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· Legend
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102 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have become obsessed with getting my signal strength up in the 90s. I can't seem to get them up there, and it's bothering me.

First, I've read several threads here regarding the topic. Can't seem to find one that helps me specifically.
I've seen this post: Supplemental Alignment Tips
I've been to http://www.dishpointer.com/ and http://www.satsig.net/

I have a Phase III/Triplesat dish.
Lat 43 Long 88
Zip Code 53219

I've climbed up to the dish and adjusted it myself.
According to the markings on the dish I've got it at Elevation=40 and Tilt=68. I know the websites say my elevation should be around 36, but then my signal strengths are in the 50s. Maybe the azimuth is off but I don't know how to check that.
I don't have anything that would be obstructing my view of the southern sky.
This is the best I can seem to get on Sat 101...

Tuner 1
01-08 88 88 83 00 83 96 82 96
09-16 85 91 85 00 86 96 83 97
17-24 85 99 85 00 86 97 86 96
25-32 86 99 86 93 88 97 86 97

Tuner 2
01-08 87 87 82 00 83 96 82 96
09-16 82 89 85 00 86 96 84 97
17-24 85 99 86 00 85 97 86 96
25-32 86 99 87 94 88 96 86 97

I know those aren't that bad, but I should be able to get those up into the 90s, shouldn't I?
I've been told by D* that the best I can expect in my area is high 80's. Is that true?

I have a smaller house, so cable distance isn't an issue.

The coax cable is run right next to the power lines both outside my house and inside. But the power lines are in some kind of metal tubing. (I don't how to explain that.)

I've checked the connections in the house, and they mostly seem to be tight.

However the installer did use some existing coax cable that could be 5 to 10+ years old for all I know. (I've only had this house for 3 years.) One of them does seem to be a little loose and I can't tighten it anymore than it already is.

Before I go out and buy some new coax cable, could that even be my issue? Will this new cable get me the 5 extra points of signal strength I'm looking for?

Anything else that I should look at?
 

· Hall Of Fame
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8,968 Posts
Another poster mentioned that his even TPs were a little low on his SL3 LNB. It's likely that it's a manufacturing variation in the switch inside the LNB pack.

Regardless, you have excellent signal strength on 101, and you really should be focusing on 99(c) and 103(c), as even with high signal, they will lose signal faster than Ku frequencies anyway.
 

· Registered
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8,035 Posts
IIP said:
Another poster mentioned that his even TPs were a little low on his SL3 LNB. It's likely that it's a manufacturing variation in the switch inside the LNB pack.

Regardless, you have excellent signal strength on 101, and you really should be focusing on 99(c) and 103(c), as even with high signal, they will lose signal faster than Ku frequencies anyway.
I think the OP may have a Phase III/Triplesat dish, not a SL3.
 

· Legend
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102 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
RobertE said:
I think the OP may have a Phase III/Triplesat dish, not a SL3.
Yes, I do. My dish is over 3 years old now.

IIP said:
If that's the case, he's done, 'cause those signal strengths are great for a Triple-Sat.
I can accept that. I just hear about other people in my area getting 90's. They must have newer equipment.

And I don't have HD. I'm not positive, but since I only have SD, I think only SAT 101 is of any use to me.

Thanks for the help.
 

· Hall Of Fame
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8,968 Posts
The people getting 90's are generally those with Slimline dishes, which have a LOT more reflector surface (though it is defocused to cover all the LNBs).

High 80s is PLENTY. It's what I've had on my own Triple for years, and I lose signal only for a couple of seconds during the worst wind gusts in the biggest storms. For me, I stand a much greater chance of losing power than losing sat signal for more than 3 seconds at a time.
 

· Mentor
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43 Posts
High 80's is good. You have to remember that you are getting signal loss between the dish and the receiver as well. Inline connections, the wall plate, etc all affect sq. Also, different models of receivers show signal quality different. Just today I installed 2 standard receivers both on brand new lines from the same dish. One was a D11-500 and one a D11-100. The 500 showed signals from 97-99 on 101 and the 100 showed 93-94, and the 100 was a shorter run to the dish. Bottom line, if you are not having issues, don't worry about it.
 

· Legend
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102 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was having problems about a month ago, but that's when my signal was in the 50s and 60s, on a clear day. So a light rain or a little bit of cloud cover, and no TV. I don't know how it got that bad, but that's what started my "quest".

Like this weekend. It's pretty much been raining all weekend up here. Signal has been fine thou. Low 80s and a few high 70s.

So I've adjusted it to get the readings above, but just thought I should be able to get better than that. I'm really sick of the signal going out when it rains or when we have a snow up here.

I may still change out that old coax cable eventually. It is pretty old. I don't like that the one connection seems loose all the time, and if I move the cable it sounds..."brittle". (Know what I mean?)
 

· Mentor
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43 Posts
jhart05 said:
So I've adjusted it to get the readings above, but just thought I should be able to get better than that. I'm really sick of the signal going out when it rains or when we have a snow up here.
The 80's-90's should definitely help with the rain, but snow is a different story. Something sitting on the dish will cause problems. Bottom line. Even very dense snow clouds can cause issues. When I had my triple sat, I had signals from 96-99 and lost signal with really dense snow clouds even though the dish was clear. Just the price you have to pay for better TV I guess.
 
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