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· Cool Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the whole house DVR set up and activated and it is working between the two DVRs but not the regular receiver that it did work with.

The HR24 won't however connect to the network. I used to be able to see it from my iPad but no longer.

I have tried connecting to no avail. I have reset the router, tried to give it a static IP address in the same subnet, changed the port on the router. Nothing.

It just keeps the fake 169 address and errors out every time.

Everything else is working on the network.

It is connected to the network via the Whole house kit.

I have also tried unplugging the DVR and the whole house black box and letting them sit but I still get nothing.
 

· Hall Of Fame
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Can you give a more detailed description of your setup? That model receivers and DVRs do you have? How are they networked to each other? Did you add/remove/replace something in your setup and then you had the issue or did it pop up spontaneously?
 

· Cool Member
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did not add or replace anything.

There is also and HR22 and and another HD revicever that was working. The HR24 is the main connection to the network through the black whole house network, All units are connected by coax, only the little black Whole house unit that direct TV provided is connected to Cat-5.
 

· Premium Member
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rjgogo said:
I did not add or replace anything.

There is also and HR22 and and another HD revicever that was working. The HR24 is the main connection to the network through the black whole house network, All units are connected by coax, only the little black Whole house unit that direct TV provided is connected to Cat-5.
It sounds like maybe the DECA has been disabled in the 24.
Do the other receivers have an IP from the router?
Does the 24 say "coax connected" under the system info screen for networking?
If the DECA did get disabled, you might try re-running the SAT setup and reboot as this will enable the DECA again.
 

· Mentor
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48 Posts
I had pretty much the same problem on a H24 tonight. Went through the same steps to resolve with a CSR on the phone. The CSR finally had me RBR *ALL* my receivers and then everything started working again.
 

· Cool Member
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I got it working. After exhausting every other avenue I swapped in my old router and low and behold the receivers came back on the network. It seems that for some reason the computers were getting IP addresses but not the direct TV stuff and that is wired. Strange.
 

· Mentor
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"rjgogo" said:
It seems that for some reason the computers were getting IP addresses but not the direct TV stuff and that is wired. Strange.
That is what happened to me as well and had the CSR stumped. The third CSR it was escalated to finally had me do the RBR on all four of my receivers simultaneously (so they were all in a reboot state at the same time and none were appearing on the network) and that did the trick.
 

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"rjgogo" said:
I got it working. After exhausting every other avenue I swapped in my old router and low and behold the receivers came back on the network. It seems that for some reason the computers were getting IP addresses but not the direct TV stuff and that is wired. Strange.
It seems that every now and then there can be a hiccup with DECA. If you notice all your receivers are not getting assigned an IP address and are getting APIPA (169.254.x.x), it can usually be resolved with a reboot of the router and then a reset of the network settings on the receivers so they re-obtain an IP address.

- Merg
 

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The Merg said:
It seems that every now and then there can be a hiccup with DECA. If you notice all your receivers are not getting assigned an IP address and are getting APIPA (169.254.x.x), it can usually be resolved with a reboot of the router and then a reset of the network settings on the receivers so they re-obtain an IP address.

- Merg
As someone who's had DECA longer than most, I've never had a "hiccup with DECA" that a receiver reboot didn't resolve.

Long before DECA came out, I have had "router hiccups" that have been so bad that I've needed to do a factory reset to it.
 

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veryoldschool said:
As someone who's had DECA longer than most, I've never had a "hiccup with DECA" that a receiver reboot didn't resolve.

Long before DECA came out, I have had "router hiccups" that have been so bad that I've needed to do a factory reset to it.
I'll have to look, but I've seen quite a few posts here where the resolution was just rebooting the router. Maybe it was in conjunction of resetting the receivers so it was coincidence though... :D

- Merg
 

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veryoldschool said:
routers can block ports which may stop MRV, but it isn't the DECAs.
Gotcha. Wasn't trying to imply that the DECA was stopping MRV at all. I was simply referring to when a user has been getting APIPA on their receivers causing Internet access to stop working, although MRV would still work at that point. My guess is that the router for some reason just isn't seeing the receivers (and it has to go through the CCK to see them) so they don't get assigned an IP address. When the router is rebooted, it assigns the IP address correctly, although, like I said above, it could just be coincidence and a reboot of the receivers is what is actually allowing the receiver to get an IP address. It just seems strange to me that all receivers would suddenly get APIPA if it was a receiver issue, hence, my thought that it is a router issue.

- Merg
 

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"The Merg" said:
Gotcha. Wasn't trying to imply that the DECA was stopping MRV at all. I was simply referring to when a user has been getting APIPA on their receivers causing Internet access to stop working, although MRV would still work at that point. My guess is that the router for some reason just isn't seeing the receivers (and it has to go through the CCK to see them) so they don't get assigned an IP address. When the router is rebooted, it assigns the IP address correctly, although, like I said above, it could just be coincidence and a reboot of the receivers is what is actually allowing the receiver to get an IP address. It just seems strange to me that all receivers would suddenly get APIPA if it was a receiver issue, hence, my thought that it is a router issue.

- Merg
A lot of consumer grade routers do a terrible job with DHCP. The Netgear router I am currently using dumps the entire lease table on a reboot/power cycle and does not check for conflicts before allocating IP addresses. For always on devices such as DVRs this inevitably causes conflicts. I am fairly certain in my case that is why the RBR on all receivers fixed the problem - it forced them to all acquire a new IP address and everything was able to communicate once again. If receivers have IP address conflicts they will not work correctly on the network and thus MRV and other functions that require a stable network won't work as expected.
 
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