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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is the connection from the wall to the receiver a special wire or is it just regular coax cable? If it is coax, and I am receiving HD, why can’t the best quality of connection be a simple coax from the receiver to the TV? I know this probably seems like a very basic question that a noobie should already know but I am lost on it. To me, the wire looks like a regular coax to me and I don’t see how you can go from a low quality coax connection to an HDMI connection and expect the HDMI to be higher than the original input signal from the coax.

A little help here would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 

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Cool Member
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Without getting into all the physics of IF and RF signals, as well as composite and/or HDMI, it's a case of comparing apples to oranges.

The incoming signal from the dish to the receiver is carried by coax. Irregardless of the receiver type. HOW that receiver processes the incoming signal and HOW it goes to the television is what defines quality and HD. A good example of that is a SD signal. Ever notice you have a better picture when you use S-Video cables over coax? It comes back to how said receiver processes and downconverts that signal for your television.

Another way of thinking of it is this. The LNB downconverts the incoming satellite signal to one that is useable for the receiver. The receiver in turn downconverts the LNB signal to one that is useable for the television.

I hope that helps
 

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If your television set (or monitor) had an input that accepted RF-Modulated data of HD quality (ATSC (okay, I know that is ATSC is technically digital and not necessarily HD but let's not confuse it more)), and many newer HD sets do have built in ATSC tuners, the Dish receiver COULD send HD quality over a piece of RG-6 coax. However this would require another conversion / de-conversion of the digital stream and would only work on sets with built-in ATSC tuners. Instead they send the digital video and audio stream out the HDMI cable which has multiple connections instead of two - so RF-modulation is not required. This is a also a decidely cheaper approach than building an ATSC RF-Modulator into the reciever.

The signal that is sent to the DBS reciever from the LNBs on the dish is high frequency RF-Modulated data. It contains a LOT of information including overhead and authorization information, etc.

In the end it's not really the cable type that matters, it's how the signal is sent on that piece of cable.
 
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