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I have the HDDs and can mount it under Ubuntu and read any file

that's real world experience vs your typing here !

FYI: rt partition hold big files like video/audio PES/ES
Isn't it possible to retain recordings on a different DVR (same model) by using the same card? Or was it transferring the RID chip? Just in case my HR24-100 ever gives up...
 

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Go Pack Go!!!!
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Isn't it possible to retain recordings on a different DVR (same model) by using the same card? Or was it transferring the RID chip? Just in case my HR24-100 ever gives up...
It’s the RID chip for programs not recorded on OTA channels. The recordings will always be retained no matter what DVR it’s connected to, and one will not get the ‘Searching for authorized content’ nag for recorded OTA channels if moving the drive to a different DVR. New cards can get married to existing DVR’s all the time if they go bad, but the non-OTA recorded program needs to see the RID it was originally recorded from to play.
 

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It’s the RID chip for programs not recorded on OTA channels. The recordings will always be retained no matter what DVR it’s connected to, and one will not get the ‘Searching for authorized content’ nag for recorded OTA channels if moving the drive to a different DVR. New cards can get married to existing DVR’s all the time if they go bad, but the non-OTA recorded program needs to see the RID it was originally recorded from to play.
Thanks for that, certainty helps me know the basis of the recording limitations. Also, do you by any chance know where this RID chip is located on the HR24-100? I am familiar with micro soldering, fix iPhones and iPads a ton and you know how those things sometimes need to be fixed.
 

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Thanks for that, certainty helps me know the basis of the recording limitations. Also, do you by any chance know where this RID chip is located on the HR24-100? I am familiar with micro soldering, fix iPhones and iPads a ton and you know how those things sometimes need to be fixed.
I did probably 10 years ago, but it’s better to steer your focus on replacement fans and a backup power supply for that HR24. I have 14 of them- many of them since 2010 when they were first manufactured and I’ve never had a motherboard failure yet, nor a power supply failure. It’s just been fans and HDD’s that went bad over time.

The 24-100’s had two different fan models depending on manufacture date. If the fan in yours has the two 45° edges on it, those were the more problematic ones and are not as easy to find and purchase replacements. I’ve purchased new ones in the past from Ali-Express.
 

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I would assume an ssd's life would be severely shorten from the constant writing of the data streams, the buffer runs 24/7 365.

The cells in an ssd can only be written to a set number of times before failure. There's extra reserved in the ssd just for failures but that's limited too.

I've just never seen it mentioned.
 

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I would assume an ssd's life would be severely shorten from the constant writing of the data streams, the buffer runs 24/7 365.

The cells in an ssd can only be written to a set number of times before failure. There's extra reserved in the ssd just for failures but that's limited too.

I've just never seen it mentioned.
I ran all my HRs with SSDs for over 3 years without a problem. Didn't lose one. If you think an SSD will be harmed by using it in a DVR...well, you can certainly say that about an HDD. And, you won't have the problems with an SSD that you have with HDDs.
There's an even better solution to the drive problems the DVRs have and always will have, try the Directv Stream app. It's worth looking at, the DVR function is much better than using a physical DVR.
 

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Beware the Attack Basset
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If you think an SSD will be harmed by using it in a DVR...well, you can certainly say that about an HDD.
When did you usually need to start replacing HDDs in your DIRECTV DVRs? Was it not much longer than three years? Repeated writes to an HDD don't cause "damage". Repeated writes to a cell on an SSD are most definitely numbered.

I think you're confusing slowing user interface with "damage" and that's not what is going on at all.
 

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I would assume an ssd's life would be severely shorten from the constant writing of the data streams, the buffer runs 24/7 365.

The cells in an ssd can only be written to a set number of times before failure. There's extra reserved in the ssd just for failures but that's limited too.

I've just never seen it mentioned.
Cell wear has been mentioned here often.

The newer DVRs are not writing video 24/7.

Writing video, which has long data blocks, is much easier on a SSD than a computer type application with short blocks. The wear and tear is when you delete a video and then record overwrite, but SSD controllers have wear leveling algorithms that won't hit a cell very often. There is over-provisioning and you do have the choice of buying a larger SSD that will last longer. But some of these SSD have extremely large write cycles that if you do the math, its maybe 10 years before wear would be noticed.

All controllers are not created equal, however. And many consumer products cut corners. So pick one that has favorable reports here.

