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· Mentor
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Unknown to me when my 722 was installed the installer plugged it into a wall outlet even though there is a surge protector in the cabinet.
I have seen some posts where a suggestion was made to plug the receiver into the wall in lieu of a surge protector when trying to solve a problem.
Do the receivers have internal surge protection, if not, what happens when a receiver gets cooked by a surge?
 

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nospmahm said:
Unknown to me when my 722 was installed the installer plugged it into a wall outlet even though there is a surge protector in the cabinet.
I have seen some posts where a suggestion was made to plug the receiver into the wall in lieu of a surge protector when trying to solve a problem.
Do the receivers have internal surge protection, if not, what happens when a receiver gets cooked by a surge?
One reason to not use the average surge protector is so you can use the built-in DISHCOMM (HOMEPLUG) Powerline adapter to connect to each other (currently only for phone line sharing) and to connect to a Homeplug device connected to your internet.
 

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Receiver has built some built in surge protection, and some surge protectors do cause problems (I don't know the specifics of why).
 

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HomePlug technology (built-in to the Dish receiver) has built-in surge protection also. Due to the nature of the internet-over-powerline it only made sense for surge-protection to be a combined feature.

So your receiver should be safe from surges if it has the HomePlug technology.

Now, if you need line conditioning, that's a different beast... so if you are prone to spikes/brownouts or general noise, then your HomePlug might not work that well anyway and it would be better to plug into the protector/line conditioner in that situation I expect.
 

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In addition, it's just used as a trouble shooting procedure. If you are plugged into a protector/conditioner and have problems you will be asked to plug it into the wall to eliminate the possibility of the problem being caused by the protector/conditioner. If you are plugged directly into the wall you might be asked to use a protector/conditioner to see if you really do need one.
 

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From the 5/11/09 tech forum - http://www.dishuser.org/tech0905.php

Joe Cufari, Director of Business Development for Intellon. Uses a home's existing power wiring by connecting your router to an adapter connected to an outlet. Up to 16 devices may be connected. Dish ViP receivers have the chipset built in, so they don't need their own adapter. Some things to avoid:

* switched outlets
* HomePlug AV (not compatible with HomePlug 1.0 or Turbo)
* Dimmers on the same circuit (can cause interference)
* GFI outlet (ground fault indicator). Some have interference, ones since the 80's are better
* Phonex equipment
* Surge protectors, except compatible ones

They chose this over wireless because of all the electromagnetic radiation from other A/V equipment that is likely to be near your Dish receiver. Older receivers use HomePlug 1.0 (typical 4 Mbits/sec throughput), the 922 will have HomePlug Turbo (7-8 Mbits). The Dish STB power supply has all the stuff typically found in a surge suppressor so they recommend connecting directly to a wall outlet.
 

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SaltiDawg said:
No hassle intended, but I can not find this supported at their www site... http://www.homeplug.org/
I swear I didn't make it up... but I can't remember where I read it before. I can't remember if it was a Web site or literature included with one of my HomePlug adapters.

I'll have to follow and get back to this thread if I can find where I originally read that.
 

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The only problem that I know for sure is if you run the Coax through the surge protector. Some are not rated for the higher frequencies and do cause problems. I have not seen any that cause problems with the power cord being plugged into a surge protector.
 

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Stewart Vernon said:
I swear I didn't make it up... but I can't remember where I read it before.
Sounds familiar to me too, but what I'm remembering is the last sentence quoted in post #8 which is not specifically about HomePlug. I haven't researched HomePlug so don't know if it has any kind of built-in surge protection.
 
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