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· Legend
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I just upgraded my service to HD and have a Vip722 and Vip222. This is my first experience with equipment that requires a phone or network connection always on.

I connected both receivers to my network switch which is connected to my DSL router. I have been getting intermittent messages from the receivers each morning that they require constant network or phone connections (message 588). Sometimes the status is "not connected" other times the status indicates that the receiver is "connected."

I have been resetting the network connection and all seems fine for a day or so. It appears that this could be caused by service interruption on my DSL line.

I called Dish to inquire and their "tech support" had no clue other than when I mentioned DSL they instantly said I require a "filter". I informed them that I have a whole house filter on the incoming phone/DSL line and they continue to insist that I still need an additional filter at the receivers. Is this correct? What type of filter is this? I have 10 PC's connected to my switch with no network issues. I tried to get any information that I could out of the tech but they just stated that it is a simple device and I should just go buy one. I also informed them that I have individual filters which came with my DSL router but were not needed. These filters have RJ11 jacks on them not RJ45 which is what I am using. They just could not seem to understand that I am not using the phone connection but just the ethernet connection. The tech verified all of this with another tech which is why I am confused.

Any advice on this subject would be appreciated. I have run into a dead end as I cannot find any "DSL" filters which are used specifically for ethernet networking.

Thanks,

JD
 

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If you only connect via Broadband then use the ethernet, and go into Menu-6-1-9? and select broadband setup and then select reset DHCP. Your "Router" needs to be setup to allow DHCP. You should be using a Router/Gateway for this application.

If you are saying your receiver will not connect through a phone line, I ask if you have a DSL filter installed on the phone line the receiver is connected to?
 

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Jason Nipp said:
If you only connect via Broadband then use the ethernet, and go into Menu-6-1-9? and select broadband setup and then select reset DHCP. Your "Router" needs to be setup to allow DHCP. You should be using a Router/Gateway for this application.

If you are saying your receiver will not connect through a phone line, I ask if you have a DSL filter installed on the phone line the receiver is connected to?
Thanks for the reply. I am only connected via broadband and the setup is fine (router set for DHCP). I am not connected to a phone line as I have a direct connection from my network switch to the sat boxes (via CAT5E). Tech support could not understand that the line into my house is filtered. I do not need separate filters at each phone jack in the house.

The issue I am having seems to be when my DSL provider temporarily interrupts my service for maint. overnight. I then have to reset both of the receivers using the broadband setup menu.

My question was if anyone else has been charged for not resetting this each time? Will the receiver eventually reset the connection automatically?

Thanks,

JD
 

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I have DSL, and from what I know these filters only affect regular land line phones. Example.. if you don't have any land line phones, you don't need any filters. Just 1 filter to connect the ethernet line to the DSL modem from a regular phone line . You have 4 color wires in a phone line, and the phone only uses 2 of them. The DSL uses the other 2 colors. The filters only let the phone see the 2 wires it needs. These filters should not affect the DSL connection at all. The other connections off the router are ok and you don't have any problems, sounds like a loose ethernet connection or you have a receiver problem.
 

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otnipj3s said:
I have DSL, and from what I know these filters only affect regular land line phones. Example.. if you don't have any land line phones, you don't need any filters. Just 1 filter to connect the ethernet line to the DSL modem from a regular phone line . You have 4 color wires in a phone line, and the phone only uses 2 of them. The DSL uses the other 2 colors. The filters only let the phone see the 2 wires it needs. These filters should not affect the DSL connection at all. The other connections off the router are ok and you don't have any problems, sounds like a loose ethernet connection or you have a receiver problem.
otnipj3s - That's not how DSL works where I come from ( and I used to work for the local phone company as well as still being a current customer of theirs USING DSL CONTINUOUSLY since July 2000.

DSL can indeed be on the same pair of copper that your voice service is on - the frequency ranges allow this sharing of the copper. This is why you either have a splitter in your NID that splits voice /data OR you have to ensure that each "phone" device has a DSL filter on it. These phone devices also include FAX machines and COMPUTER MODEMS (also read - DBS receivers). If you have dialtone and DSL on the same pair of copper - you are required to use the DSL filters for optimum performance.

If your DBS receiver is using ethernet through your router - it has nothing to do with this.
 

