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· Cool Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a new house and am going to use movers advantage to have my system installed.

I have been searching and researching some way to do a roof mount dish install, without having the wires running down the side of my house and haven't been able to find a solution.

Has anyone done anything like this? I am assuming a piece of conduit somehow running up to the roof from the inside of the house? It doesn't matter how, I just need to make sure that there is no wire running down the side of the house (or at least very minimal wire).

Thanks in advance!
 

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I had 4 lines run from the attic to a wiring closet. The wiring closet had all the connections for the house (phone, cable, ethernet, etc.) run to each room. When D* came out, they put the dish on the roof and connected the 4 lines in my attic to it. The multiswitch was put in the wiring closet and connected to all the lines running to the various rooms. The wiring closet is also where my Vonage and internet routers are located.
 

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I have two examples.

One is what they do on top of commercial (flat) roofs: It's nothing more than a 2" (more or less) pipe, with metal flashing, that goes through the roof and into the "attic" space. It's not typically an attic, rather the space between the suspended ceiling and the roof. After the wires are run through the pipe, the pipe is filled with a very thick roofing tar to keep out water. The tar never really sets up, so the wires can be serviced, or wires added, if needed. There are typically a dozen such pipes on the commercial roofs I've seen.

The other method I have seen (and I like this better) is a j-box (junction box) mounted to the pipe, so that when attached to the pipe, and the j-box is closed, it's weather proof and easier to work on. In this case only the wires going into the j-box need to be sealed. It's nice if you can mount the j-box on a vertical surface, say a chimney or another part of the roof (not sure what the correct term is, but roofs have multiple parts and there is almost always a "wall" above the roof somewhere). Though I have seen them mounted flat too (with some major sealing around the bottom).

I've also seen installs where pipes, in a upside down "J" shape (so that water can't fall into the pipe), are used. Now blocking water is not so important, but some seal is requires (foam typically) to keep critters out.

Lastly, I've seen coax run through existing vents on the roof... But having long runs of unsecured coax resting against a shingled roof is a problem just waiting to happen...

Many ways to do this... It's whatever works best for you. Just make sure the installer will do the job you want... I've read a lot of threads where the installers have guidelines on where the dish can go (usually in such a way as the installer does not have to leave the ladder). Of course they are just guidelines, and each install is unique.

PS. Next time I'm on a roof, I'll take some pictures...
 

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Someone pointed me to this product a few months ago when I was looking at moving into a new home that had no existing wiring. I thought this would be a nice clean install with the wiring making its way into the attic of the place we were looking at.

http://www.rstcenterprises.com/our_products/commdeck.phtml
 

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I have seen a few new construction houses that have a 6" pipe run from the attic to the crawl space in the vicinity of the electric bond. Sometimes this is not the best place for a dish but when all is correctly done it can be neat. All the cable, including the ground rub down the pipe (conduit) to where the interior cables are bundled.

Stacking closets on each floor also allows vertical cable runs without too much visual effect.

Joe
 

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I think the Commdeck is a great idea on a new residential install. There are lots of exceptions, however, including pole mount if you have a clear line of sight from the ground level. It keeps all of the wiring inside the attic/house so there is no issue of moisture in the connections, etc.

Also, a central wiring closet makes a lot of sense. Make sure the builder will run two or even three RG-6 cables to each outlet if you plan to use DVR's and OTA. Perhaps ask for CAT-5e runs as well. Some builders charge through the nose for this and won't allow you or a third party home theater installer put the runs in.
 

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Sharkie_Fan said:
Someone pointed me to this product a few months ago when I was looking at moving into a new home that had no existing wiring. I thought this would be a nice clean install with the wiring making its way into the attic of the place we were looking at.

http://www.rstcenterprises.com/our_products/commdeck.phtml
Do they have a model for the dishes (5-LNB) that have the extra stabilizer legs (I didn't see it)? Or can the legs compensate for the extra height of that base?
 

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What I did in this situation was. I had the house built and the wires were left hanging out the back of the house. (it looked meeesy) when D* cam I had a pole mount up and the trench dug. They ran the wires to where they went into the house. We put a waterproof box up there. Installed the multi-switch and hooked up to the house. When I filled the trench all you could see was the box on the back of my house behind the a/c unit. It was really nice setup for me.
 

