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You could try reformatting the whole thing but a 1TB SSD is only $60 on Amazon. So anything smaller is cheaper. This way you won't have to worry about it further and waste more of your time. How much is it worth?
 

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Beware the Attack Basset
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a 1TB SSD is only $60 on Amazon. So anything smaller is cheaper.
When you can get a new name brand 4TB HDD for $75, why would you spend $60 for a much smaller no-name SSD (name brand 1TB SSDs start at $85). Don't leave out the cost of a 3.5" to 2.5" adapter that the SSD will require. SSDs have a few significant advantages but they certainly aren't a no-brainer.

Either way you get a new drive that should last at least as long as the 7-12 year old DVR.
 

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Beware the Attack Basset
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I always thought the drive is married to the receiver. I guess I am incorrect? Thanks.
The drive is indeed "married" to the receiver. Moving the HDD or the SSD to another DVR will require a re-format to make full use of the drive. I think the idea was that the new drive wouldn't be useless should the DVR fail.
 

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Mentor
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You could try reformatting the whole thing but a 1TB SSD is only $60 on Amazon. So anything smaller is cheaper. This way you won't have to worry about it further and waste more of your time. How much is it worth?
You should only be using SSDs if you plan to keep them powered on, or, at least, powered on regularly. If you are saving content to SSDs, but only watching it sporadically (and hence, keep it powered off when not in use), then you risk the SSD losing data, and (depending on where that loss occurs), becoming unreadable. Obviously, that "problem" is not an issue for magnetic hard drives. You don't want to ever use SSDs for things like backups, e.g. something that you backup, and put in a safe place, expecting that you can come back months later and retrieve that data.

You can google your way to a variety of sources that discuss the issue, but here's a discussion on an IBM site: Potential for SSD data loss after extended shutdown

All, FWIW.
 

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I replaced the hard drive a year ago with a bigger storage hard drive and everything worked great. Now a year later, the recordings aren’t working but watching live tv works great. What could be causing the recordings not to work even though live tv works with no problem? Could it be the fan? The bigger hard drive is causing the recording to not work? Any help will be appreciated.
Firstly, what size hard drive are you using?
Paul
 

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Just going through recordings and some of the recordings are stuttering and are damaged and some work with no problem at all. I recorded 3 new recordings now and they all work with no stuttering or problems.
If you have an HDD that is shot, putting another HDD in the DVR will work well for a year or two, and then you'll be in the same situation. If you put an SSD in the unit, you'll have fewer problems, and your DVR will be faster than it ever was. If you want to put these problems to bed, you might consider switching to Directv Stream. It's less expensive, and it's a lot better than the satellite service. The cloud DVR function is much easier to use than the HRs,' and the remotes are a lot more responsive.

If can't bear the loss of your physical DVRs, put SSDs in them. I ran them in all of my DVRs for over three years, didn't lose a drive and the picture was as stable as watching Netflix on an ATV. Don't worry about problems with SSDs written here by folks who haven't used them in the HRs.
 
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