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AllStar
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am the president of a HOA and longtime Directv customer.

Following a bad hail storm our town homes are getting new roofs and vinyl siding.

With that said, we are going with Commdeck and will have cable run attic. Coaxial is already up there which runs through the home.

What we are moving away from is cabling that runs down the side of the home and drilled into the side. As time goes on cables start sagging and what not.

Yesterday I was informed Directv and Dish Network no longer install on the roof. Is this true?

Is common practice to drill through the siding and placing a coaxial box on the inside?

Or do you have other options?
Thank you in advance for suggestions
 

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Beware the Attack Basset
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Yesterday I was informed Directv and Dish Network no longer install on the roof. Is this true?
Due to insurance reasons as well as some OSHA regulations regarding required safety devices (mostly fall protection but also that some setups require multiple personnel), the installers are generally no longer allowed to leave their ladders. If they can reach that mounting point from the ladder, then they may be allowed to put the dish on an edge of the roof.

The alternative is metal pole mounts on the ground or perhaps something like a commdeck mounted within reach on a vertical surface.
Is common practice to drill through the siding and placing a coaxial box on the inside?
I'm not sure I understand the question. There needs to be a way to get the cable(s) into the home as well as somewhere to secure the grounding block near the cable entrance. Junction boxes are not usually part of an installation.
 

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New Member
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Both companies have moved away from roof installs as much as is humanly possible but it is still done. It's still common practice to drill through the exterior wall, the cable companies have control over the cable lines going into the house and dish and direct are not allowed to touch them so they have to run all new lines.
 

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AllStar
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Due to insurance reasons as well as some OSHA regulations regarding required safety devices (mostly fall protection but also that some setups require multiple personnel), the installers are generally no longer allowed to leave their ladders. If they can reach that mounting point from the ladder, then they may be allowed to put the dish on an edge of the roof.

The alternative is metal pole mounts on the ground or perhaps something like a commdeck mounted within reach on a vertical surface.

I'm not sure I understand the question. There needs to be a way to get the cable(s) into the home as well as somewhere to secure the grounding block near the cable entrance. Junction boxes are not usually part of an installation.
Thank you, I am all for safety and that makes sense.

Yeah I know junction boxes are ideal, but drilled hole and silicone isn’t I deal.
 

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Super Moderator
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Yesterday I was informed Directv and Dish Network no longer install on the roof. Is this true?
The installers sent out by DISH and DIRECTV are no longer allowed to leave their ladders to work on a roof install. Local installers set their own work rules. It will cost more than a standard install but you are more likely to end up with the installation you want.

What service does the HOA currently support? DIRECTV? DISH? A cable company? Nothing?
What sort of facilities are you planning? Shared dishes or a single run from an antenna to each unit?


... the cable companies have control over the cable lines going into the house and dish and direct are not allowed to touch them so they have to run all new lines.
Every company has a line of demarcation where their wire ends and the customer's wires begin. To claim that all cable running into a house is controlled by the cable company ignores the truth. At my house the cable demarc box was installed outside and a cable I ran was connected to their service inside that box. If you are claiming the cable company owns a cable I ran then you are stupid.

For shared buildings ... apartments, multiple units, condos ... there is usually a centralized "cable" system that is owned by the complex. Some complexes will contract with a cable company to install and maintain that system. Others will pay an independent contractor (low voltage or "structured cable" company) to install and maintain the system. The last apartment I lived in was pre-wired but "the cable company" was not involved at all (one could not even subscribe to the local cable company's service). In that case one would need to deal with the building owner for what could be done with shared utilities.

For the most part DISH and DIRECT will run their own cable because they know what they are running and do not need to debug someone else's cabling work. They don't have to worry about a poor quality cable or connector somewhere in the system that turns their two hour install into a two day nightmare.

There are apartments and condos pre-wired for DISH and DIRECTV. Larger dishes and a professionally engineered distribution system to make sure the signal is good to every outlet.
 

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New roof here on house, four car garage and another building, with vinyl siding on a 100+ year old home.

No way would I let them touch the roof, siding or overhang because I am not spending big $ to have it repaired down the road. If we opt for the Dish Network it will be a pole install or no install.
 

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Beware the Attack Basset
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There are ways to work with even the most demanding customers unless they don't want to be worked with.
 
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