DBSTalk Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· AllStar
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had a self-installed 3 LNB oval upgraded to a AU9S KaKu 5 LNB Slimline by Direct Tech New England and I must say that the rain haze issue that had plagued my old Dish is all but a distant memory! :allthumbs

When I pointed my old dish, I always had high signal readings on the A & B satelltites, but the C was mid 80's at best and usually in the 60's and 70's. That was the best I could do. Even a moderate rain storm would knock out most of my channels and always the HD ones. The SD locals seemed to be pretty rock solid, but anything on the C dish was usually toast relatively quickly. Even my OTA antenna outperformed them. Right now we are in the midst of the fallout from a tropical depression and it's been rock solid with only a "Searching on tuner two 771..." message briefly and rarely. My old setup would be gone by now, without a doubt.

Is it typical for this new Slimline 5 LNB dish to reduce or eliminate this problem? My Father-in-law got the older, bigger, uglier AT9 version and his goes out all the time (which was one of the reasons I avoided this witch until I was all but forced to). I realize his look at the SW may be less ideal then mine but...

BTW, my new dish is pretty much in the same exact place my 3LNB stood and nothing in the environment has been changed (e.g. trees, etc.). The tech couldn't get on top to use the built in level on the mast, as it's at the peak of my roof, so I gave him a small two foot level and it seems to be working great.
 

· Hall Of Fame
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
HDinMA said:
I recently had a self-installed 3 LNB oval upgraded to a AU9S KaKu 5 LNB Slimline by Direct Tech New England and I must say that the rain haze issue that had plagued my old Dish is all but a distant memory! :allthumbs

When I pointed my old dish, I always had high signal readings on the A & B satelltites, but the C was mid 80's at best and usually in the 60's and 70's. That was the best I could do. Even a moderate rain storm would knock out most of my channels and always the HD ones. The SD locals seemed to be pretty rock solid, but anything on the C dish was usually toast relatively quickly. Even my OTA antenna outperformed them. Right now we are in the midst of the fallout from a tropical depression and it's been rock solid with only a "Searching on tuner two 771..." message briefly and rarely. My old setup would be gone by now, without a doubt.

Is it typical for this new Slimline 5 LNB dish to reduce or eliminate this problem? My Father-in-law got the older, bigger, uglier AT9 version and his goes out all the time (which was one of the reasons I avoided this witch until I was all but forced to). I realize his look at the SW may be less ideal then mine but...

BTW, my new dish is pretty much in the same exact place my 3LNB stood and nothing in the environment has been changed (e.g. trees, etc.). The tech couldn't get on top to use the built in level on the mast, as it's at the peak of my roof, so I gave him a small two foot level and it seems to be working great.
It's more likely that your old dish wasn't aligned to aquire peak signal strength priorly; and the new installation is simply better aimed auring installation.

Although the new dish is larger; it is so because it has to skim 5 different oribital location which actually leaves less pan surface area per satellite; thus my comment above.
 

· AllStar
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yoda-DBSguy said:
It's more likely that your old dish wasn't aligned to aquire peak signal strength priorly; and the new installation is simply better aimed auring installation.

Although the new dish is larger; it is so because it has to skim 5 different oribital location which actually leaves less pan surface area per satellite; thus my comment above.
Probably so, but as I stated, I got the "best" signal on the C after much trial and error I could and the A & B were very high readings. I couldn't find a happy medium to get all three and was surprised that one would do a better job for FIVE. So I guess that was my point.
 

· Hall Of Fame
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
Take no offense to this in any way; however a professional installaer uses a meter to peak signal rather then a consumer trying to use the meter built into the IRD itself.

The use of a meter as well as making sure the mast is perfectly level makes all the differance in the world in terms of aquiring the maximum signal possible for the 101 and 119 sats which with the fine adjustment controls on the new dish allows tweaking of the remaining 110,99 and 103 sats.

A good high balance between all sats should be observed after proper installation.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top