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EricJRW said:
Do they have a model for the dishes (5-LNB) that have the extra stabilizer legs (I didn't see it)? Or can the legs compensate for the extra height of that base?
The "S Style STrut Clips" affix to the roof in a similar manner as the "base unit" (under the shingles), and can be used for attaching the monopoles.

http://www.rstcenterprises.com/our_products/strutclip.phtml
 

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lincolnnellie said:
It doesn't matter how, I just need to make sure that there is no wire running down the side of the house (or at least very minimal wire).

Thanks in advance!
Just have the builder run 4 wires from your wiring panel or attic junction to the soffit/eave in the spot you want to put the dish. Put the dish on the roof right above that point, and just wrap the wires from the dish around the fascia and put the ground block up under the soffit. Then, all you have to do is run a 10 gauge ground wire from the ground block down the wall, so pick a spot close to your ground source. Better than having that big leak potential over your living area.
 

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Before I decided to re-roof the house and put up the tower, I was going to remove the chimney chase currently holding up the dish and replace it with an appropriately sized galv pipe (with J bend to keep water out) that would be secured in the attic over the garage and extend up through the roof and be sealed to the shingles. The mast would be secured in at least two places to the trusses (with a bolt through the bottom end to secure it from rotating) and would allow the wire to be fed up and out the hook of the J and then down the side of the mast to the dish. At the other end, the wire would enter the garage in the ceiling, run down the wall and into the basement where it would be routed appropriately.

But... I like that roof mount better... that is one slick little device!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions, keep em coming.

I have 2 dvrs, and 3 other receivers for a total of 7 cables. Does that mean that I need to "pre-wire" to the dish install point with 7 cables, or should I just give him enough to put the multiswitch in the central wiring point? I guess that would be however many the multiswitch needs (4?) from the cwp to the dish mount.

Oh and I live in 54476, I think I still need the seperate dish for locals.

Let me know how many cables to run from the central point to the dish mount (if I am able to keep the multiswitch inside).
 

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No, you only need 4 lines from the mounting location to the utility room (where the multiswitch will go). From the utility room, you'll run your other 7 lines to their destination points.

I'd advise you to run more than 7 lines though, as you never know what the future might bring. When I built my house, I ran 2 lines to each room that might ever have a TV (and 4 lines to the living room and HT room).

Additionally, make sure to run ethernet to all the rooms in the house. Even though most things can be done wirelessly, it's nice to have hardwired connections available everywhere and there's no better time to do it then during the build.


PS. Get all your speaker locations wired too.
 

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spartanstew said:
No, you only need 4 lines from the mounting location to the utility room (where the multiswitch will go). From the utility room, you'll run your other 7 lines to their destination points.

I'd advise you to run more than 7 lines though, as you never know what the future might bring. When I built my house, I ran 2 lines to each room that might ever have a TV (and 4 lines to the living room and HT room).

Additionally, make sure to run ethernet to all the rooms in the house. Even though most things can be done wirelessly, it's nice to have hardwired connections available everywhere and there's no better time to do it then during the build.
==============================================
NOTE: "4 lines from the slimline dish mounting location + 2 lines from the second dish used for the locals (on the 72 degree sat)
Joe
==============================================
PS. Get all your speaker locations wired too.
NOTE
 

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My bad Joe, missed that. Didn't realize there were still folks that would need a seperate dish for locals.



So, yes, Nellie, you'd need 6 lines running from the mounting location to the utility room.
 

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If you were to do something like the mount that I pointed out, you might consider running a 7th wire, in the event that you want to run OTA at some point, rather than pulling a cable later.... I've only used OTA for the last couple of years, but I don't know if I could live without it now! Especially since I don't have HD locals from DirecTV.

And as spartanstew pointed out, run ethernet & phone to wherever you might want it. I've been working for months on getting my networking & satellite & speakers all cleaned up. Our house was originally done for cable - and done poorly with cables coming up through the floor in the various rooms that needed cable drops. I'm getting so tired of fishing cabling to the different parts of the house it's not funny!

So much better to do it before hand if you can!
 
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