one my son and I always sat down and watched together with gaps for local commercials to be inserted etc.
Gulf war broadcasts were done on site with open mikes and reporters running for their lives from the Scud missles.
Miss all that stuff.
 

· Hall Of Fame
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8,756 Posts
I was a nerdy little kid who kept a whole notebook of transponders and channel descriptions, with shows and local commercials I'd see, because we didn't have any sort of printable TV guide. (It was the late 80's. We made due.) Commercial-free, raw broadcast feeds. Hearing the announcers off-air. Finding almost anything you wanted if you knew where to look. It was a wild time.
There were two printed guides available- ON Sat and Satellite News was the other.
On Sat was great since wild feed times were listed and transponder numbers etc.
Watched many shows two weeks ahead of broadcast days and times.
Star Trek TNG was one my son and I always sat down and watched together with gaps for local commercials to be inserted etc.
Gulf war broadcasts were done on site with open mikes and reporters running for their lives from the Scud missles.
Miss all that stuff.
Yeah, the good ole days of watching TV.
 

· Mentor
Joined
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589 Posts
There were two printed guides available- ON Sat and Satellite News was the other.
On Sat was great since wild feed times were listed and transponder numbers etc.
Watched many shows two weeks ahead of broadcast days and times.
Star Trek TNG was one my son and I always sat down and watched together with gaps for local commercials to be inserted etc.
Gulf war broadcasts were done on site with open mikes and reporters running for their lives from the Scud missles.
Miss all that stuff.
I think my aunt and uncle might have subscribed to one of those publications. I can recall finding a raw feed of Saturday morning commercials. Assuming these were what local stations would record and air later in the morning. We'd be up and at it by 6AM. Cartoons, no commercials except for a quick fade out/fade in where spots were inserted. Maybe one minute of color bars between the programs. At age 9, it was about as good as life could get on a Saturday morning.
 

· Registered
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6 Posts
Hell yes those were great days.
Videocipher boxes with cloned chips.
Pd $400 for 12 months and could watch everything.
12 ft dish on a pole and worked great.
I'm 74 now and son is 42.
Watching Flyers vs Oilers Stanley Cup finals was a hell of a thing then watching from Nashville.
CBC and local Philly station backhaul.
Saw Bobby Clarke win the cup with Parent in goal.
Miss all of that stuff.
 

· Icon
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1,075 Posts
Hell yes those were great days.
Videocipher boxes with cloned chips.
Pd $400 for 12 months and could watch everything.
12 ft dish on a pole and worked great.
I'm 74 now and son is 42.
Watching Flyers vs Oilers Stanley Cup finals was a hell of a thing then watching from Nashville.
CBC and local Philly station backhaul.
Saw Bobby Clarke win the cup with Parent in goal.
Miss all of that stuff.
Those were, indeed, the wild (pun intended) days of satellite TV!
Anyone remember Bob Cooper of Coops Satellite Digest, or Shaun Kenny of Boresight News/Yellow Rain/Greensheet "fame?"
 
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