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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I had a thought. I wonder if in the future they will make the power inserters also work as the grounding block?

With the SWMLine in many cases the power inserter could be the first break in the line from the dish, and if it could work as a ground block as well it would eliminate another break in the line/another component.

I wonder if Directv has considered doing this?
 

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Grentz said:
So I had a thought. I wonder if in the future they will make the power inserters also work as the grounding block?

With the SWMLine in many cases the power inserter could be the first break in the line from the dish, and if it could work as a ground block as well it would eliminate another break in the line/another component.

I wonder if Directv has considered doing this?
No groundblock used here. They used a weird "splitter" at the base of the dish. I assume that is the grounding block too...since everything works here including caller ID
 

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Hrm, is the SWS supposed to be used as the grounding block for the SWMLine install then? I guess I am curious what the proper way to ground the SWMLine dish is then.

I know with the SWM-8 it was recommended to still go through the grounding block for the lines before they got to the SWM-8 (from the ODU), but on the SWMLine it is obviously a bit different.
 

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Grentz said:
So I had a thought. I wonder if in the future they will make the power inserters also work as the grounding block?

With the SWMLine in many cases the power inserter could be the first break in the line from the dish, and if it could work as a ground block as well it would eliminate another break in the line/another component.

I wonder if Directv has considered doing this?
The SWM module itself can serve as a ground block, according to DirecTV. Since the PI should be indoors, not sure I want it to serve that function.
 

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Grentz said:
Hrm, is the SWS supposed to be used as the grounding block for the SWMLine install then? I guess I am curious what the proper way to ground the SWMLine dish is then.

I know with the SWM-8 it was recommended to still go through the grounding block for the lines before they got to the SWM-8 (from the ODU), but on the SWMLine it is obviously a bit different.
Well my SWMLine goes to what you refferred to maybe as the "sws". I watched this install s to how it was done. He went directly from there to the attic. My old setup went from the Dish > GB > splitter. He did an awesome job. He said "i''m thier lead installer. It showed with his work. I didnt ask directly about the grounding block becuase it was obvious he knew exactly what he was doing.
 

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My SWMLine has a grounding block before it goes into the house. Without it I'd think any surge that went through the coaxial would just flow through the PI.
 

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bwaldron said:
The SWM module itself can serve as a ground block, according to DirecTV. Since the PI should be indoors, not sure I want it to serve that function.
The SWM-8 (and I think the -5 too) has the two ground screws in the upper right hand corner of the unit just above the SWM1/power port. I had assumed that this would serve as the ground block. Line from the dish to the SWM-8, from there straight to the ground rod. Wires from the SWM-8 would be entering the house right away.

Is this correct?

Tony
 

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When I had an SWM-5, I used it as a grounding block in the way you described.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Guys, I realize how the SWM-5/8 work and that they just act as the grounding block in many cases. But with the SWMLine there is no separate SWM module besides the PI which was why I was asking ;)

veryoldschool said:
I had one once too, but it got lonely.

The ground block is still needed before it enters the house, per code.

Using a splitter could function for the same thing if it's grounded.
Ok, that makes sense, never mind on the thought then. I forgot/didn't totally realize that the ground point for this kind of system needs to be outside per code :lol:

I am always thinking on this kind of stuff, just try to mention the rough thoughts I think have any worth while points to share :)
 

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Why don't they just put a metal spring (not coil type, the tab type) on the mounting boss for the SWMline LNB? Then the LNB will be grounded to the frame of the dish, then you just ground that and the whole shebang is grounded. No need for a grounding block before you enter, but you still need a drip loop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
flipptyfloppity said:
Why don't they just put a metal spring (not coil type, the tab type) on the mounting boss for the SWMline LNB? Then the LNB will be grounded to the frame of the dish, then you just ground that and the whole shebang is grounded. No need for a grounding block before you enter, but you still need a drip loop.
Hrm, that sounds pretty good as well. Wonder if that passes the grounding rules?
 

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Grentz said:
Hrm, that sounds pretty good as well. Wonder if that passes the grounding rules?
Code is written to define a requirement.
What would work, might differ from code.
Mine, for example, doesn't have ground blocks, but the mast is grounded [in the earth], and the dish is connected to it. My wiring then goes through underground conduit.
If this were to be "inspected", it might fail code, but if the inspector had any electrical knowledge, I could "prove" to him that it is, in fact, grounded.
"I think" it really comes down to "the letter" of the code, or the intention of the code. Those that can't understand the difference, would fail it, while those that understand the purpose, would pass it.

As you might guess, I've been a trouble maker for most of my life. :lol:
 

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Grentz said:
So I had a thought. I wonder if in the future they will make the power inserters also work as the grounding block?
Considering what happens to coax when it is hit directly by lightning and the general badness of the event; worst case scenario you send a fireball into you 110 AC outlet your PI is plugged into and also into the receiver its at.

Grentz said:
With the SWMLine in many cases the power inserter could be the first break in the line from the dish, and if it could work as a ground block as well it would eliminate another break in the line/another component.
No break for the splitter? A SWMline LNB is a bit of a waste for just one receiver.
 

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There is a ground screw on the SWS splitter. But only one and I am not sure if you can combine the #17 from the ODU to the #10 to the ground in that one hole.

And personally I would never put a SWS on the outside of he house.

I think the SWMLine still needs ODU >--coax+#17-->groundblock>--#10-->ground
 

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Mertzen said:
There is a ground screw on the SWS splitter. But only one and I am not sure if you can combine the #17 from the ODU to the #10 to the ground in that one hole.

And personally I would never put a SWS on the outside of he house.

I think the SWMLine still needs ODU >--coax+#17-->groundblock>--#10-->ground
If not "needs", "should have" at least.
Grounding will bleed off any static build up, can't hurt for stronger charges, but may not "save you" from lightning.
 

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veryoldschool said:
Code is written to define a requirement.
What would work, might differ from code.
Mine, for example, doesn't have ground blocks, but the mast is grounded [in the earth], and the dish is connected to it. My wiring then goes through underground conduit.
If this were to be "inspected", it might fail code, but if the inspector had any electrical knowledge, I could "prove" to him that it is, in fact, grounded.
"I think" it really comes down to "the letter" of the code, or the intention of the code. Those that can't understand the difference, would fail it, while those that understand the purpose, would pass it.

As you might guess, I've been a trouble maker for most of my life. :lol:
I don't know about "code" for satellite installs, but the normal thing for cell phone and broadcast installs is to ground the feedline at the tower and at the entrance to the building.

My dish is grounded by the pole and at the multiswitch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Personally from what I have seen from lightning, grounding is really only for static/floating ground reasons anyhow. If lightning hits your dish your stuff is gone anyways.

I have seen plenty of examples of lightning hitting a house down the street and blowing all the electronics in someone elses house. If lightning hits your dish, you are gonna have some serious problems that even a ground block cannot prevent :eek:
 

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Grentz said:
Personally from what I have seen from lightning, grounding is really only for static/floating ground reasons anyhow. If lightning hits your dish your stuff is gone anyways.

I have seen plenty of examples of lightning hitting a house down the street and blowing all the electronics in someone elses house. If lightning hits your dish, you are gonna have some serious problems that even a ground block cannot prevent :eek:
An aluminum ground wire would surely vaporize, meaning the rest of the current goes through the frame. I'm pretty sure a copper #6 would too. To be honest, I think at this point you're just managing the size of the scorch marks the wires and equipment will leave when they go.
 
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