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Now for the tough part. If you don't have a PI-28 and SWM and have a regular setup, how much power is the dish and multiswitch in the dish taking? This can't be measured with a Kill-A-Watt because the power goes over the coax, not directly from an outlet.

This would be subtracted from the 18 watts to find the net increase. I would like to know the net increase of the SWM/PI, and I have no way to find it.
 

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rudeney said:
Maybe you could plug a single receiver into your multiswitch and dish, and plug it into the Kill-a-Watt, read the usage, then disconnect the coax from the receiver and calculate the difference?
That's how I would do it.

That or see the difference in receiver usage when connected to the SWM and when connected to the normal LNB/multiswitch.

In any event, a few watts is not very much on your power bill, but it does all add up.

I know my computers and refrigerators make up most of my power bill, I am very careful as well with usage.
 

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Well, my power bill runs about $400/mo in the summer when we’re running our whole-house refrigeration system (we like to keep the inside temp at 68F or below). The lowest power bill I ever have is in the $170/mo range. Honestly, I don’t think I’d notice any difference in power consumption of the SWM8 with PI + WB68 vs. the two WB68’s I used to have. My gues is that I just used more electricity on my PC tying this than the SWM added all day.
 

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Ya, the only good thing can come if you eliminate a lot of little things. We got rid of a lot of smaller things that were pulling power and it added up to some savings we could see on our bill.

But in any event, I am not too worried about the receiver or SWM, or frankly anything I use and gain lots of benefit from ;)
 

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Grentz said:
That's how I would do it.
That won't work, as the power usage of a receiver actually decoding video (cable connected) will be a lot different than one not decoding video (cable disconnected).

That or see the difference in receiver usage when connected to the SWM and when connected to the normal LNB/multiswitch.
That's a good idea, but a huge pain to try, as it requires rewiring my system to do the two cases.

In any event, a few watts is not very much on your power bill, but it does all add up.

I know my computers and refrigerators make up most of my power bill, I am very careful as well with usage.
That's incorrect that it's not much. A device that takes 18W continuously is roughly $18 a year on my electric bill (probably less for you if you live outside California). That's $1.50 a month. Given that my electric bill is about $25/month, it's a big change.

Refrigerators take a lot of power, but it'd be odd if your computers+refrigerators made up most of your power bill. Do you have a lot of refrigerators?
 

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Yes, we have one large deep freeze, 3 regular side by sides, and a wine refrigerator. Plus a lot of computers as well including a couple rigs that draw a fair amount of power. You are lucky your bill is only $25/mo, ours is more like $200-$250/mo and we have been very careful lately. When not careful it can be $300-$350/mo, especially with the A/C on. Another large contributor to our bill is our well and water treatment.

As I said, it does all add up though, we saved quite a bit turning off/unplugging/replacing things that were only drawing a few watts.
 

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flipptyfloppity said:
That's incorrect that it's not much. A device that takes 18W continuously is roughly $18 a year on my electric bill (probably less for you if you live outside California). That's $1.50 a month. Given that my electric bill is about $25/month, it's a big change.

Refrigerators take a lot of power, but it'd be odd if your computers+refrigerators made up most of your power bill. Do you have a lot of refrigerators?
At $0.11 per Kilowatt hour (my current rate), 18W of continues usage is about $1.50/month. We have only one refrigerator in the house, but I do have four HR20's, 1 R15, and an H20 that all draw power. In addition, I have a server that draws about 60W at rest and I also have a whole-house automation system that turns on lights, pool filter, etc. I am sure I could cut back on some things and bring my power bill down some, but I can guarantee that there is absolutely no way I could get it to $25/mo.

Even many, many years ago, before computers, DVR's, pools, or automated lights, I recall my power bill never getting below $50/mo in the winter. Back then, my summer bill would be close to $200/mo in the hottest months running the A/C. Basically, it's doubled now, so that $50 winter bill has crept up to closer to $100, then add in the extra "technology items" and it's more like $130.
 

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flipptyfloppity said:
That's incorrect that it's not much. A device that takes 18W continuously is roughly $18 a year on my electric bill (probably less for you if you live outside California). That's $1.50 a month. Given that my electric bill is about $25/month, it's a big change.

Refrigerators take a lot of power, but it'd be odd if your computers+refrigerators made up most of your power bill. Do you have a lot of refrigerators?
I don't sweat the "small things" like 18 watts.
If your bill is only $25/month, you must have a small refrigerator as they can be $20 alone.
I just had someone from PG&E here last night. They're upgrading my refrigerator and claiming I'll save $20/month. While I may save "some", I don't think it will make my bill $48/month for a 1,550 sq ft, all electric house.
 

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David MacLeod said:
water pumps add a lot too, while I don't have a water / sewer bill like city folk I have to pay on the back end for powering the pump.
furnaces from september to april also add a lot.
Same here (although I am inside city limits, it is a pretty rural area). No water bill but I replaced the pump a few years ago for $1200 (it was over 30 years old). And when the power goes out (several times each winter), so does the water and the heat.
 
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