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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few games on my HD DVR that I want to keep but it's taking up allot of room on my DVR and was wondering if it's possible to bring this content over to my PC? For example can you maybe hook up an external hard drive and some how save it to that device for later use?
 

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The Shadow Knows!
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I'm sorry, that doesn't really work. If you get a video capture device for your PC that accepts HD inputs, you can do it that way.
 

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mastrauckas said:
How good does the HD PVR work?
Honestly I don't know. Just remember reading about it somewhere and had bookmarked the page at some point.
 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
jodyguercio said:
Honestly I don't know. Just remember reading about it somewhere and had bookmarked the page at some point.
It appears you can buy it at Best Buy so I may give it a try?

Other note I think someone needs to inform them that Circuit City went out of business? Either that or they haven't updated that page for that past few years.
 

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The Shadow Knows!
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Actually circuitcity.com still operates under the same umbrella as tigerdirect.com, compusa.com and other zombie brands. They just have no brick-and-mortar stores, but you can't hold that against them :)
 

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mastrauckas said:
It appears you can buy it at Best Buy so I may give it a try?

Other note I think someone needs to inform them that Circuit City went out of business? Either that or they haven't updated that page for that past few years.
Give it a try and then come back and tell us all how it went.
 

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veryoldschool said:
:confused: I have no idea how a "game" is going to get transferred. A recording is simply played and captured, but isn't a game interactive? If so, then all that would be captured is the output of the game being played. :confused:
I think he is referring to a sporting event there VOS, not a game of Pong......:lol:.
 

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Cool Member
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I have the HD PVR and use it to archive videos and sporting events. The HD DVR connects to the HD PVR by way of the component output of the HD DVR. You will run a digital audio output from the HD DVR to allow you to keep your recordings in 5.1 DD. The HD PVR connects to your computer through a USB cable and you will run the supplied capture software on the connected computer. The unit captures the video in real time so it will take as long as the playback of the video to capture. The video quality is variable to allow for different quality videos and different sizes of files to archive.

I find the quality to be excellent and have been extremely happy with this purchase. The file format used is the MPEG-2 TS format (this may be adjustable by the software). To keep in the same quality as recorded on the HD DVR it is about 4 GB per hour at this format.
 

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AllStar
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Another option is a vucano: http://www.myvulkano.com/

A vulcano is similar to a sling box except both the pc and iPad players give you the option of recording whatever you playback. The recordings are saved in mp4. I have the vulcano flow and I've used it to transform several dvr recordings to my pc, including all of last year's Green Bay Packer playoff run.
 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
vipersl said:
I have the HD PVR and use it to archive videos and sporting events. The HD DVR connects to the HD PVR by way of the component output of the HD DVR. You will run a digital audio output from the HD DVR to allow you to keep your recordings in 5.1 DD. The HD PVR connects to your computer through a USB cable and you will run the supplied capture software on the connected computer. The unit captures the video in real time so it will take as long as the playback of the video to capture. The video quality is variable to allow for different quality videos and different sizes of files to archive.

I find the quality to be excellent and have been extremely happy with this purchase. The file format used is the MPEG-2 TS format (this may be adjustable by the software). To keep in the same quality as recorded on the HD DVR it is about 4 GB per hour at this format.
Thanks for the information. Other than buying the device and wires do you need to buy anything else?

vipersl said:
You will run a digital audio output from the HD DVR to allow you to keep your recordings in 5.1 DD.
Also I'm not exactly sure how you go the surround sound part working? Because it's using component wires and HD PVR doesn't have any digital inputs, how are you capturing the digital audio with the video together?
 

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Cool Member
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The device comes with all the wiring you need except for an optical cable. This is the connection on the back of the HD PVR that allows for digital audio.
 

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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
ssandhoops said:
Another option is a vucano: http://www.myvulkano.com/

A vulcano is similar to a sling box except both the pc and iPad players give you the option of recording whatever you playback. The recordings are saved in mp4. I have the vulcano flow and I've used it to transform several dvr recordings to my pc, including all of last year's Green Bay Packer playoff run.
vulcano flow support digital audio? It doesn't look like it by the back of the device but it does include 1 HDMI cable, which it wouldn't give you it didn't support HDMI at all?
 

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AllStar
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vipersl said:
I have the HD PVR and use it to archive videos and sporting events. The HD DVR connects to the HD PVR by way of the component output of the HD DVR. You will run a digital audio output from the HD DVR to allow you to keep your recordings in 5.1 DD. The HD PVR connects to your computer through a USB cable and you will run the supplied capture software on the connected computer. The unit captures the video in real time so it will take as long as the playback of the video to capture. The video quality is variable to allow for different quality videos and different sizes of files to archive.

I find the quality to be excellent and have been extremely happy with this purchase. The file format used is the MPEG-2 TS format (this may be adjustable by the software). To keep in the same quality as recorded on the HD DVR it is about 4 GB per hour at this format.
I also have the HD PVR and I concur with these comments -- my experience has been very good -- good quality HD video and only a few glitches. You can't beat this unit for easy of use and cost. Comparable equipment to record HD video costs a LOT more.

One thing to note -- it's not easy to edit the videos so if you are recording football games, etc. that have commercials, you may find it easier to just watch or FF thru the ads.
 

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Hall Of Fame
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mastrauckas said:
vulcano flow support digital audio? It doesn't look like it by the back of the device but it does include 1 HDMI cable, which it wouldn't give you it didn't support HDMI at all?
The HDMI cable is for output (from the Flow to a monitor/Tv) not for input from a source. Audio in on all Vulkanos is analog only.
 

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Mentor
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CincySaint said:
I also have the HD PVR and I concur with these comments -- my experience has been very good -- good quality HD video and only a few glitches. You can't beat this unit for easy of use and cost. Comparable equipment to record HD video costs a LOT more.

One thing to note -- it's not easy to edit the videos so if you are recording football games, etc. that have commercials, you may find it easier to just watch or FF thru the ads.
Since you are going to be saving the videos to a hard drive, Videoredo h.264 is a great editor with a tweakable commercial detector. It is a time saver and well worth the $100 it will cost to buy it in my opinion.
 
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