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· Hall Of Fame
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From Fox News:

CBS newsman Mike Wallace, the dogged, merciless reporter and interviewer who took on politicians, celebrities and other public figures in a 60-year career highlighted by the on-air confrontations that helped make "60 Minutes" the most successful primetime television news program ever, has died. He was 93.
Wallace died Saturday night, CBS spokesman Kevin Tedesco said.
Wallace said then that he had long vowed to retire "when my toes turn up" and "they're just beginning to curl a trifle. ... It's become apparent to me that my eyes and ears, among other appurtenances, aren't quite what they used to be."
Among his later contributions, after bowing out as a regular, was a May 2007 profile of GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney, and an interview with Kevorkian, the assisted suicide doctor released from prison in June 2007 who died June 3, 2011, at age 83.
In December 2007, Wallace landed the first interview with Clemens after the star pitcher was implicated in the Mitchell report on performance enhancing drugs in baseball. The interview, in which Clemens maintained his innocence, was broadcast in early January 2008.
Wallace was the first man hired when late CBS news producer Don Hewitt put together the staff of "60 Minutes" at its inception in 1968. The show wasn't a hit at first, but it worked its way up to the top 10 in the 1977-78 season and remained there, season after season, with Wallace as one of its mainstays. Among other things, it proved there could be big profits in TV journalism.
 

· Old Guys Rule!
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I remember Mike Wallace from when I was a young boy in Chicago. Myron Wallace (his real name) starred in a radio program called "The Crime Files of Flamond" and was a radio personality in Chicago, later moving on to TV.
He attracted a lot of attention from the media when he married actress Buff Cobb and the two of them had a TV talk show called "Mike and Buff". They divorced some years later.
During his years on "60 Minutes", he was known to be a tough interviewer.

RIP, Mike!
 

· 1*
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A great loss to the world of journalism.

- Merg
 

· Hall Of Fame
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I remember when Wallace got the guys in the meat industry for changing the grading on USDA graded beef. He suckered two employees into thinking they were participating in benign, educational film interviews on meat grading, and they were being very candid and friendly and then he zonked each of them. He asked a meat grader if it was possible to change the grading on a side of beef and the guy said it wasn't because each side of beef was stamped with an official stamp and showed his stamper to Wallace, but some co-worker had actually pilfered that meat grader's counterfeit stamper, and Wallace pulled it out of his pocket and said "What's this?" and the guy immediately knew it was his because its handle was different from the official ones, and he grabbed it from Wallace and said "Where did you get that?" and then he really cracked. He started to pace back and forth and mumbled, "...you try to do a guy a favor and this is what happens". Then Wallace zonked a supermarket manager who was showing him the contents of a meat case in an aisle and Wallace asked him why one of the meat suppliers paid half the annual operating expenses of his yacht, and the guy ordered him to leave the store. A friend of mine who watched 60 Minutes in that same era said he zonked the poultry industry the same way.
 

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AntAltMike said:
I remember when Wallace got the guys in the meat industry for changing the grading on USDA graded beef. He suckered two employees into thinking they were participating in benign, educational film interviews on meat grading, and they were being very candid and friendly and then he zonked each of them. He asked a meat grader if it was possible to change the grading on a side of beef and the guy said it wasn't because each side of beef was stamped with an official stamp and showed his stamper to Wallace, but some co-worker had actually pilfered that meat grader's counterfeit stamper, and Wallace pulled it out of his pocket and said "What's this?" and the guy immediately knew it was his because its handle was different from the official ones, and he grabbed it from Wallace and said "Where did you get that?" and then he really cracked. He started to pace back and forth and mumbled, "...you try to do a guy a favor and this is what happens". Then Wallace zonked a supermarket manager who was showing him the contents of a meat case in an aisle and Wallace asked him why one of the meat suppliers paid half the annual operating expenses of his yacht, and the guy ordered him to leave the store. A friend of mine who watched 60 Minutes in that same era said he zonked the poultry industry the same way.
Yeah, 60 Minutes is good at revealing stuff like that. I remember when they sent the same person to several H & R Block's to have his income tax prepared. Several had the person owing tax, a few had him breaking even and a couple had him getting a small return. They then had the IRS prepair the income tax. The results were the individule getting a larger return than the Block agent's results. They then confronted Henry Block with the discrepancies and asked why. You could tell his pucker factor went off the scale by the way he was squirming. My other favorite is when they sent a man to the same bank three times in the same day to apply for a small personal loan. On all three attempts his occupation, income, and credit were the same and the same loan manager conducted the interviews. On the first attempt he was disguised as a hippie and was flatly refused. The second attempt he was disguised as a blue collar worker and was told he needed a co-signer. With the third attempt they sent him to the bank clean cut wearing a business suit. He was granted the loan and without a co-signer. When they confronted the loan manager with the differences he was speechless.
 

