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Legend
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been trying to peak my dishes before winter to minimize rain/snow fade and am finding that my local spotbeam for central Indiana Tr18s13 if I understand the maps correctly is very weak. It peaks out at 75 on my 622 and about 5 points higher on the 508. The conus beams from E8 at 110 (Trs 2 and 22 for example) are well over 100 on both receivers. This was done today which is a beautiful clear one in central Indiana. Is this normal? I figured the local spotbeam should peg the meter. Anyone else in Indiana see this, or am I missing something. This is the first time I have really payed much attention to signal strength since I installed my 61.5 dish well before E10 went into service. Any suggestions are welcome.
 

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Super Moderator
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Spots don't always peg the receiver, but if you are in them they should have high signal levels.
I'm near the Michigan line (relative to you) and am getting 95 on 18s13.
You should actually be doing better than me - or at least the same.
We might be seeing (accepted) interference off of the Wisconsin spot - but you would get less of that than me.
 

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Legend
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137 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks James. I thought it should be doing better than that. I'll check it again later and try tweaking it more. Would moving the skew around do any good? I have been peaking azimuth first then elevation and leaving skew at the recommended setting.
 

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The rules for peaking a dish say "don't touch the skew to peak the dish" but I have to admit that I have broken that rule. If the mast isn't perfectly plum I can see where a slight skew adjustment would help.
 

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Godfather
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484 Posts
I suggest peaking on ConUS transponders exclusively and ignoring the spot readings.

In most locations, E10 spot signals are interference limited, which means that unlike with ConUS readings, the receiver's signal readings for the spot beam are NOT an accurate reflection of actual signal strength. Rain fade margins on local (read: if you have not "moved") spot beams tend to be much greater than the signal numbers would indicate. A "75" spot signal could easily be stronger than a "110" ConUS signal. It's also possible that a properly peaked dish (i.e. so as to have the highest rain fade margin) may yield a lower signal number on your local spot beam than a misaligned dish.

To repeat, use ConUS transponder readings for dish peaking.
 
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