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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have a slimline with 4 coax runs coming off, to two H20s, and two SD receivers. i just bought an HR20 off solidsignal to replace one of the H20s, and intend on using it (for now) as a single tuner DVR. i would like to eventually maybe use both tuners (but only have one coax run going to the area) and may also want to switch one of the SD receivers to a SD DVR in the future.

i don't really understand how the multiswitch functions, so i was hoping someone had a good thread as a reference (searching 'multiswitch' didnt help much).

do the existing 4 coax runs plug into the SWM, and then if i wanted to use 2 tuners on the new HR20, just put a two-way splitter between the wall outlet and the HR20, one to each satellite input?

TIA.
 

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AllStar
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Yes you would need a swm8. All 4 lines from the LNB go in to it then one cable goes into the swm from the PI (power inverter) and then the output side of the PI you use power passing splitters to each cable run, at the receiver end you use another power passing splitter and then run a line to each input on the reciever. They make a 4 way power passing dplitter that the line fron the PI goes into and then all you need to do is connect each run to it.
 

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It's a power inserter.

And if you use an SWM, be it an external SWM-8 or the new SWMLine (slimline dish with SWM built-in), you only need a single cable going from the 'source' (dish or switch) the the HR2x. One of the Sat-In is marked as "SWM" or "FTM" - you plug the single cable into that, and on re-boot the HR2x recognizes the presence of the feed from an SWM - and feeds both tuners from the single cable. No splitters are needed unless you're going to run another HR2x (or H2x receiver) off the same source line.
 

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SWM may not be supported by your SD receivers, so it might either require the external SWM-8 multiswitch, which has 3 non-SWM "legacy" ports for SD receivers, or going with a standard multiswitch.

With a standard multiswitch, the 4 lines from the dish go into the top of the switch, and then you run a direct line from one of the switch's 8 outputs to each tuner. This would mean running an extra line for the 2nd tuner on the HR20.

With a SWM-8, all that is needed is to get a single coax to each receiver, even dual-tuner receivers like the HR20, so you do NOT have to split again at the receiver or have 2 lines plugged in to it. A high-frequency-capable cable splitter is used to split the cable as necessary to get a coax to each receiver. Receivers connected to the legacy ports must have a direct, unsplit line, and will only get 101, 110, and 119 signals.

The only SD receivers that are SWM-capable are D12 receivers and R16 DVRs (and R22 DVRs in a few markets). Anything else has to use the legacy ports.
 

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mishawaka said:
...(but only have one coax run going to the area) and may also want to switch one of the SD receivers to a SD DVR in the future.
Feeding a dual tuner DVR with only one coax feed required the use of the SWM. The single coax requirement takes the WB68 multiswitch out of consideration for you.
mishawaka said:
i don't really understand how the multiswitch functions, so i was hoping someone had a good thread as a reference (searching 'multiswitch' didnt help much).
The coax between the dish and the receiver is a 2-way communication link. The receiver tells the dish which satellite and which transponder polarization to send (based on the channel you want), and the dish sends that specific sub-set of signals back to the receiver.

There are four possible signal combinations from the receiver to the dish, and four sets of signals that can be sent from the dish to the receiver. A multiswitch must be able to provide any/all four of those combinations, therefore a multiswitch must have four connections to the dish so that all four combinations are available at all times. The multiswitch then sends the applicable signal to the receiver.

mishawaka said:
do the existing 4 coax runs plug into the SWM, and then if i wanted to use 2 tuners on the new HR20, just put a two-way splitter between the wall outlet and the HR20, one to each satellite input?
TIA.
From the SWM you only run a single coax to either a receiver or a DVR. The DVR will automatically feed both tuners from the single SWM feed. The SWM feed can be split to feed multiple receivers, but is not split to feed dual tuners in a single DVR.

