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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was moving my dish (was have issues with trees so moved my large dish to the post where the no-longer used 18" dish was mounted (it's got less tree interference). I disconnected the LNB to wire up a tuner for aiming. While removing the cable from the LNB I discovered I removed the jack from the LNB! Surprise, those can be unscrewed!! Looking closer I see there was a silicone seal over the nut. So I was left with the post with a bit of a solder ball connected to the cable. Expecting this is not meant as a friction fitting, I screwed it back and hoped for the best... signal looks good so contact seems fine for now.... but I need to figure out how to best fix this and looking for help.

What I'm considering... cracking open the LNB, resoldering the post and the sealing the LNB. The other option is a little more questionable in my mind... use conductive epoxy on the solder ball then screw it back together. I'm an EE so I know nothing will beat reflowing the solder. But doing so will break the seal (if even possible) and then will need to be resealed with silicone caulk or epoxy. Neither method is without risks...

I think this is a SWM3 LNB. I found two older, what I think are, SWM5 LNBs... they don't say SWM so I'm not sure I think they were removed because this current one is supposed to be better and the 5's are maybe 10-15 years old. So I'll need to verify they are SWM.

Even if the bigger LNBs will work, I'm curious about what others think about repairing the current LNB.
 

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I was moving my dish (was have issues with trees so moved my large dish to the post where the no-longer used 18" dish was mounted (it's got less tree interference). I disconnected the LNB to wire up a tuner for aiming. While removing the cable from the LNB I discovered I removed the jack from the LNB! Surprise, those can be unscrewed!! Looking closer I see there was a silicone seal over the nut. So I was left with the post with a bit of a solder ball connected to the cable. Expecting this is not meant as a friction fitting, I screwed it back and hoped for the best... signal looks good so contact seems fine for now.... but I need to figure out how to best fix this and looking for help.

What I'm considering... cracking open the LNB, resoldering the post and the sealing the LNB. The other option is a little more questionable in my mind... use conductive epoxy on the solder ball then screw it back together. I'm an EE so I know nothing will beat reflowing the solder. But doing so will break the seal (if even possible) and then will need to be resealed with silicone caulk or epoxy. Neither method is without risks...

I think this is a SWM3 LNB. I found two older, what I think are, SWM5 LNBs... they don't say SWM so I'm not sure I think they were removed because this current one is supposed to be better and the 5's are maybe 10-15 years old. So I'll need to verify they are SWM.

Even if the bigger LNBs will work, I'm curious about what others think about repairing the current LNB.
Just buy a new one lol. They're pretty much "free" $10-15.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
then post its designations from green labels
The one on the dish is a 3D2LNBR0-02 (so the amazon one looks good)
The older ones both have an eagle lnb body looks like model: DTVSDLNB which sounds like SD, but I know it did HD but does not look SWM. I even discovered I still have a BSNA-501A ha ha.
 

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The only limitation that the unit that I linked to has is that it doesn't support Reverse Band that DIRECTV isn't currently using. If you want to cover yourself, you could get the one that does Reverse Band for a few dollars more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The only limitation that the unit that I linked to has is that it doesn't support Reverse Band that DIRECTV isn't currently using. If you want to cover yourself, you could get the one that does Reverse Band for a few dollars more.
The model you linked to is the exact same as the one that was on the dish (AFAIK) 3D2LNBR0-02 that looked to be the same. What the deal with "Reverse Band" and the importance if Directv isn't using it? Will that be important moving forward?
 

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What the deal with "Reverse Band" and the importance if Directv isn't using it? Will that be important moving forward?
That's a Magic 8 Ball question.

Speculation: I'd guess that RB will become even less of an issue and if DIRECTV isn't carrying the load of NFLST, there shouldn't be any temporary crushes for bandwidth. DIRECTV may use RB in the future but I'm betting that it won't be for residential service.
 

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The model you linked to is the exact same as the one that was on the dish (AFAIK) 3D2LNBR0-02 that looked to be the same. What the deal with "Reverse Band" and the importance if Directv isn't using it? Will that be important moving forward?
I suspect its importance might not come for another decade or so. If one of Directv's satellites, which should last until at least 2030, runs out of fuel or otherwise reaches end of life then it would be useful for replacing that lost capacity.

So given that Directv has been installing reverse band capable LNBs by default for the last few years it makes sense to continue that even if they could save couple bucks on an LNB without that capability, because just about all their customers at that future time would have reverse band capability, and the few who have LNBs that haven't been touched for 10-15 years would be easy to upgrade.
 

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If one of Directv's satellites, which should last until at least 2030, runs out of fuel or otherwise reaches end of life then it would be useful for replacing that lost capacity.
This makes some pretty big assumptions. End-of-life doesn't always mean running out of fuel. Perhaps more than half the time, it is related to some manner of physical failure.

Assuming that DIRECTV will be in a great position to replace the remaining non-RB capable setups (including non-SWiM STBs) with the latest gear is also questionable.
 

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I suspect its importance might not come for another decade or so. If one of Directv's satellites, which should last until at least 2030, runs out of fuel or otherwise reaches end of life then it would be useful for replacing that lost capacity.

So given that Directv has been installing reverse band capable LNBs by default for the last few years it makes sense to continue that even if they could save couple bucks on an LNB without that capability, because just about all their customers at that future time would have reverse band capability, and the few who have LNBs that haven't been touched for 10-15 years would be easy to upgrade.
Or maybe people (including myself) expected to have 4K live TV by now? :cautious:
 

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This makes some pretty big assumptions. End-of-life doesn't always mean running out of fuel. Perhaps more than half the time, it is related to some manner of physical failure.

Assuming that DIRECTV will be in a great position to replace the remaining non-RB capable setups (including non-SWiM STBs) with the latest gear is also questionable.
Satellites have tons of redundancy, a failure that can't be worked around is extremely rare. Case in point, Directv had some sort of failure in D14 a few years back due to a gyroscope. They were able to use one of the two other gyroscopes it has on board.
 

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They were able to use one of the two other gyroscopes it has on board.
Anik F2 (part of the Shaw Direct fleet) recently had something similar happen. It lost half of its station-keeping thrusters and as a result, is burning fuel at a rate that will see it retired three years early.

While tin whiskers are probably a thing of the past, there remain several potential points of failure without contemplating the environmental ones.
 

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Or maybe people (including myself) expected to have 4K live TV by now? :cautious:
From what sources?
HBO, ESPN, etc. The same group of channels that were first to market with HD channels. Somehow they didn't get 4K channels on the air. I'm sure you could list all the reasons and excuses but it would have been a pessimistic view a few years ago to say that 4K would be as limited as it is today on MVPDs.
 

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HBO, ESPN, etc. The same group of channels that were first to market with HD channels. Somehow they didn't get 4K channels on the air. I'm sure you could list all the reasons and excuses but it would have been a pessimistic view a few years ago to say that 4K would be as limited as it is today on MVPDs.
At one point it was waiting on ATSC 3.0 so the affiliates could broadcast.
 

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At one point it was waiting on ATSC 3.0 so the affiliates could broadcast.
That idea was crushed when the FCC and the station groups compromised on lighthousing and made the NextGen TV stations the lighthouses rather than the DTV stations. Now only a handful of the NextGen TV stations have the bandwidth to carry 4K. As a result, NextGen TV has become kind of a yawn.
 
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