Rotational drives do wear out but with different pathologies. They have a tendency to loose video data before going belly up, which is often observed as slow response, stuttering, corrupted recordings. Drive controllers have magic sauce that is tuned to a particular application or spec target.

I evaluated HDs and SSD for demanding video applications for years. There is quite a difference between marketing literature, schools of thought, rules of thumb and the real video world, a side effect is this behavior. The DTV DVR application is far from a demanding one.
 

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Beware the Attack Basset
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The wear and tear is when you delete a video and then record overwrite, but SSD controllers have wear leveling algorithms that won't hit a cell very often.
You seem to overlook the idea that a small SSD is more likely to see higher sector reuse than a large drive simply because it will likely have less free space on it (unless you spend considerable amount of time pruning your recordings).
There is over-provisioning and you do have the choice of buying a larger SSD that will last longer. But some of these SSD have extremely large write cycles that if you do the math, its maybe 10 years before wear would be noticed.
Over-provisioning is usually pretty light on cheap drives (the type that is most commonly used here for value comparisons) and to get the optimal provisioning setup often requires optional features that a DVR cannot offer control over. These SSDs with lots of cell cycles or over-provisioning are typically that much more expensive than the drives I've seen mentioned here. A 4TB WD Blue SSD (nothing to write home about) costs around four times that of a similarly sized WD Purple or Seagate Skyhawk surveillance drive (designed specifically for DVR use). The same is true for the Crucial MX SSDs.

My fundamental argument remains: HDDs typically last at least twice as long as most people have been running SSDs so it isn't proven that an SSD will obviously outlast an HDD. SSDs tend to be quite a bit more sensitive to heat than HDDs and that's especially troubling in devices that are often placed in situations of difficult cooling.
 

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You seem to overlook the idea that a small SSD is more likely to see higher sector reuse than a large drive simply because it will likely have less free space on it (unless you spend considerable amount of time pruning your recordings).
Over-provisioning is usually pretty light on cheap drives (the type that is most commonly used here for value comparisons) and to get the optimal provisioning setup often requires optional features that a DVR cannot offer control over. These SSDs with lots of cell cycles or over-provisioning are typically that much more expensive than the drives I've seen mentioned here. A 4TB WD Blue SSD (nothing to write home about) costs around four times that of a similarly sized WD Purple or Seagate Skyhawk surveillance drive (designed specifically for DVR use). The same is true for the Crucial MX SSDs.

My fundamental argument remains: HDDs typically last at least twice as long as most people have been running SSDs so it isn't proven that an SSD will obviously outlast an HDD. SSDs tend to be quite a bit more sensitive to heat than HDDs and that's especially troubling in devices that are often placed in situations of difficult cooling.
You don't seem to have a clue about SSD technology in detail.... or am simply cherry picking irrelevant data. Seems to be a habit here.

Yes there are quite a few details to consider when choosing technology but the DTV DVR is a benign environment. Of course you know that the better high speed rotational drives generate and are more sensitive to heat than the better SSDs, (data centers need a lot of cooling) and that they need to be slowed down to survive in a hot environment like an automobile application., or is that one of the details you chose to overlook. Years ago we were putting industrial SSDs into equipment that operates at 120C to 200C, places where high capacity HDs plates/heads had a tendency to warp. If you want to get an assessment of what works well in a hot, demanding environment, look at what is used in automobiles and trucks. Both technologies have a broad spectrum of products and you cannot make generalizations... unless you are a politician and attempting to prove a point by cherry picking data. For example you could pick out that when a SSD fails it is dead, there is no chance to recover data. Perhaps a bad thing in a video surveillance system (something to mitigate) but not that important for temporary video.... we can go on for days but the kids want me to head out to the swimming hole, We are talking specifically about the DVR application in a home here... a discussion of the limits may be interesting, but irrelevant here.

Constantly writing small bits of data does not hurt most SSDs and can hurt a rotational drive if its has to constantly seek sectors (the writes are not in sequence). But do you know the data chunk size and if it is always written to the same sector/address. That would be hard on a rotational drive while its recording. In both case an properly behaving OS can help or hurt. :)

Bottom line, you can read marketing literature and study text books, but the kinds of things relevant to the DTV DVR are implemented as trade secretes and full of compromises. One has to try them out to be assured of satisfactory performance. There seems to be quite a few brands/models here that have demonstrated long and satisfactory results in a DTV DRR. So obviously some SSD tech works well here as well as some rotational drives.
 

