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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased an HDTV. In addition, I also purchased and installed a Channel Master 4228 UHF antenna on my roof top (in the best possible place for reception). The cable run is brand new, high quality RG6 with no splitters or splices. In the process of adjusting the antenna, I found that I can get a reasonable signal (peaks between 70-88%) for the four primary networks in one fixed position. However, in rainy weather my lower end stations dip down considerably, at times causing pixelation in the picture.

When I initially went through the antenna adjusting on the roof, I found that there were two directions which yielded stronger channel reception. For example, at 340 degrees I could get ABC and FOX in the mid 90's and at 357 degrees I could get NBC and CBS in the lower 90's.

While I know there are antenna rotors, I wanted to find out if the scenario is realistic: Purchase and install a second CM4228 and point one at 340 degrees and the other at 357 degrees respectively; use a highquality splitter in reverse fashion to join the two signals and feed to my HDTV. My basic assumption is that I would get a single feed to my TV that will yield the maximum signal strength.

I'm not an expert in the science behind all this - and essentially would prefer to have two antennas in fixed positions pointing to two optimal points rather than dealing with a rotor. I would appreciate feedback from those that have either done this or know enough to advise me as to the feasibilty of this approach.

Thanks in advance to your responses!
 

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I have done this. With analog TV, it will work just fine. With digital, you may get a week signal on the "wrong" antenna and it can cause the digital receiver to be "confused" with the slightly out of sync signals.

The work around for that is to simply have a cable from each antenna and an old-fashioned A-B switch (like old-time video games had).
 

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Éminence grise
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Have you tried splitting the difference, pointing the antenna at 348.5? Perhaps an antenna with greater beamwidth in azimuth, like a CM4221 (essentially 1/2 of a 4228), would give suitable performance for both locations.
 

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I've got two 4228's mounted and pointed in opposite directions (I live between DC and Baltimore). As long as you don't have a lot of tall structures nearby that could be causing reflections and multipath interference you should be able to set them up and combine the outputs using a standard cable splitter/combiner. My antennas are pointed in completely opposite directions so there's little chance of overlap between them that could cause any problems.

The 4228's are highly directional so you'll see a severe dropoff in signal strength if you're not aimed directly at the broadcast towers. I think I'm missing one of the local channels from DC since I've got the antennas aimed at the main network affiliate towers. The missing channel is far enough off axis that I don't get a strong enough signal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Right now, I've got the one 4228 pointed in the middle - so I'm getting reasonable, but not great signal strength for all networks. The problem is that during rain storms, the weaker signals degrade to the point where I lose picture or have significant pixelation. That's why I'm after essentially adding another antenna, and having two focal points. My only concern is the issue that SamC posted, where a combined signal using a splitter doesn't really get the result I'm looking for... I wish there was a way to confirm or deny the assumption without investing in the hardware. I suppose that's my option.
 

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Godfather
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I suggest trying it. I use three antennas in my attic, all combined with a 3-1 splitter in reverse. Two both point the same direction because neither by itself was good enough. A third small antenna was added pointing a different direction (90 degrees from the others) to pick up closer stations that the big antennas weren't getting at all. Keep your receipt in case it doesn't work, and make sure the store has a return policy.
 

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My advice would be to boogie over to AVSForum.com, track down the Seattle OTA thread and post an inquiry for Dan Kurts (AKA Dan the Antenna Man). He's great when it comes to questions like this. While you're there, see if there's a thread for your neck of the woods and you may find others in the same boat.

Good luck!

John
 

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bobnielsen said:
Have you tried splitting the difference, pointing the antenna at 348.5? Perhaps an antenna with greater beamwidth in azimuth, like a CM4221 (essentially 1/2 of a 4228), would give suitable performance for both locations.
I'd second this notion using a 4221.Much wider pattern than the 4228,but still does amazingly well.I've recently used a 4221 in an attic at 54mi,and outside at 60+mi,using a CM777 preamp with solid results.The OP didn't mention using a preamp..that could help...or stack another 4221(vertical) with equal-length feedline for an improvement of the wide arc he's looking for.
 
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