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It is probably the same thing people were thinking in the late 50's, 60's,and 70's- "What OTA antenna will give me the best picture, rabbit ears, attic, outdoor?" The choices and types of antennas has changed, buy the answer has not - it's Winegard. It is nice to see that most stations are broadcasting Digital OTA on the UHF Frequency. but some stations are assigned VHF frequencies from the FCC for digital, and this requires a good quality antenna. I noticed even Earl in Tinley Park, Illinois can not receive CBS-HD out of Chicago with his attic mounted antenna,-due to CBS digital is being broadcast on VHF Channel 3 in Chicago. I also heard that after the Digital change over is complete, in a couple of years, that the FCC might also reassign different frequencies, so that some stations that broadcast now in UHF, might have to go back to VHF. This information was passed on by a Broadcast engineer. I am not taking any chances, I bought the top of the line Winegard HD 8200P Platinum HD VHF/UHF/FM Antenna (HD8200P), this baby can handle anything.
 

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Huh?

Are you consumer reports now? I use a $30 Zenith Silver Sensor and it works perfectly, others use other brand. So really, other than the fact that you put your money into Winegard, why should I or anyone else think they are the best. You say clearly, but it does not seem clear to me.

Xaa
 

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Xaa said:
Huh?

Are you consumer reports now? I use a $30 Zenith Silver Sensor and it works perfectly, others use other brand. So really, other than the fact that you put your money into Winegard, why should I or anyone else think they are the best. You say clearly, but it does not seem clear to me.

Xaa
Actually, if one wants the best antenna, that is properly defined by two parameters: gain and directivity (they are NOT the same thing). If the manufacturer's gain figures and antenna pattern can be trusted (that's a BIG IF), then it simply becomes a matter of comparing. Very few manufacturers accurately provide this info. One I looked at yesterday did so, but I can't recall whether it was Channel Master or Wineguard. Of course the gain and pattern must be specified at various channels...or it is meaningless. The antenna with the highest average gain and cleanest pattern (best directivity) is by defiinition the "best" antenna. The problem is, it may not be the best antenna for YOU (your needs)

As you so rightly point out...the best antenna for any given person is the one that reliably gets the desired channels (and is built ruggedly enough to stay in one piece). I have two friends who asked me this same question. For the first one, the answer was the Silver Sensor. For the second one, it was the Radio Shack U-75 (40" boom with corner reflector, cost: $25.00), although he could get a somewhat reliable picture with a two bay bow tie. (free, on loan from me)

I think the OP was referring to a "fringe" situation, and in that case the first "engineering" definition I provided above would apply.

People really should check things out before they blow over a $100 for any antenna. They can check three ways:

1. Go to AVS forum, select your city or one nearby and ask the users what works in their area. (making special note if only UHF or both UHF and VHF are/will be required.)

2. Go to antennaweb.org and plug in your zip code and some other variables and see what it says.

3. If you have anything laying around, try it first and see what happens.

The best antenna is "clear"...the best antenna for the actual situation the user faces, is anything but clear without trial and error or doing the proper questioning/research before you blow your money.
 

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