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Mentor
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45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a recent lightning strike that fried my subwoofer beyond repair I decided to take a look at the rest of my system.

After review I opted to run my two satellite cables through my Monster Power HTS3000. These cables feed the two tuners in my HR-200 DVR. Unfortunately this caused all sorts of problems. I would completely loose a tuner at times, other times certain stations would get the 771 error and several stations had pixelation problems.

After unhooking the cables from the 3000 and going back directly into the HR-200 all seems to be well. I can only assume the 3000 was degrading the satellite signal. Can anyone confirm with similar experiences?

Also, are there any reliable ways to prevent surge through the satellite cables? I hate to run any cables directly to a component.

Thanks!
 

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Dry as a bone
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12,566 Posts
I used to use Monster Power Centers and never had a problem.

I don't use power centers anymore though. I have one of THESE in the home theater, and one of THESE in the living room. Both have HR2X's running through them without issue.
 

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Godfather
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499 Posts
I wouldn't worry about surge entering from the dish cables, D* will replace a leased receiver if it ever gets fried. I would worry about surge from the power lines and protect with surge/ups unit. Probably how your woofer got hit. Just think of all those power lines along the road just waiting for a lightning strike to light them up. Transformers explode, sight to see.
 

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Legend
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155 Posts
I run mine through a surge suppressor and had similar problems. Mine was rated for 2.4 GHz, yet I still had some issues. I put my b-band converters on the dish side of the suppressor and I haven't had any problems since. Don't know if this will help you, but it did the trick for me.
 

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Hall Of Fame
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3,071 Posts
I was told, and still follow the practice of providing a service loop to all electronic equipment. The idea is that power surges, lightning strikes and other voltages will not follow the coiled cable / wire and will abate elsewhere.

Myth Busters?

Joe
 

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Mentor
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39 Posts
Definitely make sure the surge suppressors coax inputs are sat rated (40-2150MHz or better). For SWM usage, they also need to pass 2.3MHz (to be sat rated, they should also already pass DC+22kHz). Normal cable surge suppressors will not work.

Even so, they may cause problems. I have a Panamax and have no problems, but I can't say the same for the RJ-45 passthru on it. It messes up my gigabit network so I could see problems also arising on the coax surge-protected inputs.

For D* leased receivers, they'll replace them for you anyway. But if you run a dedicated OTA line directly to your TV I would still recommend running it through the surge protector to help save your TV.

Naturally, all RG6 coming in from outdoors, SAT and OTA, should first go to a ground block that is tied to your house's electrical ground with at least #10 copper. That's your first stab at stopping problems from lightning and storms. Surge suppressor is more to filter your AC current. Only proper grounding is going to do any help with a lightning strike and even then, almost nothing can prevent damage from a direct strike.
 
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