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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I got my AM21N, I just connected a piece of coax cable to it, cut the end off and stripped the cable, and stuck it out the window. I was getting pretty good signal on the 2 main stations I want. Channel 8 was 7-85, and 6 (44) was 79-85, while 13 (38) was getting 61-64 (Don't really need this station, but if I get it, it's an added bonus). I figured I'd up the signal some, and increase stability with an antenna, so I got the Winegard FreeVision FV-HD30 http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=FV-HD30&d=Winegard-FreeVision-FV-HD30-Compact-Ultra-Powerful-DTV-TV-Antenna-Free-Vision-%28FV-HD30-FV-30BB%29-. Just placed it outside, and connected it to the AM21N, and I'm actually getting LOWER signal than the plain coax cable! 8 and 6 (44) were in the low-mid 60's, and 13 (38) was in the low 50's! It was a temp mount, but I wasn't anywhere near the antenna while checking signals. Is coax really that good, or is the antenna just that bad?
 

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Is the antenna pointed correctly?
It will be very directional (ideally, to eliminate multi-path interference), and the simple coax will not. So, the antenna might be pointed in a direction that gives you multi-path.
The numbers don't correlate to signal strength, usually. They are an indication of the "quality" of the received signal, as it relates to multi-path.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
kenglish said:
Is the antenna pointed correctly?
It will be very directional (ideally, to eliminate multi-path interference), and the simple coax will not. So, the antenna might be pointed in a direction that gives you multi-path.
The numbers don't correlate to signal strength, usually. They are an indication of the "quality" of the received signal, as it relates to multi-path.
It's pointing in the direction of the two broadcasting towers.
 

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UHF band has dead spots. Sometimes moving the antenna 6 inches up/down or left/right will dramatically change the signal levels. Without a rotor, you just need to move it around, and change directions in 5 degree increments until you find the results you want.

It is very difficult to explain antenna/wire oddities when you are close to the ground or metal objects which can reflect signals around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Davenlr said:
UHF band has dead spots. Sometimes moving the antenna 6 inches up/down or left/right will dramatically change the signal levels. Without a rotor, you just need to move it around, and change directions in 5 degree increments until you find the results you want.

It is very difficult to explain antenna/wire oddities when you are close to the ground or metal objects which can reflect signals around.
I'll try it. I've got new cabling showing up Tuesday, so I'll try it then. Move it around a bit.
 
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