Carl
 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·


one last bump (i promise) and a sincere thank you to those who have replied.

can someone walk me through this picture? i assume the thing on the left is the power inserter. i assume the 3 ports on the left of the SWM are the legacy ports (two of which would be dedicated to my D11 SD receivers).

what are the 6 ports on the bottom, and what is on the right hand side of the SWM?

i would be feeding an HR20, and an H20, (aside from using 2 legacy ports for the D11s) so how many ports does that leave me for future expansion? now that i have the added capacity, i'd like to maybe add a TV or two to the household, and just wanted to make sure i am doing all the math right.

again, sincere thanks.
 

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-3 ports on the left are the legacy ports
-the 4 uncapped ports on the bottom are for the 4 cables from the dish
-chances are, you will not use the other 2 on the bottom unless you have an international dish or you get your locals via another dish
-the 3 ports on the right hand side: 2 are the swm outputs(you can split them up to 8 tuners). and the other is an ota input
-total capacity of the swm8 is 8 swm tuners and 3 legacy tuners
 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
dave29 said:
-3 ports on the left are the legacy ports
-the 4 uncapped ports on the bottom are for the 4 cables from the dish
-chances are, you will not use the other 2 on the bottom unless you have an international dish or you get your locals via another dish
-the 3 ports on the right hand side: 2 are the swm outputs(you can split them up to 8 tuners). and the other is an ota input
-total capacity of the swm8 is 8 swm tuners and 3 legacy tuners
do i just hook up two of these 4-way splitters to the SWM outputs then? or is there another special splitter i need?

 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
dave29 said:
you only have 2 swm capable receivers right?? you dont need a splitter unless you add more swm capable receivers. then i would use a sws or sts series splitter.
yes, only 2 SWM receivers now, but looking towards the future.

everything answered. thanks again.
 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
got the SWM8 installed today, working perfectly. messed around with diplexing the OTA in, but signals were too low for it to work. ended up adjusting the location of my indoor antenna, and getting 90s on all my locals, so all is well.

sincere thanks to those who replied.
 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ok, one more bump. running a new coax line to the SWM8 to add another H20, and ive got one of these...



right now, the PI is coming off the first SWM output, then an HR20 off that. the second SWM output is running to an H20.

i want to get this 4-way splitter into the picture. i assume i add it after the 15' run of coax off the PI? does it matter which receiver comes off the power pass port? what is the purpose of the power pass port?
 

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Éminence grise
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The power pass port is for when the splitter is between the SWM and the PI. Connect the SWM to the IN port and have the PI somewhere in the line after the Power Pass Out port. If the PI is between the SWM and the splitter, use that port just like any other.
 

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Any unused ports on the splitter (or really anywhere) should have a terminator, like the one for the 2nd SWM output. If you're not familiar with them, here is an example. You might find them at Radio Shack or Home Depot.

If you already know about these, no insult intended.
 

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bakers12 said:
Any unused ports on the splitter (or really anywhere) should have a terminator, like the one for the 2nd SWM output. If you're not familiar with them, here is an example. You might find them at Radio Shack or Home Depot.

If you already know about these, no insult intended.
Just to avoid confusion, terminators should only be used on SWM ports and splitters in the SWM feed. You should never use a terminator on a regular (non-SWM) multiswitch output. You should not use a termnator on the legacy port outputs of an SWM.

Carl
 

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carl6 said:
Just to avoid confusion, terminators should only be used on SWM ports and splitters in the SWM feed. You should never use a terminator on a regular (non-SWM) multiswitch output. You should not use a termnator on the legacy port outputs of an SWM.

Carl
Actually, you should use a terminator on any unused port on any multiswitch that has an OTA input (such as a 3x4), unless its not advised by the manufacturer.
 

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carl6 said:
Just to avoid confusion, terminators should only be used on SWM ports and splitters in the SWM feed. You should never use a terminator on a regular (non-SWM) multiswitch output. You should not use a termnator on the legacy port outputs of an SWM.
Thanks, Carl. That's an important note to add. I was speaking of terminating unused SWM feeds.
 
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