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Mine is. I have one 8 foot grounding rod below the pole and another 30 feet away. Both are bonded with a #6 solid copper conductor. The main one is grounded to the service panel with a #4 copper conductor.

As a Master Electrician, I want to be really sure of my grounding system.

Attached is a photo.....................
 

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What kind of plumbing do you have?

If you have copper or steel, you are in luck. You can use the plumbing as part of the bonding system for another 8 ft. rod driven at the pole.

You just have to make sure that you have the necessary bonding jumpers at water heaters, filters or dielectric unions.
 

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Not NEC conforming, but you can bond to the bare ground of an air conditioner, clothes dryer or a range.
 

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kay said:
2. I can put a grounding stake within 20 feet of the dish and then run 6awg copper solid wire to the main electrical ground. That would be rather costly I still don't think up to code, the impression I get is that I would have to add a full 8 foot grounding rod every 20 feet which means several unsightly cords all over the place.
This would be in compliance with the NEC, however, you'd only need to place one rod at the dish and run the #6 wire back to the main ground, NOT a grounding rod every 20 feet. The bonding conductor cannot be in contact with combustible material.
 

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They make a water boring nozzle (cheap) that attaches to the end of a pvc pipe with another attachment to a garden hose. This allows you to place a grey pvc conduit under a driveway quite easily.
 

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As a Master Electrician, I believe that what you said would the best option.

Grounding is cheap. A lot of it is done wrong. I can attest to that. Just make sure that you use the correct copper split bolts and direct burial grounding bronze connectors. On jobs, I generally use one on each cable. On my own, I use two. Also, use a 5/8" copper coated UL listed rod. The one that you currently have appears to be galvanized. Using two grounding rods bonded by #6 copper and placed more than 8 feet apart makes your system comply with all of the latest NEC rules, as well with all other codes.

You cannot overdo safety.
 

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kay said:
Only other question, does #6 copper bonding mean 6AWG copper wire? That's the impression I got...
Yes, that's exactly what it means.

kay said:
I've decided on this method then. I don't care if I have to put down a good couple hundred bucks on a spool of cable, pvc, connectors, etc, if it's done right. Even if I stop using satellite service i'll likely still likely do a FTA setup so I want it done well permanently. So just to recap:

Dish -> Grounding Block -> 10AWG (or better) to grounding rod -> to a "direct burial grounding bronze connector?" -> to PVC pipe -> back out of the ground to the grounding rod by the electrical main.

I did more research on routing out a hole under the driveway, and it's no big deal at all - seems like a lot of work but with the right tools it will be no problem. I suppose in the end both of my neigbors on each side are electricians, I don't know them well but this might be time to go say hi and see if they wouldn't mind giving me a once over to see if i've got it right :p
The most important thing is that you have upgraded the grounding system for your home.

The current NEC specifies that one grounding rod is necessary, if the grounding resistance is 25 ohms or less. If not, a second rod spaced at least 8 feet apart pr more must be installed and bonded to the first with a #6 or better copper conductor. With the second bonded rod installed, the system automatically meets the NEC. Almost all electricians dispense with measuring grounding resistance and just install the second grounding rod bonded to the first. This is because the ground resistance meter, itself, cost nearly $2,000 to $3,000.
 

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harsh said:
Structural steel is a relatively poor conductor (especially if it is immersed in concrete; an excellent insulator).
A #10 copper conductor wrapped under a nut on one of the mounting bolts at the base of the dish to the UL listed direct burial connector is the way to go.

harsh said:
Each device must have its own ground wire that runs all the way to the bonding point.
A copper split bolt can be used to bond any grounding wire at any point along a grounding conduictor asnd still comply with the code. Code only requires that the main grounding wire from the main panel to the first grounding rod be in one continuous piece or be of pieces joined with a nonreversible means, such as crimping. #4 or #6 crimpers are very expensive. I know, since I have three sets of Thomas and Betts TBM5's, 6's and 8's. They sell for at least $1,000 a set NEW. That's why most electricians just run a continuous wire.
 

