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Discussion Starter #1
I am upgrading to HD by adding a HR20 to my main TV. I seemed to get a good deal on the install from Directv but during today's install, the deal is starting to change. D* charged me $50 for the new receiver and gave me a $10 credit per month for the first year by agreeing to a 2 year commitment. All sounded fine until the install.

My original dish is a triple LNB mounted on the second story roof about 6 feet from the eve. I requested a 40' ladder and told the CSR that it is a relatively steep pitch roof. They said that it would be no problem.

The installer came out today and told me that he would not be able to install the dish today as he only brought a 26' foot ladder and he would need a harness to get up on the roof. Only one guy in Seattle has a harness and they could do it next weekend. When they can do the install, they would place the dish on the eve as D* will not let them drill into the roof as a liability of possible future water damage.

The installer said that this would no longer be a normal install; now a custom install. I asked him how much that would cost and he said $150 to $300 based on $37.5 per half hour. The original installer did not charge me anything.

I really liked the original install location as it was not visable; not from the street, not from the neighbors, nowhere. My questions are: 1) Does the new slimline dish have a similar mounting plate/mast so that only the dish can be replaced? 2) Should this be considered a custom install since I was very clear in my communication with Directv about the height concerns? 3) Will Directv compensate me for missing the OSU/Mich & USC/Cal games in HD and having to watch them in SD:)? & Should D* pay for the custom install?

I'm not really happy with the situation as I dont have HD today and I have an unknown expense for something that was supposed to be paid in full. If anyone has any answers to my questions or any recommendations, I would love to hear them.
thanks,
mike
 

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Godfather
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The 5lnb dishes do not use the same mounting hardware, they mount on a 2 inch diameter arm instead of the 1.5 inch that the 3lnb dishes use. The big dishes also require additional support arms.

Whatever you told Directv, regardless of what they said, what you're describing would not be considered standard installation. Carrying a 35lb dish up a 40 foot ladder and mounting it securely is a totally different ball game than mounting the 3lnb dish. I've carried them up to the top of 28 footers, and it was most definitely not fun.

Directv may compensate you for the cost of the upgrade however, especially if you call and complain that you were told it would be free. They will not compensate you for missed hd programming.

Also, Directv themselves have no rules regarding penetrating the roof as far as I'm aware. His individual company may have a policy against it which I could understand if they've faced problems in the past due to roof damage, but they can't really pin that on Directv.
 

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Teronzhul said:
The 5lnb dishes do not use the same mounting hardware, they mount on a 2 inch diameter arm instead of the 1.5 inch that the 3lnb dishes use. The big dishes also require additional support arms.
The mounting plate is also larger, so you can't even use the same holes in the roof that the older dish used. You really should consider a side or pole mount as opposed to a roof mount if you have adequate visibility of the satellites. The size and weight of the 5-LNB dish results in greater wind load, thus greater risk of damage during a storm (and it's supposed to get windy again this afternoon here in Seattle).

Carl
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Teronzhul said:
The 5lnb dishes do not use the same mounting hardware, they mount on a 2 inch diameter arm instead of the 1.5 inch that the 3lnb dishes use. The big dishes also require additional support arms.

Whatever you told Directv, regardless of what they said, what you're describing would not be considered standard installation. Carrying a 35lb dish up a 40 foot ladder and mounting it securely is a totally different ball game than mounting the 3lnb dish. I've carried them up to the top of 28 footers, and it was most definitely not fun.

Directv may compensate you for the cost of the upgrade however, especially if you call and complain that you were told it would be free. They will not compensate you for missed hd programming.

Also, Directv themselves have no rules regarding penetrating the roof as far as I'm aware. His individual company may have a policy against it which I could understand if they've faced problems in the past due to roof damage, but they can't really pin that on Directv.
yeah, I wouldnt climb up that high on a ladder let alone carry a dish. As far as the cost, does that sound reasonable on the quote? The Ironwood guy said that it would cost up to $300 just to mount the dish onto the roof which would equate to 4 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
carl6 said:
The mounting plate is also larger, so you can't even use the same holes in the roof that the older dish used. You really should consider a side or pole mount as opposed to a roof mount if you have adequate visibility of the satellites. The size and weight of the 5-LNB dish results in greater wind load, thus greater risk of damage during a storm (and it's supposed to get windy again this afternoon here in Seattle).

Carl
I cant really do a side mount or pole as I do not want to post on the front of the house and I really need height as the neighbor has really tall trees. The installer agrees that this is the correct location for placing the dish, not ideal for the actual install. As far as the wind, we live on top of the plateau in Sammamish so we get a ton of it. I've had no problems with movement on the original dish even though he just screwed into the roof plywood and didnt hit a stud.
Mike
 

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Éminence grise
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When my AT-9 was installed, the Ironwood guy drilled holes into the roof for the lag bolts (however, it is single-story, not steep and easy to reach with a 12 foot ladder). Make sure they install two monopoles (support struts which will keep the wind from moving things).
 

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I had an AT-9 installed on my roof (not quite 40 ft but pretty close)by a private installer. He lagged it into the joists w/ no additional supports. It wasn't cheap, but I have had great reception in a variety of weather conditions since. It can be done.
 

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I have equipment installed, but it was a quick and dirty job done by myself. I need to have it fixed, because I am beginning to loose signal sometimes. Can anyone recommend a local Seattle install company that can do it?

Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I called up D* midweek to talk about the possible $300 install fees and to share that I wasnt really happy with paying any more than I had already agreed to. The CSR told me that my install did not sound like a custom install and it should be covered in the standard install. He said that he would call up Ironwood and then call me back to confirm.

Four days later with no call from Directv, the installer showed up and told me that he typically has to fix the work that my original installer does. In two hours I was up and running with my new HR20 and he did a great job. He installed over a living area and the dish is barely visible from anywhere. It really does depend on which installer you get as they both told me different stories/rules on what they can and cant do.

I'm happy that the first guy backed out!
Mike
 

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Let me pitch in a few things. First off I'll introduct myself. I am an installer in training [ just finished my first OJT week ] for a major HSP in the northeast. From what I know for sure at this point. Some of these might vary from HSP to HSP

- We can drill into a roof on condition that is has asphalt shingles, is slanted and we use silicone [ predrill and fill ]. Those three conditions make sure that no leakage will ocur. We also keep the base on the roof if a customers cancels service to prevent leakage.

- Installers only carry a 28' ladder. If we need a 40' upon the site survey we chirp the supervisor for the 40'. EVERY 40' job is a two man job.

- We don't use harnasses. Carrying a dish on a ladder isn't a joke but with the dish parralell to your back and the arm over your shoulder it works. We can always joist it up with a rope too.

- Job quality depends from tech to tech. If you like a job you can always ask him for his tech# if you want to get future work done by the same guy, also ask for the HSP phone #.
 
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