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AllStar
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This is very interesting......first I've ever seen of this stuff. Has anyone else had any experience using this? Earl, does this make sense to you? It's always been my understanding that the moisture in the atmosphere would affect reception far more than the moisture on the dish......just the opposite of what this ad says. If what this ad says is true, we could all just put RainX on our dishes and do away with rainfade. Seems too good to be true.

Sorry.....forgot the link.....here it is....http://www.sadoun.com/Sat/Products/kings-control/Rain-Shield-Fade-Solution.htm
 

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1Indy79 said:
This is very interesting......first I've ever seen of this stuff. Has anyone else had any experience using this? Earl, does this make sense to you? It's always been my understanding that the moisture in the atmosphere would affect reception far more than the moisture on the dish......just the opposite of what this ad says. If what this ad says is true, we could all just put RainX on our dishes and do away with rainfade. Seems too good to be true.

Sorry.....forgot the link.....here it is....http://www.sadoun.com/Sat/Products/kings-control/Rain-Shield-Fade-Solution.htm
Don't waste your money. Keeping freezing rain/ice/snow of the surface of the dish (from large build-up) is fine....but just "moisture" is bull.

The attenuation is between the antenna and the thunderstorm (heavy concentration of drops/hail), not between the LNBs and the dish itself. The loss of signal due to ice/snow buildup on the reflector is caused by a loss of focus (the reflector no longer concentrates the signal to the LNB because the dish is now "deformed". It is NOT loss due to moisture, it is loss due to deformation of the surface. A reflector of this type needs to be within 1% of true shape before losses increase significantly. Ice and snow build-up temporarily deform the dish (form a new surface, they don't actually bend the dish) and cause it's focus to be lost, and it's gain to go down.
 

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AllStar
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I haven't heard the deformed theory before, but I find it hard to believe my dish geometry changes any significant amount with snow on it. It's been a few years since my EE fields and waves class, but I think the attenuation is predominantly due to the path through water. One way to verify this would be to have a dish in a protected location (say under a patio roof) while a heavy rainstorm is active. Another test would be to run water on your dish with a garden hose. The question is where is the region that creates the most attenuation? The thin film of water on your dish or all the water in the atmosphere between your dish and the sat?

All that said, I think the product looks pretty hokey. The only thing I could possibly see is it would make the dish a little slicker and some wet snow might shed more quickly. Why not just put some car wax on there? It would be a lot cheaper.
 

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Personally I don't think you need it, but the cost seems pricey. Find out what the active ingredients are and buy a generic spray. It's seems your paying for the name or brand. :D
 

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AllStar
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I had my signal go out completely during a light rain. I think it was water getting into my cables and/or LNBs, but I did notice that my D* dish had water beading on it. I had just switched from E* and that dish had no beads of water on it.

Haven't done the math, but I imagine that a when an incident ray hits a raindrop bead, part of the ray would reflect and part would be refracted. Both of these effects could reduce the amount of signal hitting the LNB.

Of course the amount of signal that is reflected and the angle of refraction may be insignificant. And the surface area covered by the beads also may not be enough to make a difference in the signal degredation.
 

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Up The Irons!
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Regardless of what they say on that link Id be VERY leery of spraying anything on the LNBs.
 

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Legend
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That reminds me of those $50 "audiophile" wall outlets and $30 "audiophile" wall outlet cover plates that connect to cheap romex house wire. Likewise for those multi-hundred dollar power cords that are plugged into builder-grade house wiring. Nothing wrong with it, just don't expect many to agree about any differences, except your wallet being lighter!
 

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Mallard said:
I had my signal go out completely during a light rain. I think it was water getting into my cables and/or LNBs, but I did notice that my D* dish had water beading on it. I had just switched from E* and that dish had no beads of water on it.

Haven't done the math, but I imagine that a when an incident ray hits a raindrop bead, part of the ray would reflect and part would be refracted. Both of these effects could reduce the amount of signal hitting the LNB.

Of course the amount of signal that is reflected and the angle of refraction may be insignificant. And the surface area covered by the beads also may not be enough to make a difference in the signal degredation.
Get your dish realigned it should not go out in less than a downpour, and I mean downpour
 
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