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kay said:
I'm still trying to find specifics on what type of conduit and wire to use, but the conduit seems to be the electrical (dark grey stuff) that is rather expensive, and the wire as far as I can tell can be bare of sleeved, although I prefer the idea of sleeved. The burial depth tends to vary from what i've found via a few quick google searches, most seem to like 18 inches, which may be a bit difficult but certainly do-able.
Grounding wire is different from power cable. There is no need for conduit, especially #6 when buried. You can use 1/2" PVC to run the cable under the concrete driveway, get the wire under and across, and leave it or pull it out, if you want. It doesn't matter. Burial depth of 6 inches is just fine. It's a ground wire. Earth contact enhances the ground.

And I suppose that's a great thing! The electrical system in my home is probably less than adequate as it is! I mean it passed inspection and everything said:
It passed inspection, because it was "grandfathered" to the date it was built. A structure built in 1920 with knob and tube wiring passes inspection and is allowed by the power company and is compliance with law, but would be totally inadequate by today's standards.
 

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gigahz said:
Saw someone say connect to "house ground".......DON'T DO IT.

Simple.

Shortest path possible to an 8' ground rod hammered in Mother Earth.
What code or regulatory authority is the basis of your comment?
 

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kay said:
I've not seen anything that says you are right, every decent source of info says this is a bad thing and can introduce feedback problems into the electrical system via a ground loop. Can you give me any info as to why you would say this?

As of right now the plan is to drive an 8 foot grounding rod right into the dirt about 12 inches from the dish, and run a #6 copper wire from there all the way around the house to the main grounding rod for the house. Everything i've found says this is a good idea. Granted i'm not going to jump on this until tuesday, so i'm still looking for second and third opinions and such for the time being, but everything Mike500 has told me so far i've been able to find credible backup sources for :) I do worry about a 6 inch burial though, isn't there a huge chance someone digging even a single scoop with a shovel will cut the wire? I would imagine that the minimum requirement be much deeper?
A #6 wire is a large conductor. The current NEC requires at least #6 to equalized the potential between two ground rods. For a 200 amp service panel, the panel ground conductor can be #8 or larger. But a #8 conductor, pursuant to the code, would required that it be enclosed in a conduit running from the meter or panel to the grounding rod. An electrician usually installs a #6 or #4, since it is durable enough, so that it is not requred to be in a conduit.

Hand digging with a shovel will not readily sever a #6 conductor. A backhoe or a trencher would. If you'd like, bury the wire close to walls or places where a backhoe or a trencher will not be likely used. It wouldn't hurt to bury it deeper, but, you might place some ACQ treated 1x3 boards above it to protect the wire.

Another way is to place a RED vinyl tape a couple of inches above the buried wire. RED is the International indicator of a house current service cable that is buried underneath. You can get this tape at an electrical supply house that sells electrical supplies.
 

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You must verify that the copper piping is a complete conductor path and grounded to the main electrical panel. Water heaters, appliances such as filters and water softeners or any sections of plastic pipe must have #6 or better jumpers to complete continuity. The panel, itself, must be grounded to an 8 foot buried grounding rod. Since NEC 1996, just grounding to a water pipe is not sufficient.

Additionally, you'd be surprised on how many plumbing systems do not have the required 20 feet of buried pipe for a decent ground. Most outside water lines are plastic; pvc or polyethylene.

A lot of PEX. CPVC, or older polybutylene plumbing systems are installed in walls, in attics or under floors, with only the visible stubs and other sections being copper. This is happening more than ever, since copper has tripled or more in cost over the past three years.

Homeowners are led to believe that they have copper plumbing systems, when, in fact, they don't.
 

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D-Bamatech said:
.. Mike500 ?... are you Holt? > that above sounds EXACTLY like a quote or paste from Mike Holt or either Todd of Dbs install... hmmm
Nope............It's just the technical language that is similar. I'm a Master Electrician and have written and interpreted a lot of codes for government regulatory agencies.

I am retired and was once a senior legal analyst and technical writer for a Federal regulatory agency involved in code enforcement.
 

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Yeah,

I did a lot of incident investigations involving failure of engineered components. Incredibly, a lot of these designs and executions do not directly result in catastrophic failure. It is usualy at least two or more contributory events occuring in a particular sequence or over a period of time.

You wouldn't believe how much substandard noncomplying engineering or execution there is out there. It's amazing how few of them really result in disaster.

Too many people cut corners with safety. They don't care how safe it is or how durable it it. All they care is that it works. Warranties DO NOT protect the consumer. They are a statement LIMITING the LIABILITY of the manufacturer and the merchant or the contractor.
 
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