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Beware the Attack Basset
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Years ago we were putting industrial SSDs into equipment that operates at 120C to 200C, places where high capacity HDs plates/heads had a tendency to warp.
This is some of what I'm railing at. Comparing enterprise or industrial gear to the $60 drives commonly discussed here.
But do you know the data chunk size and if it is always written to the same sector/address. That would be hard on a rotational drive while its recording.
Did you know that unless you're talking about certain system sectors that are redundant, EXT format doesn't rewrite sectors at all? EXT writes to a free block and then links to the new block.
 

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SSDs don't have any moving parts and can handle temps as good / better then HDs. On a HD if your usage pattern is watch and delete, you're just going to keep writing to the same parts of the platters, so you'll just wind up abusing the outer tracks of the drive (which is bad) and the other 90% will never be touched. Although you could just mark them as bad and then the abuse the next most outer most tracks lol. With an SSD they have wear leveling, so if you follow the same pattern, it will spread it out evenly.

Besides, most SSDs now are over 1M hours MTBF.
 

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On a HD if your usage pattern is watch and delete, you're just going to keep writing to the same parts of the platters, so you'll just wind up abusing the outer tracks of the drive (which is bad) and the other 90% will never be touched.
Magnetizing and de-magnetizing the surface of a hard drive platter doesn't cause physical damage as there is no physical contact with the platter. We're not talking Commodore Datasettes here.

The big part of the wear and tear is probably the pivot bearings for the head support arms and that would logically be reduced in an "outer tracks" scenario.

MTBF is relatively academic as the numbers for most modern storage devices run well upwards of 100 years. The meaningful metric for SSD life is TeraBytes Written (TBW). Because SSD lifetime is mostly write activity sensitive, it much better predicts what is likely to happen.

A WD Blue SSD drive has a 600TBW estimated life. The number given to the Crucial MX500 is 700TBW. The actual numbers can vary greatly depending on how full the drive is kept.

A note about heat and power consumption: Western Digital Blue class SSDs burn up to 3.8 watts when writing. Their idle consumption is 60Mw. A 4TB Blue HDD consumes 4.8W when active and 3.1W when idle. Given the greater surface area of the hard drive, the HDD may have a distinct heat sink advantage compared to a plastic-enclosed SSD.

An enterprise class SSD consumes 4.6W when idle!.
 

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as far as wear and tear on a ssd inside an HR genie, say in my case, i have an hr54 with 2 clients. i have a 1tb ssd with a 800TBW rating.

i rarely record much, but i watch a lot of buffered tv. almost all tv i watch is buffered at least 30 minutes or more. with buffered tv on 2 clients and watching buffered tv on the genie at the same time, how does that type of wear compare with record & delete? is buffered tv the same as watching a continuous recording? having 3 buffers going with the occasional double play on the genie doing too much damage to the ssd? i havent check the smart data in a while but the last time i did, i was doing around 3 TB of writes per month.
 

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as far as wear and tear on a ssd inside an HR genie, say in my case, i have an hr54 with 2 clients. i have a 1tb ssd with a 800TBW rating.

i rarely record much, but i watch a lot of buffered tv. almost all tv i watch is buffered at least 30 minutes or more. with buffered tv on 2 clients and watching buffered tv on the genie at the same time, how does that type of wear compare with record & delete? is buffered tv the same as watching a continuous recording? having 3 buffers going with the occasional double play on the genie doing too much damage to the ssd? i havent check the smart data in a while but the last time i did, i was doing around 3 TB of writes per month.
If you are using getting 3 TB of writes per month your SSD will outlive not only your HR24, but maybe Directv's satellite service itself...
 

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The concern with SSDs is when the drive capacity gets loaded up. When there are few unused blocks to write to, the drive either has to shift everything around or beat on the few blocks that it has free. Neither is a desirable situation but if you aren't sloppy about maintaining your library, they can be avoided.
 

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about how full does a ssd have to be before it becomes an issue? what recordings i do have get deleted after watching. i rarely have more than 3 or 4 at a time, watch and delete on weekends. few days ago when visiting my brother, who has the same setup except his dvr has a regular hdd with about 50 recordings, its slow as crap. press a button and wait type slow. i was amazed how faster mine is with the ssd.
 
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