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otnipj3s said:
I have DSL, and from what I know these filters only affect regular land line phones. Example.. if you don't have any land line phones, you don't need any filters.
Depends on what you mean by that. Sure, if you use your lines for DSL only and never, ever have anything that would actually pick up and use the phone line like a telephone would then, yes, you are correct -- you don't need any filters. But that seems rare (although, I could see people getting just DSL that use their cell phones as their normal lines, I guess).

Just 1 filter to connect the ethernet line to the DSL modem from a regular phone line.
What? What does a filter have to do with the ethernet connection? I think you are confused -- or not explaining what you mean here. If you have NO phones (or other devices using your phone lines like a phone), then you would run the phone line straight into your DSL modem -- and your ethernet line into the DSL modem's ethernet out port -- and use no filters at all.

You have 4 color wires in a phone line, and the phone only uses 2 of them. The DSL uses the other 2 colors.
Sorry, but this is completely incorrect. Sometimes, yes, you do have 4 wires in a phone line. And, yes, the phone only uses two of them (red and green). But the DSL piggybacks on those same two. The yellow and black are simply not used. You could run just the red and green to a phone or your DSL modem and both would still work fine (and you'd still need a filter on the ones going to the phone). The other 2 are not used at all. The main 2 are used for both voice and DSL traffic -- at the same time.

The filters only let the phone see the 2 wires it needs.
Nope. The filters are frequency filters only, as scooper also said. Scooper is correct about how this works -- you are incorrect, sorry. The filters operate on the same two wires that both the voice lines and DSL use -- they simply filter the frequency to prevent interference between the two because, as I said, the same pair of wires is used to transport voice and DSL data at the same time.

- John...
 

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scooper said:
otnipj3s - That's not how DSL works where I come from ( and I used to work for the local phone company as well as still being a current customer of theirs USING DSL CONTINUOUSLY since July 2000.

DSL can indeed be on the same pair of copper that your voice service is on - the frequency ranges allow this sharing of the copper. This is why you either have a splitter in your NID that splits voice /data OR you have to ensure that each "phone" device has a DSL filter on it. These phone devices also include FAX machines and COMPUTER MODEMS (also read - DBS receivers). If you have dialtone and DSL on the same pair of copper - you are required to use the DSL filters for optimum performance.

If your DBS receiver is using ethernet through your router - it has nothing to do with this.
My point ( even thought I didn't have it right how DSL worked ) is that filters should not affect an already working ethernet connection.
 

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Indeed -- filters have nothing to do with this whole thing.

The real problem is that, when his internet connection goes down, his receivers don't seem to recover well when it comes back up. That's the issue, correct? And he's concerned that, if they don't talk for a while, he might be billed for not having them connected.

It does seem odd that the receivers would even be effected by your internet going down though. I assume this all goes through a firewall/router, right? If so, then they would never lose their connection to the ROUTER -- even if your internet connect did go down. They'd just temporarily be unable to communicate with the Net. Are you saying that they don't even recover from that? Maybe their retry interval is exponential and, by the time you notice, they are just on a long retry timeout that might eventually work? Or do they really never recover?

Maybe if you tried some different DHCP lease times from your router? Forcing them to renew more often might help them with whatever the retry issue is. (Note that there is no technical reason that that should work -- it would just be a matter of trying to use it as a workaround for the receiver(s) not retrying after they can't connect for a while -- maybe them having to renew their DHCP lease would cause them to then try again and have it work.)

- John...
 

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[

What? What does a filter have to do with the ethernet connection? I think you are confused -- or not explaining what you mean here. If you have NO phones (or other devices using your phone lines like a phone), then you would run the phone line straight into your DSL modem -- and your ethernet line into the DSL modem's ethernet out port -- and use no filters at all.

The question that jdskycaster asked is about a filter and an ethernet connection. I agree, the filter should not matter. I may be confused about a few things, but what I do know is that the ATT has a filter used connecting the phone line to the modem. The filter has 2 outputs......to DSL modem, and phone. You do not connect the phone line directly into the modem as per ATT instrucitons. Sorry about my lack of knowledge.

http://store.att.com/catalog/productdetails.asp?ProductId=Z-330TJA&CategoryId=catNA#
 

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As several folks have noted, the problem lies between the receivers and the network router. Something is causing the receivers to lose their connection to the router. It could be that the router is crashing and rebooting at night for some reason. Most routers allow you to set up a PC and store a log from the router. That's what I'd do. It's likely that the log would give you some idea of what is happening when the receivers lose their connection.
 
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