· Superfly
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St. Peter is at his station at the Pearly Gates. He hears an angel say, "Mike Wallace is up next." Ducking out, St. Peter yells behind him, "Gabriel, I'm going on break. Cover for me, will you?"
 

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Carl Spock said:
St. Peter is at his station at the Pearly Gates. He hears an angel say, "Mike Wallace is up next." Ducking out, St. Peter yells behind him, "Gabriel, I'm going on break. Cover for me, will you?"
:thats: ...and God in the background, saying, "Whatever you do, Pete, don't let him in!" :lol:
 

· Hall Of Fame
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rhipps said:
This old Vietnam vet remembers "The Uncounted Enemy." More on this at http://www.museum.tv/eotvsection.php?entrycode=uncountedene...
Bob H.
I was fortunate enough to draw #236 in the second Draft lottery and so my "involvement" in the Vietnam was to make a few contributions to Letters-to-the Editor sections of local newspapers.

Just to benefit the youngins here who don't know any more about the Vietnam War than I knew of the Korean war, here is an excerpt from the above-linked article on the www.museum.tv site:

The most provocative scene features correspondent Mike Wallace interviewing Westmoreland. An extreme close-up captures the general trying to wet his dry mouth as Wallace fires questions. The visual image in conjunction with other program material suggests that Westmoreland engineered a conspiracy and, as viewers can see, he appears guilty. Westmoreland publicly rebuked these claims and demanded forty-five minutes of open airtime to reject The Uncounted Enemy assertions. CBS refused the request.
Another cheap stunt they pulled was to have some deferential, softly speaking interviewer ask Westmoreland questions to which Westmoreland responded in similar tone, but then they spliced Wallace asking the same or similar questions in an aggressive, prosecutorial tone, making Westmoreland's replies seem sheepish and cowering.

Quoting further from the linked article:

In the spring of 1982, a CBS News employee disclosed to TV Guide that producer George Crile had violated network standards in making the program. The 24 May story by Sally Bedell and Don Kowet, "Anatomy of a Smear: How CBS News Broke the Rules and 'Got' Gen. Westmoreland," stipulated how the production strayed from accepted practices.

Significantly, TV Guide never disputed the premise of the program. The writers attacked the journalistic process, pointing out, for instance, that Crile screened interviews of other participants for one witness and then shot a second interview, that he avoided interviewing witnesses who would counter his thesis, and that answers to various questions were edited into a single response.
Keep in mind that this CBS report was produced fourteen years after the Tet offensive, nine years after we had removed all of our troops and seven years after Saigon fell. It was simply a retrospective smear job on Westmoreland, who had acquitted himself honorably in a chapter of American military and political history that is regrettably not seen much clearer today than it was back then.

The most enthralling television interview I have ever seen was of Westmoreland on, of all places, the old Tom Snyder "Tomorrow" show, but the interviewer that evening... I mean, morning...wasn't the imbecilic Snyder. Tomorrow's guest host that night was a relatively unknown Canadian newsman who had only recently begun hosting a nightly newsprogram for PBS, Robert MacNeil.
 
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